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How Sarah Paulson Feels About Ocean’s Eight Having Haters

Ocean’s Eight got a lot of grief for being a gender-swapped edition of an existing franchise, but one of the actresses involved has a response to the hate. Sarah Paulson has a response, but what she doesn’t have is much of an opinion, because she doesn’t really care what the haters have to say about the movie she was in. At the end of the day, she apparently had an absolute blast making Ocean’s Eight and nobody really has that much control over whether or not a movie is a financial success. According to Paulson…

A lot of parallels were drawn between Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters reboot and Ocean’s Eight. Both movies were additions to franchises that swapped out entirely male casts for entirely female casts. This resulted in both films receiving backlash. To what degree the backlash impacted the box office is far from clear, but Sarah Paulson isn’t losing any sleep over the question. She had a blast making the movie, nothing else really matters to her.

For the record, Ocean’s Eight did fine at the box office. It made almost $300 million globally on a budget reported to be around $70 million. It only came in about $15 million behind the previous entry in the franchise, Ocean’s Thirteen, so it doesn’t really look like the movie suffered. The Ghostbusters reboot fared somewhat more poorly. The film only made about $230 million and had a much higher budget due to the post-production digital effects.

According to Bustle, the stars of Ocean’s Eight had a text chain going where they all communicated with each other on a regular basis, certainly confirming that the co-stars have remained close since making the movie together. For Sarah Paulson, the personal relationships are clearly going to be a bigger takeaway than the box office receipts. Why in the world would she waste time caring about how full the theater was?

Sarah Paulson is too busy to care about such things. In between filming series like American Horror Story and American Crime Story, the actress has been making movies like the upcoming Bird Box for Netflix and Glass for M. Night Shyamalan. And she’s up for making an Ocean’s Eight sequel, if only so she can hang out with her friends again.

The Best Under-the-Radar Food Destination in the U.S.

AT CLOSE to 1.5 million people, San Antonio is bigger than Austin, bigger than San Francisco or Seattle, bigger than New Orleans. Yet it’s forever overshadowed by those celebrated food cities. Move along. Nothing to see here but endless enchiladas and the Alamo.

That postcard stereotype of the city is changing at Mixtli, where two of the country’s best young chefs are creating 10-course travelogues of Mexico’s culinary history. It’s changing at Cured, where a brass-trimmed curing cabinet harbors trussed-up sausages, ham and mystery bits to dress charcuterie plates.

And it’s a picture that began to change for me in 2011, with an anniversary trip from Austin that included chef Andrew Weissman’s Italian showcase Il Sogno and chef Steve McHugh’s New Orleans cooking at Lüke on the River Walk, the city’s winding concourse of restaurants and hotels. Il Sogno and Lüke are gone now, lost in the churn of a restaurant scene in full surge, a scene that brought me here two years ago as the new restaurant critic for the San Antonio Express-News. I’m still a tourist in a sense, commuting from Austin five days a week.

Prix-fixe Mexican gastronomy, served in a boxcar, at Mixtli.
Prix-fixe Mexican gastronomy, served in a boxcar, at Mixtli. Photo: Max Burkhalter for The Wall Street Journal

MEAT AND GREET / A Cook’s Tour of San Antonio, Dish by Dish

The Best Under-the-Radar Food Destination in the U.S.
Photo: Max Burkhalter for The Wall Street Journal

The chef: Geronimo Lopez, Botika

Local favorites: 2M Smokehouse for barbecue (2731 S WW White Rd., 2msmokehouse.com); Niki’s Tokyo Inn for sushi (819 W Hildebrand Ave.); Outlaw Kitchens for the cooking of former Culinary Institute of America colleague Paul Sartory (2919 N Flores; outlawkitchens.com)

The chef: Esaul Ramos, 2M Smokehouse

Local favorites: Southerleigh Fine Food & Brewery for crab mac and cheese (136 E Grayson St., southerleigh.com); Garcia’s Mexican Food for chilaquiles and brisket tacos (842 Fredericksburg Rd.); Maria’s Cafe for Mexican food (1105 Nogalitos St.); Taquitos West Ave. for tripas tacos (2818 West Ave., taquitoswestavenue.com); Pollos Asados Los Norteños for chicken al carbon (4642 Rigsby Ave.)

