Make Up For Ever Pro Light Fusion Highlighter Is the Only Makeup I Need

My makeup philosophy distilled into a single sentence goes something like this: I will happily forego wearing cosmetics if it means I can sleep in an extra five minutes. In practice, this means swapping out all base products for an 11-step skin care routine. I spend 20 minutes marinating my face in serums and creams each evening so that when my alarm starts blaring the next day, I can splash water on my face and slather on sunscreen while running out the door.

It should come as no surprise that highlighters don’t exactly fit into this equation. When your complexion is still radiant from the mild acid peel you did the night before, why bother putting shimmer over it? I’ve tried plenty of luminizers before—from the cult classic every makeup artist seems to swear by to the geometric pans Rihanna made us all fall in love with—and yes, they’re both as magical as you’ve heard. But, I’ve never felt compelled to add either one to my daily rotation. I only reach for them on the occasions when I feel like channeling a dewy nymph or iridescent mermaid, respectively.

Make Up For Ever’s Pro Light Fusion highlighter isn’t like that. It mimics the look of your skin perfectly, only picture your skin gently bathed in the warmth of a million sunbeams, the softness of a candelabra, or the angelic light of a LuMee when it cooperates. Forget everything you thought you knew about liquid formulas looking more natural. This is a powder, but it’s so finely milled that it seems to become one with your cells the second it makes contact. The brand credits this to something called “Gellyfying System technology.” I cannot tell you precisely what this means, because I have not a single clue, but it results in a powder that vanishes beneath my fingertips. It’s simultaneously dusty and creamy to the touch, and where similar formulas (particularly shiny ones) usually exaggerate any dryness on my skin, this one airbrushes whatever part of my face it makes contact with.

In true, lazy fashion, I apply it with my hands. You can, of course, upgrade this step if you choose—the brand recommends sweeping their Precision Highlighter Artisan Brush #144 in a figure-eight motion for a diffused effect, or packing it on with the flat surface of the same brush for metallic cheekbones.

Having misplaced every brush I used to own, I will continue swiping my middle and ring fingers across the pan, then transferring whatever they pick up to my face. I dot it on the inner corners of my eyes and cupid’s bow, then draw a line down the center of my nose and “C” shapes from my temples to my cheekbones. (To simplify, just observe wherever the light naturally hits your face and trace over it with your fingers.) Then, I quickly go over those areas again with my product-free hand to blend. Start to finish, it takes no more than 15 seconds.

There are two shades in the range: Gold and Rose Gold. Gold is lovely: a soft, coppery color. I, however, only care about Rose Gold—because while it resembles the inside of a seashell in the pan, it somehow contains the ideal balance of warm and cool tones on your skin. The day I first wore it, my former boss shouted my name from the other side of the room to ask which new facial or miracle serum was responsible for my otherworldly glow. “It’s really highlighter? Are you sure?” a friend recently asked me while scrutinizing my profile by lamplight.

Occasionally, I experience a moment of doubt when I pick it up and observe its high-wattage iridescent surface. I still don’t fully understand the alchemy that transforms it from what looks nothing like skin to a soft-focus filter. This is fine with me—I don’t need to understand it. I just need a lifetime supply.

Make Up For Ever Pro Light Fusion Luminizer in Rose Gold, $39, sephora.com

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Meghan Markle Finally Wore Her Hair in a Ponytail, and I Can’t Stop Staring at the Pics

It’s been an exciting few days for Meghan Markle. First, she and Prince Harry announced that they are expecting their first child. Then, she embarked on her highly anticipated first royal tour. Now, she’s wearing her hair in a — wait for it — ponytail. No, I did not say messy bun.

The Duchess of Sussex, who is currently in Australia to kick off the international tour, apparently decided to ditch her signature look, but this isn’t some spontaneous ponytail created with a hair tie. It’s a royal pony through and through, with her hair delicately brushed back and tied just above her ears. It’s not quite low enough to be a low ponytail, so we’ll call this a medium ponytail. She also secured her ponytail the sophisticated way — with her hair fastened around the clasp.

