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Johnny Depp Reveals He Was Freaked Out By The Fame That Came With Pirates Of The Caribbean

Johnny Depp has been open in the past about his path from indie actor to major box office draw and how originally Disney wasn’t sold on his portrayal of Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. However, in a recent tell-all interview with GQ, Johnny Depp really got into detail about what happened after he became a major name in Hollywood. Overall, he said he was “freaked out” by the fame, noting,

Speaking out about his career, Johnny Depp mulled over switching from taking roles like Ed Wood or Edward Scissorhands to taking on roles that plenty of children and adults alike are familiar with. Although Depp is now-famous for turns in Alice in Wonderland and Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them, it was the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie that bumped him from a fairly popular lead to one of the largest stars in Hollywood, a role that did come with pitfalls. Namely, Depp revealed that working with the studios proved to be more difficult than some of his other, less expensive movies.

While Johnny Depp also opened up about Amber Heard and the myriad lawsuits that have been a major part of his life recently in the interview with GQ, some of the stuff he mentioned about acting and about working with Disney is among the most interesting. He also brought up the story about how Disney early on didn’t really get what Johnny Depp was going for with Captain Jack Sparrow, echoing comments he’d made previously mentioning that the higher-ups at Disney did not get on board until after the first movie in the franchise became successful.

Johnny Depp was clear about his direction with the character and the first movie went on to make more than $654 worldwide. Looking back, the actor mentioned he wasn’t mad at the House of Mouse for all the questioning the studio did regarding the character, but he does believe studios should know what they are getting into when they sign him on for a role. He said:

Fame has its pitfalls, but despite the drama Johnny Depp has been embroiled in, he’s seen some lawsuit wins lately and his career is still going strong. You can next catch the actor in Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, which will hit theaters on November 16. Or see what else Johnny Depp has coming up with our full guide.

How Lady Gaga Helped Bradley Cooper Work Drag Into A Star In Born

While there are plenty of seasonal movie choices hitting theaters this October, the movie with the most critical buzz is Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut, A Star Is Born. The musical drama features he and pop sensation Lady Gaga as its two leads, in the third remake of the classic story. The past two generations have each gotten their own A Star Is Born, and Cooper’s vision will focus on a duo of songwriters. Coper’s Jackson Maine discovers Gaga’s character Ally singing in a drag bar, in a sequence that also features RuPaul’s Drag Race fan favorites Willam Belli and Shangela. CinemaBlend’s Sean O’Connell got to speak with Gaga and Cooper recently, where they revealed how Gaga helped introduce Cooper to the inner workings of drag culture, and how it was worked into A Star Is Born.

While providing a unique mcguffin for Jackson and Ally’s first meeting, it seems that drag queen culture actually ended up fascinating Bradley Cooper. And since he directed, wrote, and starred in A Star Is Born, its nice to see how specifically he approached the task– including becoming familiar with drag makeup.

CinemaBlend’s Sean O’Connell spoke with Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga at the Toronto Festival, where they broke down the film’s meet cute. As shown in the trailers, Bradley Cooper’s Jackson Maine wanders into a drag bar after a show, simply in hopes of putting a few back. But when he sees Ally perform “La Vie End Rose”, complete with drag makeup and false eyebrows, he’s instantly enamored.

But instead of having the drag queens function largely as set dressing, two of the queens have featured roles and fully formed characters. They’re played by two of the most popular contestants to come from the reality competition show RuPaul’s Drag Race: Shangela and Willam Belli– who Bradley Cooper is sure to name drop in his conversation with CinemaBlend. It’s a moment that Lady Gaga had a hand in crafting, and gives a nod to the singer’s history with the LGBT community.

You can catch A Star Is Born, drag queens and all, when it hits theaters on October 5, 2018. In the meantime, check out our 2018 release list to plan your next trip to the movies.

Meghan Markle Brought Back Her Wedding Hair For Her First Trip to Sussex

When Meghan Markle and Prince Harry arrived in the English county of Sussex on Wednesday, all was right in the world: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were, appropriately, in Sussex. Markle and Prince Harry were back on their joint royal outing grind, and Markle’s hair had made its triumphant return to her now-famous low, slightly undone bun. This is the first time we’ve seen the bun in a while, since she’s taken to wearing her hair down and either pin-straight or in beachy waves for recent appearances.

In fact, the duchess’s hairstyle on Wednesday was almost exactly the same as the look she wore to her wedding in May—so perhaps it was paying homage to the day she received her Sussex title. The bun was low and securely pinned to the nape of her neck, her hair was parted right down the middle, and a few face-framing tendrils were loosely curled and left free to add movement and soften the look.