The chef: Brooke Smith, the Esquire Tavern and Downstairs at the Esquire

Local favorites: Clementine in Castle Hills for updated Southern cooking (2195 NW Military Hwy., clementine-sa.com); Mark Bliss’s contemporary American Bliss (926 S. Presa St., foodisbliss.com)

The chef: Elizabeth Johnson, Pharm Table

Local favorites: Teka Molino for Tex-Mex (7231 San Pedro, tekamolino.com), Ah Dong for Vietnamese (5222 De Zavala Rd.); La Boulangerie for quiche and pastries (207 Broadway St.); Botika for Peruvian-Chinese food (303 Pearl Pkwy., botikapearl.com); Cured for charcuterie (306 Pearl Pkwy., curedatpearl.com); chef Johnny Hernandez’s Fruteria for tostadas: “He grows his own corn.” (1401 S. Flores St.)

What I’ve seen at more than 600 trattorias, bistros, steakhouses, sushi bars and craft-driven cafes in that time is a city taking a seat at the chef’s table without losing respect for the Tex-Mex, tacos and barbecue that got it here in the first place. In the past year alone, I’ve seen the San Antonio that Unesco designated as a world-wide Creative City of Gastronomy for upholding its culinary heritage as well as the progressive city that supported the openings of new Jamaican, Indian, Japanese ramen and American Southern restaurants.

Creative new energy shaped by a strong sense of the past makes San Antonio one of the most compelling under-the-radar food destinations in the country, even if you won’t see it on those hyperventilating lists of America’s best food cities. Not yet. But that’s about to change. “For a long time, we were playing catch-up with Austin, Portland and San Francisco,” said Brooke Smith, executive chef at San Antonio’s Esquire Tavern, citing those cities’ focus on craft and quality. San Antonio is “slowly turning” in that direction, she said.

That turn is a long time coming, but not without remaining grounded in tradition. “We’re this confluence of cultures. We’re Native American, we’re Spanish, we’re Mexican, we’re German, we’re Czech, we’re Polish. A lot of San Antonians are falling in love again with our own backyard,” said Elizabeth Johnson, the chef behind the vegetable-centric downtown cafe Pharm Table. It might help that the backyard is more affordable than many others: “It’s still a place where a person with humble means can open a restaurant for under a million dollars,” said Ms. Johnson. (She opened Pharm Table with just $510, starting out as a meal delivery service.)

Ms. Johnson credits a good part of the food scene’s modern energy to the restored Pearl Brewing Co. compound just north of downtown. The Pearl, as it’s called, is home to more than 20 places to eat, drink and get coffee, along with some of the city’s most expensive rental property, the retro-swanky Hotel Emma and—here comes the boom—a Culinary Institute of America campus.


Dining Deep in the Heart of Texas

A few of the restaurants redefining San Antonio’s food scene

The charcuterie platter at Cured, one of the best restaurants at the Pearl complex, a resuscitated collection of stately industrial buildings now housing dozens of restaurants and shops.
Max Burkhalter for The Wall Street Journal

If you’ve ever had Pearl beer, I apologize. It’s not good. But the brand was built on solid bones in the late 1800s, and after Pearl brewed its last San Antonio beer, billionaire investor Christopher “Kit” Goldsbury swooped in with a vision in 2002 to resuscitate the stately industrial buildings. It’s part steampunk amusement park and part culinary mecca. One of the best restaurants at the Pearl is Cured, which Mr. McHugh opened in 2013 as a testament to the hearty food of his Midwest upbringing. He’s been a James Beard Award finalist three times with dishes like pig-cheek poutine and a Red Wattle pork chop with spoonbread. But he’s not too fancy to work Pabst Blue Ribbon into a cheeseburger.