We’re not sure exactly where Queen Elizabeth stands on ponytails, but Markle has long been known for breaking royal protocol when it comes to her fashion and beauty choices. Heck, the newest royal even shuts her own car door! It should be no surprise to fans that she’s continued to switch up her style while attending royal engagements abroad.

meghan markle ponytail 1

PHOTO: Samir Hussein/Getty Images

meghan markle ponytail 2

PHOTO: Karwai Tang/Getty Images

The Duke And Duchess Of Sussex Visit Australia - Day 2

PHOTO: Getty Images

The Duke And Duchess Of Sussex Visit Australia - Day 2

PHOTO: Getty Images

But, of course, it’s tough to resist combing through Markle’s hairstyles to unearth clues about her personal life. For instance, last month, some eagle-eyed royal watchers were convinced that the duchess wore her hair pin straight (also, a relatively new look for the new royal) as a hint that she was expecting. Even though she is in fact pregnant, we’re pretty sure her hair had nothing to do with it. As far as we’re concerned, Markle can wear her hair up, down, wavy, or covered in dry shampoo any day with stunning results.

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Meghan Markle Somehow Found Time to Bake Banana Bread for a Royal Engagement

It’s a good rule of thumb to never show up to a gathering empty-handed — even if you’re a royal. Meghan Markle clearly knows this, because she brought a loaf of homemade banana bread with her on a visit to New South Wales, Australia on Wednesday (October 17), according to The Daily Mail. She and Prince Harry were visiting a local family in the area as part of their two-week royal tour across Australia, Fiji, and New Zealand.

The duchess reportedly whipped up her baked goods on Tuesday night following her and Prince Harry‘s jam-packed day full of engagements in Sydney. She apparently used the kitchen of Admiralty House, the home of the Governor-General of Australia, where the couple is staying while in Sydney. Rebecca English, the Daily Mail‘s royal correspondent, attended the Wednesday morning tea, and shared photos of Markle’s banana bread on Twitter. It looks delicious, naturally.

banana bread embed

PHOTO: Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Per English, who also got to taste the bread, Markle mixed chocolate chips and “a bit of ginger” into the loaf, which English said turned out “rather nice” and “went down well” with the assembled crowd.

Markle referred to herself as a foodie on several occasions before joining the royal family. On her now-defunct blog The Tig, she often spoke about her favorite restaurants and shared plenty of recipes.

Clearly, Markle has carried her love of food into her new life as a royal. Before this banana bread moment, the duchess spent time cooking with the women of the Hubb Community Kitchen in London, and, as her first solo royal project, released a cookbook with them to raise money for the kitchen. Here’s hoping her next cookbook includes this banana bread recipe.

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Connie Britton on Dirty John, the Zombie Apocalypse, and More

Actress Connie Britton first captured our hearts in 2006 on Texas sports drama Friday Night Lights as Tami Taylor, a compassionate guidance counselor and wife of Dillon Panthers high school football couch. Next, she scared us all in season one of Ryan Murphy’s cult show American Horror Story and then showcased her vocal chops on Nashville as Queen of Country Rayna Jaymes alongside Hayden Panettiere. She subsequently went onto star in two more Ryan Murphy backed projects, 2015’s American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson and this year’s 9-1-1.

Starting on November 25, Britton will star in the much anticipated true crime podcast turned Bravo limited series Dirty John as Debra Newell, a successful woman looking to fall in love online and ends up in quite the situation. To promote her new eerie role, Britton candidly answered “The Big Questions” for Glamour’s November issue below.

What’s your full name, and where does it come from?

Constance Elaine Womack. My mother had a really dear friend named Connie, who passed away of cancer right before my twin sister and I were born, so I was named after her.

What’s your most irrational fear?

Failing. But one thing I’ve learned is that even if you do fail, you grow so much from that experience that it isn’t really failure.

What’s your idea of true happiness?

That’s such a funny one because there’s the macro version which is you know the world being at peace and all people communicating and relating to each other in a productive way. And then there’s the more immediate tangible one which is being with my dearest, closest friends and family and great conversation and time to spend together and good food and laughter.

Illustration by Helen Green

On the other hand, what is your idea of hell on Earth?

People being oppressed and being in a situation where people have no power and have no voice.

What’s the greatest invention of all time?

The wheel!

And the worst?

The freeway.

If you could be anyone, real or fictional, who would it be?