It makes sense that Markle would repeat this style time and time (and time) again, since, as her wedding hairstylist Serge Normant explained to Glamour, it only takes about 45 minutes to create—less if the day isn’t as important as, you know, your literal wedding day—and perfectly captures Markle’s effortless glam and easygoing vibe. “We wanted something that would have an easy feel to it,” Normant said. “We both knew we wanted to do something very loose in the back and soft in the front…I know everyone’s fixating on the word ‘messy,’ but it was more like unstructured volume. A low bun in the back with dimension.”

The rest of her look for the appearance was similarly attainable and down-to-earth. Her green silk shirt, for example, is less than $100 from & Other Stories.

Meghan Markle Recreated Her Wedding Hair for Her First Visit to Sussex 1

PHOTO: WPA Pool/Getty Images

Meghan Markle Recreated Her Wedding Hair for Her First Visit to Sussex 2

PHOTO: Samir Hussein/Getty Images

Meghan Markle Recreated Her Wedding Hair for Her First Visit to Sussex 3

PHOTO: WPA Pool/Getty Images

Meghan Markle Recreated Her Wedding Hair for Her First Visit to Sussex 4

PHOTO: Mark Cuthbert/Getty Images

Meghan Markle Recreated Her Wedding Hair for Her First Visit to Sussex 5

PHOTO: WPA Pool/Getty Images

Markle and Prince Harry are in Sussex just for the day. So far, per social media updates from Kensington Palace, they’ve received an extremely warm welcome from the locals, visited one of just two existing authentic copies of the Declaration of Independence, and headed on to the University of Chichester. Next up, they’ll travel to East Sussex, where they’ll visit the Royal Pavilion, the Survivors Network of Britain, and the Peacehaven Youth Centre.

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Hip-Hop Is Huge, but on the Concert Circuit, Rock Is King

‘You don’t really make a lot from record sales anymore,’ says Patterson Hood, onstage left. His band Drive-By Truckers, shown last month at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, generates the vast majority of its income from live performances.
‘You don’t really make a lot from record sales anymore,’ says Patterson Hood, onstage left. His band Drive-By Truckers, shown last month at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, generates the vast majority of its income from live performances. Photo: Melissa Golden for The Wall Street Journal

Everyone thinks hip-hop is king, but in the concert business, rock rules.

Older rockers like the Rolling Stones get most of the credit for driving North America’s $8 billion concert-touring industry, but an underappreciated reason for live music’s boom is the strength of smaller acts.

Drive-By Truckers is one example. The Athens, Ga., band, which has released 11 studio albums over 20 years, isn’t dominating streaming services like Spotify or Apple Music. Yet it has a loyal following that spends $30 a ticket every year for its shows.

The group, which revolves around singer-songwriters Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley, plays literary, punk-infused rock. Unlike pop stars, Drive-By Truckers doesn’t leave the road for long: It averages 100 shows a year, usually two to three hours long, selling 1,000 to 3,000 tickets in most markets.

The Drive-By Truckers, from left: Jay Gonzalez, Brad Morgan, Matt Patton, Mike Cooley and Patterson Hood.
The Drive-By Truckers, from left: Jay Gonzalez, Brad Morgan, Matt Patton, Mike Cooley and Patterson Hood. Photo: Melissa Golden for The Wall Street Journal

Touring provides more than 80% of the band’s livelihood. “The way the music business is—that’s our income,” Mr. Hood says. “You don’t really make a lot from record sales anymore.”

The record business has rebounded after years of decline, thanks to royalties from streaming-music providers like Spotify. Hip-hop and R&B, America’s most popular genre, accounts for 38% of U.S. on-demand audio streams, versus 20% for rock.

But in the live-show realm, rock is thriving. When Billboard ranked last year’s 50 highest-earning music acts, using U.S. record sales, streaming, publishing and concerts, there were three times as many rock acts as hip-hop ones. The reason: Touring accounted for nearly 80% of the 50 acts’ combined earnings, compared with 8% from on-demand streaming.

Rockin’ Out

Among last year’s 25 top-grossing music tours, more than half of them were rock.