Across the complex at the original brewhouse, Southerleigh Fine Food & Brewery brought beer back to the Pearl when it opened in 2014, with as many as 14 styles. The beer complements the Gulf Coast cooking of chef Jeff Balfour, whose fried snapper throats could be called chicken of the sea. His fried chicken, meanwhile, takes on a Southern charm with golden biscuits and crab macaroni and cheese.

Southerleigh Fine Food & Brewery.
Southerleigh Fine Food & Brewery. Photo: Max Burkhalter for The Wall Street Journal

The Pearl also attracted Venezuelan-born chef Geronimo Lopez and his restaurant Botika, where he cooks the Chinese- and Japanese-influenced food of Peru. It’s a place for sushi, ceviche and a gloriously messy union of steak, fries, gravy and eggs called lomo saltado. “There’s a core of San Antonio taste, whether it’s Tex-Mex style or Mexican style cuisine or more of the Texas meat and potatoes or barbecue,” Mr. Lopez said. “At the same time, there’s a huge taste for new things.”

Those new things sometimes wear a vintage veneer. Chef Michael Sohocki revved up the time machine downtown in 2011 when he opened Restaurant Gwendolyn, where his mission to party like it’s 1849 means holding true to methods and machinery available 150 years ago. Think hand-cranked mixers and a positively medieval arsenal of tools for cutting, pounding and kneading.

And down on the raucous River Walk, the 80-year-old Esquire Tavern, long famous for day drinkers and misdemeanors, didn’t even have a kitchen until 2011, when Ms. Smith came aboard. Seven years later, she and her staff are curing their own charcuterie, making short-rib empanadas and running a stylish cocktail speakeasy called Downstairs.

The historic Esquire Tavern.
The historic Esquire Tavern. Photo: Max Burkhalter for The Wall Street Journal

A few blocks from downtown in the city’s artsy Southtown neighborhood, the Italian restaurant Battalion has transformed a 1920s firehouse into a cross between a modern osteria and a European disco. Co-founder Andrew Goodman preserved the firepoles and painted the wheelchair lift fire engine red, and chef Stefan Bowers curated a menu of 10 pastas for $10 each that’s one of the city’s best fine-dining values.

The 80-year-old Esquire Tavern, famous for day drinkers, didn’t have a kitchen until 2011.

In the middle of San Antonio’s culinary tumult, even the city’s traditional foods are getting a second wind. 2M Smokehouse energized and frustrated San Antonio barbecue fans with equal intensity when it opened in 2016. They lined up for juicy brisket with a volcanic bark, handmade sausage with serranos and Oaxaca cheese, and mac-and-cheese spiked with chicharrones. Then they complained about everything else: the long lines, paying $20 a pound for brisket and the chance that everything would be sold out by the time they got to the front.

“Ten years ago, I would agree” with all the gripes, said pitmaster and co-owner Esaul Ramos. “But barbecue’s not what it used to be. You can’t use the cheap cuts of meat anymore. You can’t shortchange yourself.”

San Antonio is still one of the country’s best cities for tacos, something I explored in 2017. Reporting on a taco joint a day, I drove 6,000 miles, saw a priest take a parking lot confession, got threatened at a strip club taco trailer, sat through some bad karaoke and ate 1,387 tacos.

The best of those taquerías opened only last year. Carnitas Lonja, named for the love handles you might get from eating there, emerged as a new favorite by keeping it simple: pork boiled in lard until it’s crispy at the edges, then shredded for carnitas tacos on fresh corn tortillas.

Carnitas tacos at Carnitas Lonja.
Carnitas tacos at Carnitas Lonja. Photo: Max Burkhalter for The Wall Street Journal

With the opening of Mixtli in 2013, Mexican food has evolved from San Antonio’s symbol of its storied past to the food that will help define its future. Working from a converted railcar, chefs Rico Torres and Diego Galicia take deep dives into regional Mexican cooking with multicourse prix fixe menus. A meal might include sweetbreads with coffee mayo from the Sierra Nevada or a beggar’s purse with duck carnitas to represent colonial influences.

With one seating on most nights, Mixtli is changing the way Americans think about Mexican food—and San Antonio’s restaurant landscape—12 people at a time.