I would be interested in like what it would be like to be Mother Theresa because she seemed to be able to have such a completely generous life in a way where it felt completely authentic and her selflessness didn’t seem to take a toll on her. I would be fascinated to get into her skin and know exactly how her heart and her brain work.

When the zombie apocalypse comes what skill will you contribute to the new society?

I’m doing Dirty John right now and there’s a character in our show that is basically obsessed with the zombie apocalypse so it’s put the zombie apocalypse in a whole new light for me. I’d be a really good lead hugger. I’d be really good at giving hugs and that would remind people like, “Hey take it down a notch. You don’t need to be so aggro. Let’s all connect with each other as we’re rebuilding society.”

What’s something you wish you’d written?

Thelma & Louise, but I got to do the second-best thing and work with the film’s writer, Callie Khouri[on Nashville].

You’re stuck on a desert island and can bring only three things. What are they?

I’d want to have a man there, a knife, and a memoir called To Shake the Sleeping Self that my friend Jedidiah Jenkins wrote. I can give him a shameless plug. He’s the most beautiful writer. It’s an incredible book about his travels. He took a bike journey for a year and in the course of doing that he really learned a lot about himself.

Would you rather be able to stop time or speed it up?

Definitely stop time. I don’t even know what the speeding of time means. It just causes me immediate stress to think about it! As far as I’m concerned the idea of stopping time sounds fantastic. You can stop at a particular moment and hang out there for awhile? Great news.

If you could phone a friend right now, who would it be?

My phone a friend is really always my friend Carla. We’ve been friends for a very long time. She always has amazing insight. She’s one of those friends that I feel like she can see me so clearly even when I can’t see myself. And so she can always give me really wonderful insight when I need it and can’t find it.

What chapter of your own life would be most fascinating to read?

This one! I know more now than I ever have.

This story appeared in Glamour’s November issue.

Ariana Grande Just Announced She’s Taking a Break From Social Media

Ariana Grande has announced she’s taking a step back from social media.

In a Instagram Stories slide, the Sweetener singer said she’s temporarily quitting social media to avoid seeing negative news bites. Whether she’s referring to stories about her reported breakup with Pete Davidson is unclear. “Okay, today was very special and I’m so grateful I was able to be there,” the singer wrote on her Instagram Story, per People, in reference to her participation in NBC’s A Very Wicked Halloween. “Time to say bye bye again to the Internet for just a lil bit. It’s hard not to bump news and stuff that I’m not trying to see right now. It’s very sad and we’re all trying very hard to keep going. Love you. And thank you for being here always.”

Earlier in the day, Grande posted another Instagram Story—her first since the reported breakup—that spoke to some anxiety issues she was experiencing. “Can’t believe I almost let my anxiety ruin this for me today!” she wrote, again, referring to the Wicked special. “Not today Satan! Not tomorrow or the next day either, not no more… [gonna] sing my heart out and be a big walking vessel of love. Bye.”

PHOTO: Instagram

Neither Grande nor Davidson has directly addressed the end of their whirlwind engagement, which culminated in a swanky New York City apartment, pet pig, and $100,000 diamond engagement ring. TMZ claims their relationship ended “with both parties acknowledging that it simply was not the right time for their relationship to take off,” while People reported, “It was way too much too soon…it’s not shocking to anyone.” Here’s hoping both of them get some well-deserved privacy.

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Every Single Outfit Meghan Markle Has Worn on Her Royal Tour of Australia

Meghan Markle is expecting a baby, but she’s also celebrating another royal first: She and Prince Harry have embarked on a royal tour of the Commonwealth halfway across the globe. From October 16th through the 31st, the couple will visit Australia, Fiji, the Kingdom of Tonga, and New Zealand, with an education- and serviced-based itinerary centered around environmental conservation, youth leadership, and rehabilitation for servicemen and women. And, as we know from previous royal tours, that means there are a lot of photo opps.

With several days of appearances and events lined up, we’re gearing up for two straight weeks of Duke and Duchess of Sussex moments—from PDA to, yes, fashion. And from the moment she touched down in Sydney, Markle has delivered. (Not that we expected anything less from a woman who can wear tuxedo dresses and fast-fashion blouses with equal finesse.) Early outfits have included looks by Karen Gee and Brandon Maxwell, which has only raised the anticipation for the rest of her travel wardrobe. So we’re gathering them all in one place: Check out every single ensemble Markle has worn on her 2018 royal tour so far, with plenty of updates coming throughout the next two weeks.

We bring you the trends. You make them your own. Sign up for our daily newsletter to find the best fashion for YOU.

LXMI Nut Butter Face Moisturizer Review

Words I live by: you can’t be perfect at everything from day one. That philosophy and my consciousness of the world was instilled early on by my grandmother, who hitchhiked across the globe and met my grandfather in India in the late forties—a crazy thing for a young white woman to do at the time. I was lucky that I grew up feeling like I didn’t need to follow certain life rules or a specific timeline. It’s what made me decide to take a gap semester in Africa when I was 17. My family didn’t have much money, but I convinced them and my college scholarship committee to let me use some of the funds to do volunteer work in Ghana. That trip changed my life.

It’s where I saw firsthand how important the sustainable development of wild plants is in ensuring that our planet is still here a thousand years from now. Right now we’re cutting them down and destroying their biodiversity at a rate faster than we can study them. Uganda is the place I discovered Nilotica, a rich, soothing skin butter native to rural areas there and in South Sudan that’s hand-­harvested from trees that take 20 years to mature. Nilotica butter is so pure you can literally eat it. And if you look at the skin of the local women who collect the nuts, all smooth and spot-free despite working 12-hour days in the sun, you know it’s legit. I was like, Why can’t I buy this instead of the stuff that costs $200 and does nothing for the planet or my face? So I got to work.

After finishing college and building a tech nonprofit that provides work for low-income communities around the world, I launched a sustainable beauty brand called LXMI two years ago. My goals: that it feature natural, plant-based ingredients; multipurpose formulations that tackle a variety of skin issues so we can consume less stuff altogether; and eco-packaging (currently, we at LMXI use glass and recyclable materials but are working toward fully biodegradable packaging for upcoming collections).

Along the way, I’ve learned that the future of beauty isn’t about a one-size-fits-all routine or a “go big or go home” green ethos. It’s about growing and tweaking and trying to make smarter choices moving forward. And not feeling bad about any of it. Because shame doesn’t motivate change; progress does.

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People Are Calling Jennifer Garner ‘Unlikable’ in Camping—But That’s Missing the Point

On Sunday, HBO premiered its latest series, Camping, a comedy-drama co-created by Girls showrunners Lena Dunham and Jenni Konner. Starring Jennifer Garner as an uptight, Instagram-obsessed micromanager named Kathryn opposite comics like Juliette Lewis (as the free-spirited Jandice) and Bridget Everett (as the hilariously aloof campground manager Harry), the show is about a meticulously-planned camping trip gone awry.

But despite Dunham and Konner’s previous success with Girls, Camping has been met with flack from critics and the Twitterverse alike. And the criticism is directed at one character in particular: Garner’s Kathryn. One harsh review of the show called the female lead “an excruciating character,” who is “controlling, demanding, and self-centered.”

“Garner plays an absolute shrew,” a Twitter user wrote. Another asked, “Am I supposed to hate Jennifer Garner’s character? ‘Cause if so yeah I hate her so far.”

The short answer to that question: No, you’re not supposed to hate Kathryn. You don’t have to understand her or justify any of her undeniably irritating habits, but you’re not supposed to hate her. And honestly, why do you?

This collective hatred of Kathryn that’s been clouding Twitter dialogue over the last few days says a lot more about our society than Dunham and Konner’s writing. Sure, Kathryn’s irritating and condescending. But isn’t she basically Ross Geller with fewer friends, a “dysfunctional pelvic floor,” and a robust social media presence?

Maybe the hatred stems from the fact that this is a far cry from Garner’s typically typecast “girl-next-door” roles. In Camping, she’s not playing the fun-loving Jenna Rink audiences are used to. Instead, she’s a 40-something wife and mother who’s fond of order, Groupon discounts, and being right. She’s controlling, obsessive-compulsive, and complicated, as noteworthy characters often are. Kathryn isn’t looking for your approval; she’s looking for your attention—the same attention audiences afforded the equally irritating Don Draper or Walter White.