FORGET THE ALAMO / Five Other Sites to Take in Between Meals
The Best Under-the-Radar Food Destination in the U.S.

McNay Art Museum Picasso, Gauguin, Matisse, Renoir, Warhol—the big names call this patrician, 1920s Spanish Colonial mansion and its modern art collection home. 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., mcnayart.org

Mission San José The city’s five Unesco World Heritage missions—built by Spanish Franciscans in the 1700s—sometimes get lost in the glare of their most famous member: San Antonio de Valero, aka the Alamo. Explore the others, starting with Mission San José, a breathtaking stone citadel that still holds Catholic Mass on weekends. 6701 San José DR., nps.gov/saan

San Antonio Museum of Art Housed in the restored Lone Star Brewery, the museum devotes a wing to Latin American art from pre-Columbian to contemporary. Exhibits also span the ancient Greek, Roman and Egyptian worlds, plus an extensive Asian collection. Celebrity chef Jason Dady operates Tre Trattoria on-site, with a terrace view of the River Walk’s idyllic Museum Reach. 200 W. Jones Ave., samuseum.org

Brackenridge Park Bisected by the San Antonio River, this 343-acre park offers the oldest municipal golf course in Texas, a Japanese Tea Garden carved from a former stone quarry and easy access to the Witte Museum and its natural history exhibits. Most important? The San Antonio Zoo, for when the kids need to see a baby hippo more than they need a culture fix. 3700 N. St Mary’s St., brackenridgepark.org

Hotel Emma At the heart of the lively Pearl Brewing Co. complex is the 146-room Hotel Emma. New York design studio Roman and Williams imaginatively preserved the turn-of-the-century industrial accents—like the mottled network of pipes and valves in the lobby. Even if you’re not a guest of the hotel, take in the cinematic space with a drink at the Sternewirth, the hotel bar, or an upscale dinner at the Supper American Eatery on the ground floor. Rooms from $357 a night, 136 E. Grayson St., thehotelemma.com

More in Off Duty Travel

Busy Philipps Is ‘Bummed’ at How the Media Is Covering Her Story About James Franco

Busy Philipps‘s brand-new memoir, This Will Only Hurt a Little, has earned rave reviews from countless friends and fans since its release earlier this month. But on Thursday night’s episode of Watch What Happens Live, the actor expressed some dismay at the level of coverage a certain excerpt is receiving.

In one section of her memoir, Philipps details the abuse she allegedly suffered at the hands of James Franco when they both starred on the show Freaks and Geeks as teenagers. Philipps told Cohen that she was disappointed by the media’s incessant coverage of the story, not only because it overshadowed the rest of her book, but also because it put so much attention on a man’s story rather than on the woman who wrote that story. “It really bummed me out because I felt like, I’m a woman in this industry who wrote a very personal book about my experiences in life and in this industry,” she said, “and the headlines were all about a man. I was like, that was my point the whole time.”

The incident in question allegedly happened on the Freaks and Geeks set, during a scene where her character hit Franco’s character in the chest. That action, she wrote, prompted him to scream, “Don’t ever touch me again” at Philipps before allegedly throwing her to the ground. Philipps told Cohen that Franco had apologized and that she hasn’t spoken to the actor in some time. She added that she was particularly surprised by the reaction to the Franco story because she’d actually already told the story on, coincidentally, a previous episode of Watch What Happens Live.

Philipps also addressed the issue on Instagram earlier this month. “My book is 308 pages, not one paragraph,” she wrote. “The Franco story is used to illustrate a larger point about the way women are treated in this business and in life. There are no ‘allegations’ and no ‘accusations.’ It’s a story that I have been telling for years. James apologized. I accepted.”

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Busy Philipps Just Used Grammar to Shut Down a Body-Shaming Troll

Busy Philipps Is ‘Bummed’ at How the Media Is Covering the James Franco Story in Her Book

Busy Philipps‘s brand-new memoir, This Will Only Hurt a Little, has earned rave reviews from countless friends and fans since its release earlier this month. But on Thursday night’s episode of Watch What Happens Live, the actor expressed some dismay at the level of coverage a certain excerpt is receiving.