It’s hard to imagine television would be what it is today with an even-tempered Tony Soprano, a selfless Frank Gallagher, or an amenable George Costanza. None of these characters were particularly “likable” by any account, and seemed to inhabit a number (if not all) of the same qualities as Kathryn. And yet, critics have found the female version of these characters insufferable because our society doesn’t have a problem with “unlikable” characters. It has a problem with “unlikable” women.

PHOTO: HBO

And as Garner’s costar Brett Gelman pointed out, what does the word “unlikable” even mean? “I’m so sick of this word ‘unlikable.’ I’m so sick of reading it in reviews. I think it’s lazy,” Brett Gelman told The Hollywood Reporter. “Look, you don’t like the show, you don’t like the characters, that’s one thing, but what does ‘unlikable’ even mean? That people have flaws and we’re supposed to be putting characters on the screen and on the stage that are perfect people? That’s boring. Then you don’t have drama. If they don’t think that they’re redeemable, I personally disagree. When they say, ‘unlikable,’ I’m like, ‘You’re half-watching it.'”

“You have Kathryn leading this show, where if she was a man, I think people would think that that character was hilarious,” he added. “Nobody wants to see a woman onscreen who is a wreck. That is pure, unadulterated systemic misogyny.”

Imagine if we were to question Larry David’s likability in Curb Your Enthusiasm? Or Frank Underwood’s in House of Cards? We don’t, because it doesn’t matter. Would I want to have a beer with Kathryn? No. Would I want to go camping with her? Hell no. But you’d also never find me on a camping trip with Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory.

Don’t get me wrong: Camping isn’t a perfect show. The complaints that the story gives little insight or growth are well founded. But in an era where women are met with contempt when they challenge the patriarchy or oppose authority, the language we use to characterize their representation on screen matters.

So here’s to “unlikable” female leads. I’d like to see more of them.

Jennifer Lance is an assistant editor at Glamour.

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Nicole Maines Is the Superhero Television Needs Right Now

Transgender actress and activist Nicole Maines made history over the summer when The CW announced she’d be playing a superhero in the upcoming season of Supergirl.

The casting makes Maines the first-ever transgender superhero, which is a groundbreaking feat, but she’s been moving the dial forward for years now. In 2013, the 21-year-old first rose to prominence as the plaintiff in Maine’s Supreme Court case Doe v. Clenchy, concerning transgender bathroom rights, after Maines’ parents sued her school for denying her the right to use the women’s restroom. The court ruled in her favor—changing the law forever.

Now, Maines is about to change the scope of television. On Supergirl, she plays Nia Nal, a new reporter at CatCo whom Kara (Melissa Benoist) takes under her wing. We chatted with the actress shortly before Supergirl premiered about her historic casting and what viewers can expect from Nia Nal. Read on, below.

How does it feel to be playing the first transgender superhero on television?

There are a lot of emotions. I’m so happy. I’m so excited, honored. It’s a lot of responsibility because it hasn’t been done before. I don’t want to screw it up, but this character is amazing. I think people are going to love the purity of this character. She’s so pure; I want to protect her. Had I had a trans superhero growing up, it would have been so monumentally inspirational for me. I’m just really, really honored that I get to bring this character to life.

How did you find out you got the role?

My agents called me. I had had a super long night the night before [working on a movie], so I was sleeping. Running on minimal sleep. They called me and said, “Hey, they want to offer you this part.” It was a combination of disbelief and being half asleep, but I was just, like, “Oh wow!” They had to tell me, like, three times. And I went back to sleep. [Laughs.] It didn’t sink in for a couple of days. It’s still unreal.

Has there been a moment since then where it has sunk in that this is happening?

One of the first days I was filming, it sunk in. Like, “I am here. I am here in CatCo. Oh my gosh, this is happening.” It was the same thing with Comic-Con. Going into Comic-Con through the back door, into the green room. Everyone was there. I was like, “How did I get here?”

What are the biggest differences between your character, Nia Nal, and the DC Comics version of her, Nura Nal?

So Nura Nal is from the comics. The 31st century is when Nura Nal is active. Nia Nal is in present day. She’s a new reporter at CatCo. She is bubbly. She is super bright, caring, and has very similar energy to what Kara had in season one: that very wide-eyed, hopeful kind of energy. And then she takes on this kind of mentor relationship with Kara, where Kara has moved into this position mentoring Nia as a young reporter.

How much does Nia’s trans identity play into the narrative? Are there storylines devoted to trans issues?

What I really appreciate about Nia is her storyline is not exclusively a trans storyline. She has issues outside of her being trans. Of course, it’s also important with the concept of intersectionality [to know] she’s looking at everything through a trans lens. She can’t separate that part of her identity. It’s part of who she is. Everything she encounters this season is put through the lens of her being a reporter, being a woman, being a trans woman. She looks at them through all of these filters. So being trans isn’t necessarily singled out. This season, it’s really heating up tensions between humans and aliens, and Nia’s perspective as a trans woman is really important to how she deals with that.

American Alien

PHOTO: The CW

What problems are you still seeing in the industry with representation, and what is the next step?

One of the problems I’m seeing in the industry right now is, of course, not having trans actors play trans characters, but we are seeing more and more people taking steps to cast along those lines. That’s important because it validates any trans audiences watching. It validates the character and their gender and their experience. It really brings authenticity to it, which is very important, especially in today’s climate. Another issue is we are seeing characters who are token. We see the token trans character, and it falls on them to represent the entire community as the individual, and so their storylines are often centered around their gender identity. They don’t see a lot of character growth outside their trans-ness. That’s very limiting from a writing perspective. It’s very limiting from an acting perspective. There’s not a lot of places the character can go when they’re funneled into just being the trans character. That’s what so amazing about Nia.

What do you hope Hollywood looks like in 10 years?

In 10 years, I’m hopeful it will be a given that trans actors play trans people. That it’s expected. It’s just as if you were going to have a character of color; it’s expected you’d have a person of color play that character, even though today we still see issues of whitewashing in the media. We experience the same thing with gender identity. We want to see trans actors play trans characters. I hope in the next 10 years it just becomes more of an expectation that, yes, this character will obviously have to be played by a trans actor. I’m also hoping in the next 10 years that we’re going to see more LGTBQ characters, more queer representation in the media, so that less responsibility falls on individual characters to represent their entire community. That’s kind of impossible. You’re looking at one person and saying, “OK, that’s trans people.”

What do you hope trans people watching Supergirl take away from your character?

That we as trans people can really do anything we put our minds to. We are limitless. If a trans woman can be a superhero, that’s ‘gotta be peak for anybody. When you see yourself as a superhero, that’s ‘gotta be where the goal posts are. If I’m seeing me as a superhero, I really can do whatever I want. I can be whoever I want.

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Behold Cardi B Using a Dinglehopper to Brush Her Hair

Life isn’t often the stuff of Disney movies, but you can bet that doesn’t stop Cardi B. Before taking the stage at a Drake and Migos show in L.A. this week, Cardi made time to zhuzh her thigh-length wig. Without a brush on hand, she grabbed the next best thing: A plastic fork. And just like that, dreams of a Cardi-as-Ariel crossover took the internet by storm. If you’ve seen the Little Mermaid, you know the iconic scene (Ariel grabs a fork and combs it through her long, red hair). So this was a dinglehopper moment for the ages, a case of fantasy inspiring reality in the weirdest beauty sitch to hit in a minute. Then again, it’s Cardi B, so expect the unexpected.

Cardi’s no stranger to the long, long wig look, so she must know that tangles are no laughing matter. Rather than risk it, she expertly pulled the fork through her hair. On Instagram, she captioned the shot, “When you don’t have a brush so you use a fork.” Her wig master, Tokyo Styles, regrammed the video and called out the Little Mermaid comparison: “When all fails use the fork aka dinglehopper …… still laid.”

He’s not wrong—the fork left Cardi’s hair looking smooth and sleek.

It might be unconventional, but waist-length hair, and Cardi, don’t live by anyone’s rules. More importantly, the clip demonstrates how much the world needs to see Cardi as Ariel. Rumor has it that Lady Gaga is in the running for Ursula’s role in the live action Little Mermaid reboot, and the only thing that could be better is if Cardi joins the ensemble. Drake could even play Flounder. A girl can dream.

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