In one section of her memoir, Philipps details the abuse she allegedly suffered at the hands of James Franco when they both starred on the show Freaks and Geeks as teenagers. Philipps told Cohen that she was disappointed by the media’s incessant coverage of the story, not only because it overshadowed the rest of her book, but also because it put so much attention on a man’s story rather than on the woman who wrote that story. “It really bummed me out because I felt like, I’m a woman in this industry who wrote a very personal book about my experiences in life and in this industry,” she said, “and the headlines were all about a man. I was like, that was my point the whole time.”

The incident in question allegedly happened on the Freaks and Geeks set, during a scene where her character hit Franco’s character in the chest. That action, she wrote, prompted him to scream, “Don’t ever touch me again” at Philipps before allegedly throwing her to the ground. Philipps told Cohen that Franco had apologized and that she hasn’t spoken to the actor in some time. She added that she was particularly surprised by the reaction to the Franco story because she’d actually already told the story on, coincidentally, a previous episode of Watch What Happens Live.

Philipps also addressed the issue on Instagram earlier this month. “My book is 308 pages, not one paragraph,” she wrote. “The Franco story is used to illustrate a larger point about the way women are treated in this business and in life. There are no ‘allegations’ and no ‘accusations.’ It’s a story that I have been telling for years. James apologized. I accepted.”

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Busy Philipps Just Used Grammar to Shut Down a Body-Shaming Troll

Halloween Reviews: What CinemaBlend Thought Of The New Michael Myers Movie

The Halloween franchise is one that seems to be as immortal as the primary antagonist of the series. However, rather than making just another sequel, the new Halloween takes the novel approach of ignoring every film that’s been made except for the 1978 original. How well does this strategy work? Well, we here at CinemaBlend think it works pretty well. Our official review was written by Eric Eisenberg and he thinks it works very well. Eric gave the movie 4.5 stars and says…

With the exception of the Michael Myers-less Season Of The Witch (which I will staunchly defend), the legacy of the Halloween franchise has not been a strong one. And yet, in one fell swoop David Gordon Green has managed to both clean the slate and redeem the brand. It’s a frightening and fun homage to the original that also breathes on its own – wonderfully subverting expectations and tropes on its path. It further intensifies the on-going horror boom, and is nothing short of a marvel.

Those are some pretty strong words of praise, but Eric’s not the only one that feels that way. The main thing the new Halloween needed to be was something more than “just another sequel” and it seems that it largely succeeded. CinemaBlend Managing Director Sean O’Connell has pretty similar feelings about Halloween, saying that the movie is as likely to make new fans as it is to satisfy the old ones.

What Halloween pulls off isn’t quite impossible, but it’s very difficult. It revives a classic horror series — one that has been beaten and exhausted by its own sequels — and makes it feel fresh, relevant, original and vital. It continues, and satisfyingly closes, Laurie’s journey. But it also serves as a thrilling slasher throwback in its own right. Halloween plays to die-hard fans, but also remembers it needs to create new ones. It is terrifying and funny, tense and shocking. It’s the Halloween sequel loyal fans have been waiting for.

Needless to say, the new Halloween had a lot of responsibility. There were surely many different people who wanted many different things from it. While the film might not acknowledge any of the previous sequels, there are fans of the films that still want this movie to feel distinctly like a Halloween movie. There are also younger fans of horror that may not be as familiar with the original film, but have expectations for what a modern horror movie should be. The good news, at least according to CB’s Braden Roberts is that the film delivers all of it.

Halloween manages to walk the line between nostalgia and fresh scares. There’s something for everyone, from truly disturbing horror to dark comedy. Halloween is a compliment to original and is a great addition to the recent uptick in quality horror films.

While there really isn’t a dissenting voice at CinemaBlend, project manager Cody Beck at least doesn’t speak of Halloween in quite as glowing terms. While he admits it’s the best Halloween sequel to date, that may be somewhat faint praise. While the film eventually finds its groove, Cody felt it took its sweet time getting there…

Halloween opens with a not-quite-convincing-enough scene of terror and continues to roll slowly for the first 30 min- even through some pretty brutal stuff. It definitely isn’t shy about what it is, with numerous callbacks to the original as well as a quick jab at the sequels. A little bit of humor throughout, a few nice twists and some very violent kills, it’s easily the best follow-up to John Carpenter’s original.

It seems quite clear that Halloween will do well appealing to fans of the franchise, but just how well does it do with people who aren’t necessarily all-in for Michael Myers? There are a couple of us who weren’t necessarily looking for a new Halloween movie, but are still glad we found one. CinemaBlend Sr. Movie Contributor Mike Reyes admits that the Halloween franchise doesn’t mean the same thing to him that it does to many moviegoers, but he was absolutely a fan of this movie.

As someone who didn’t grow up idolizing John Carpenter’s original, 2018’s sequel to Halloween made me see just why the series, in its best form, has had such a lasting impact. David Gordon Green, Danny McBride, and Jeff Fradley have created a tense roller coaster of a film that not only stands out as a horror hit, but also qualifies as an exemplary family drama/thriller in the process. Let’s hope the franchise stays on this path and never let’s down its bad ass trio of female leads or its audience.

I’m very much in this same boat. Horror really isn’t my genre if I’m being honest. Jump scares will get me literally every single time and I end up spilling my popcorn and getting annoyed. Also, I find the original Halloween to be a bit too slow in its build and most of the characters to be less than interesting, and thus their deaths less than tragic. Having said all that, I enjoyed the new Halloween more than I expected to. While it clearly pays homage to the original, it’s not married to do doing things the way that movie did, which helps a great deal.

If you’re a serious horror or Michael Myers fan I’m not the guy to tell you if Halloween is worth your time, but I enjoyed it well enough. It’s not as streamlined as the original and it doesn’t take itself 100% seriously, (like 80-85% seriously) but to me, that’s a benefit.

Overall, it seems clear that if you’re looking for a horror movie to watch this Halloween season, you could hardly do better than the new Halloween. It works if you’re a big fan of the original, it works if you’re not. It may or may not go down in history as the best Halloween sequel or a particularly great horror movie, but you could certainly do worse. It’s in theaters now.

Blended From Around The Web

 

19 Prairie Dresses to Shop for Fall 2018

Some lump it into the Western revival, others describe it as part of an anti-sexy movement within the industry; the Washington Post deemed it to be the “most provocative thing in fashion;” the New York Times characterized fans of its look as “pioneer women…” No matter how you characterize it, explain its rise, or feel about this very specific silhouette, it’s clear that the prairie dress is at the very center of the fashion zeitgeist.

Those long-sleeved, mid-to-maxi-length dresses, usually in some sort of antique-looking floral are pretty pervasive for Fall 2018 and future seasons, but it’s been a slow burn. This aesthetic—and its hero item—has been the bread and butter of smaller fashion brands like the New York-based Batsheva (worn by celebrities like Lena Dunham, Gillian Jacobs, and Amandla Stenberg) and London label The Vampire’s Wife (beloved by the likes of Alexa Chung, Florence Welch, and Olivia Wilde) for a few years now. They’ve helped make these modest, frilly frocks in vintage prints and fabrics go mainstream—before bigger names like Dior, Coach, and Kate Spade New York started incorporating the silhouette (or pieces derived from it) into their collections.

For the designers behind the prairie dress trend, this isn’t a surprising development: On the rise of more covered-up fashion, designer Batsheva Hay of Batsheva told Glamour that “women today are reevaluating our behavior and our choices… I want [my clothes to embody] what our decisions would be like if we actually made all of our own choices, without considering what men think we should wear.”

If you’re curious about the dress sensation that’s sweeping the industry—or, at the very least, want to see what all the fuss is about—consider the 19 prairie-esque styles for your fall wardrobe.

HeroBlend #27: What Will DC Do With Batman And Superman?

Welcome to HeroBlend #27! The DCEU is, reportedly, switching things up and possibly looking to move on from Ben Affleck’s Batman and Henry Cavill’s Superman. So, it’s time for Adrienne and special guest co-host, ReelBlend‘s Sean O’Connell, to talk all about what that move could mean for the cinematic universe going forward! First, though, we’ll go through some intriguing news items, including when Doctor Strange 2 might begin filming, the cancellation of a Marvel Netflix show, word on the Flash solo movie being delayed yet again, and a behind the scenes photo from Spider-Man: Far From Home which has led to some big MCU questions.

Then, we’ll get into the depths of why the DCEU might be leaving Affleck and Cavill behind, what it might mean for the universe as it continues, what the immediate, general, plans for the DCEU seem to be and why this whole thing is just a big ol’ mess. Next, Sean and Adrienne will talk about Marvel’s Phase 4 plans and what they could tell us about the outcome of Avengers 4. Six films seem to be definite for Phase 4 (if that’s even what Marvel decides to call it), but there are a few properties that are up in the air right now and could end up making appearances, so we’ll break down everything we know right now.

Last, but (regrettably) not least, we have to talk about Venom. The man-eating symbiote and his human have done quite well for themselves in live action, and now people want to know what the deal is with Venom 2. We’ll go over the somewhat surprising box office numbers and let you know what Sony should be doing to get the sequel off the ground, as well as what’s going on with the larger Spider-Man Cinematic Universe. Sit back and relax, folks, because this is one chat you’re not going to want to miss! Ready to dive in? Great! Listen for yourself above!

3:14 – Doctor Strange 2 Could Start Filming Soon
7:47 – Iron Fist Cancelled at Netflix
11:52 – Flash Movie Delayed Again
14:00 – New Set Photos From Spider-Man: Far From Home
19:53 – Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill Likely Done Playing Batman and Superman
34:41 – What Does Marvel’s Phase 4 Tell Us About Avengers 4?
46:35 – Venom Repeats at the Box Office. When Are We Getting Venom 2?

Now, get in on the superhero-filled fun and have a listen to the HeroBlend Podcast #27! And, be sure to subscribe to the HeroBlend Podcast on iTunes, right here and follow us on Twitter, @HeroBlend.

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy

They just keep getting bigger and bigger. No, not mortgage rates or iPhones, but designer sneakers. The mad scientists at haute labels such as Gucci and Balenciaga have been stuffing their soles like turduckens as sneakers increasingly cross over from actual exercise equipment to exercises in over-the-top design. Yet while these inflated kicks are populating premium department stores and boutiques, sportswear institutions like Nike and Adidas are perfecting soles that are as light as a feather. Here, we’ve ranked the latest options in sneakers, from the barely there to the boldly bloated.

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
8.0 oz (per shoe)

Zoom Fly SP Sneakers, $150, nike.com

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
11.5 oz

Adidas Originals Yung-1 Sneakers, $120, adidas.com

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
12.7 oz

Rick Owens Sisyphus Sneakers, $972, rickowens.eu

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
1 lb 2.4 oz

Run Away Sneakers, $1,330, Louis Vuitton, 212-758-8877

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
1 lb 4.9 oz

Chain Reaction Sneakers, $995, Versace, 212-317-0224

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
1 lb 6.4 oz

Track Sneakers, $850, Balenciaga, 310-854-0557

Men’s Sneakers Are Getting Freakishly Heavy
Photo: F. Martin Ramin/ The Wall Street Journal
2 lb 1.0 oz

Flashtrek Sneakers, $1,590, gucci.com

More in Style & Fashion

How Peter Dinklage Helped Jamie Dornan Prepare For Fifty Shades Freed

There are a lot of fairly famous names in Fifty Shades franchise movies, but we didn’t know until recently that Game of Thrones actor Peter Dinklage was actually responsible for helping Jamie Dornan get ready for the third movie Fifty Shades Freed. During a recent appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Peter Dinklage volunteered the information, noting,

Following Peter Dinklage’s amusing reveal about how he helped his My Dinner With Herve co-star Jamie Dornan prep for Fifty Shades Freed, Stephen Colbert chimed in with a great joke of his own, noting after Peter Dinklage said he “nailed it” that he thinks “that was one of the lines.” Classic late night.

All in all, it’s still a really funny image to think about Jamie Dornan and Peter Dinklage sitting in a dressing room together and reading a bunch of “kinky fuckery” sex scenes with Dinklage in the role Dakota Johnson plays in the movie. Scratch that, I’m really hoping they were rehearsing the scene where Anastasia Steele makes Jamie Dornan steak and they talk about having a family. The possibilities for Dinklage and Dornan rehearsing scenes are endless.

Stephen Colbert also attempted to get Dinklage to compare Fifty Shades fans with those fans who are obsessed with HBO’s Game of Thrones. However, Peter Dinklage said there may not be as much crossover as Colbert seemed to be implying, noting that he personally feels they are very different fanbases.

Peter Dinklage was on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to talk about his upcoming movie My Dinner with Herve, a TV flick which is airing on HBO this weekend and tells a story about Fantasy Island actor Hervé Villechaize. Peter Dinklage and Stephen Colbert may have just met, but they do have a good rapport, so take a look at the full interview, below.

As for Jamie Dornan, the Fifty Shades Freed actor will also appear in My Dinner with Herve and has a slew of other projects coming up as well thanks to the success of his BDSM movie series. You can also catch him in Robin Hood and A Private War coming up. Although, it’s probably safe to assume Peter Dinklage wasn’t also around to read Jamie Foxx or Rosamund Pike’s parts, unfortunately. I need more collaborations between the two actors right meow.

Watch It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia Recreate A Classic Seinfeld Scene

It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia naturally got weird again for a bizarre “clip show” episode, and recreated a piece of television sitcom history. The Gang dressed up as Seinfeld‘s central characters and performed a shot-for-shot recreation of a classic scene from “The Contest.” You can watch the scene below alongside the original clip from Seinfeld itself.

We have a Redditor to thank for this comparison-urging video, and it’s really impressive just how well It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia was able to mimic the Seinfeld scene. Even with stars Glenn Howerton and Rob McElhinney both playing Jerry, the scene works relatively well and only falls behind the original sketch in pacing a couple of times.

The gang certainly deserves an A for effort and a pat on the back for being the closest thing television has gotten to a primetime Seinfeld reunion since Curb Your Enthusiasm. What’s really great about this scene is the painstaking effort that went into recreating Jerry’s apartment. Viewers who analyze EzloTheMinish‘s video can spot the various differences, but without the Seinfeld scene right there, it could easily be mistaken for the actual set. That’s dedication, especially considering the scene was used for a relatively short bit.

For those who didn’t catch the Sunny episode, the Seinfeld moment happened in the midst of an off-kilter clip show when Sweet Dee accidentally confused the Gang’s own adventures with the masturbation-focused exploits from Jerry’s crew. The episode featured other false memories and flashbacks, but also had its fair share of legitimate past highlights. It was a twist on the classic “clip show” episode many programs have done, although it probably took more work to create this episode than those due to the new scenes.

So, who wins the award for the best Seinfeld character impersonation? Kaitlin Olson deserves a fair share of credit for carrying the scene, although she played the part more like Sweet Dee than Elaine. Charlie Kelly’s Kramer impression was pretty great, albeit somewhat exaggerated when measured up against the actual scene. When one takes into consideration Danny DeVito didn’t have to do much as George Costanza, perhaps the winner here is Glenn Howerton and Rob McElhinney’s performances as Jerry?

Honestly, the entire cast are winners in this scenario, as It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia once again skirted the line of surrealist comedy perfectly. Performing a Seinfeld sketch in costume is a bit that could’ve easily ended up being a dud, especially given the show’s rabid fandom even to this day. If the show continues cooking up fresh and inventive ideas, it might just stay on the air long enough to claim the title of longest-running live-action television comedy.

It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia Season 13 airs on FXX on Wednesday nights at 10:00 p.m. ET. It’s one of many shows airing this fall season, so be sure to check out our fall premiere guide to get the scoop on other programs premiering and returning over the next couple of months.