2017 Worldwide Gross (millions)

Guns N’ Roses

Bruno Mars

Depeche Mode

Paul McCartney

Ed Sheeran

The Rolling Stones

Garth Brooks

Celine Dion

Justin Bieber

Roger Waters

Billy Joel

The Weeknd

Tim McGraw,

Faith Hill

Red Hot Chili Peppers

Ariana Grande

Tom Petty &

The Heartbreakers

Elton John

Neil Diamond

Robbie Williams

2017 Worldwide Gross (millions)

Guns N’ Roses

Bruno Mars

Depeche Mode

Paul McCartney

Ed Sheeran

The Rolling Stones

Garth Brooks

Celine Dion

Justin Bieber

Roger Waters

Billy Joel

The Weeknd

Tim McGraw,

Faith Hill

Red Hot Chili Peppers

Ariana Grande

Tom Petty &

The Heartbreakers

Elton John

Neil Diamond

Robbie Williams

2017 Worldwide Gross (millions)

Guns N’ Roses

Bruno Mars

Depeche Mode

Paul McCartney

Ed Sheeran

The Rolling Stones

Garth Brooks

Celine Dion

Justin Bieber

Roger Waters

Billy Joel

The Weeknd

Tim McGraw,

Faith Hill

Red Hot Chili Peppers

Ariana Grande

Tom Petty &

The Heartbreakers

Elton John

Neil Diamond

Robbie Williams

2017 Worldwide Gross (millions)

Guns N’ Roses

Bruno Mars

Depeche Mode

Paul McCartney

Ed Sheeran

The Rolling

Stones

Garth Brooks

Celine Dion

Justin Bieber

Roger Waters

Billy Joel

The Weeknd

Tim McGraw,

Faith Hill

Red Hot Chili

Peppers

Ariana Grande

Tom Petty &

The Heartbreakers

Elton John

Neil Diamond

Robbie Williams

In terms of concert-tour revenue, rock accounts for 55% of the $5 billion generated by last year’s top 100 highest-grossing tours worldwide, excluding nonmusic acts, compared with 11% for R&B and hip-hop, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of data from the trade publication Pollstar. Of the 25 highest-grossing tours globally last year, only two—Bruno Mars and the Weeknd—were hip-hop and R&B acts.

Collectively, smaller rockers have considerable clout. While the top 25 is full of household names like Paul McCartney and Billy Joel, the top 200 in North America, excluding nonmusic tours, is half rock acts, including bands like Muse, the xx and Deftones. In that ranking, rock still represents over half of revenue.

There are many reasons that rock remains so powerful on the road, including that, as an older genre, it had a head start on pop and rap. Giant tours by older rap icons like Jay-Z aren’t as common. Fans of newer hip-hop artists skew younger, including teens with less disposable cash, making festival gigs more economical than lengthy, sprawling tours.

Josh Dun and Tyler Joseph of Twenty One Pilots onstage in Los Angeles.
Josh Dun and Tyler Joseph of Twenty One Pilots onstage in Los Angeles. Photo: Getty Images

“Drake can do four Madison Square Garden shows, but Phish can do 17,” says Peter Shapiro, a New York-based independent concert promoter. Especially in the day-to-day business of clubs and theaters, rock bands, he adds, “still have a huge impact.”

Rock is also a big tent. There are touring veterans like My Morning Jacket and the Killers, which Jay Marciano, chief executive of concert-promotion giant AEG Presents, calls “the biggest unknown rock band”; older emo bands (Fall Out Boy); newer retro acts (Greta Van Fleet); jam bands (Lettuce); metal bands (Ghost); punk bands (Lee Bains III and the Glory Fires); along with indie rockers (Courtney Barnett), folk rockers (Avett Brothers) and Christian rockers (Casting Crowns, which grossed $12 million in North America last year).

Twenty One Pilots, a Columbus, Ohio, duo that incorporates rap, pop and reggae, is one of rock’s most commercially successful newcomers, graduating over the past seven years from 200-capacity rooms to 10,000- to 18,000-seat arenas.

‘It’s schizophrenic,’ says Phoebe Bridgers, who played at New York’s Forest Hills Stadium last weekend. ‘I’m small, but I get to open for big people.’
‘It’s schizophrenic,’ says Phoebe Bridgers, who played at New York’s Forest Hills Stadium last weekend. ‘I’m small, but I get to open for big people.’ Photo: Angela Owens/The Wall Street Journal

“Building a live business does not always align with what, on the surface, might be called ‘pop-culture’ success,” says Chris Woltman, Twenty One Pilots’ manager. “You are creating your own culture.”

Today’s rock acts may not fill the void when legendary acts like Elton John, U2 and Metallica call it quits. And it isn’t easy to make a living on the road. Smaller acts often lose money. If you tour too often, fans stop buying tickets.

Phoebe Bridgers, 24, a Los Angeles singer-songwriter, performed as a teenager at a farmers’ market in Pasadena, Calif., making $35 to $200 a day. Last year, “Motion Sickness,” one of her singles, won over critics. She shared a bill at a festival last month with the rock band the National. Next month, she starts a co-headlining tour with singer-songwriter Julien Baker.

“It’s schizophrenic,” she says. “I’m small, but I get to open for big people.”

Patterson Hood plays during the Drive-By Truckers show in Atlanta.
Patterson Hood plays during the Drive-By Truckers show in Atlanta. Photo: Melissa Golden for The Wall Street Journal

Messrs. Hood and Cooley, now in their 50s, first tried to be rock stars in Alabama in the late 1980s. This year they resurrected their original band, Adam’s House Cat, releasing a “lost” album in September and performing a few shows.

Drive-By Truckers, which they founded in 1996, toured relentlessly, playing as many as 250 shows a year and running four vans into the ground. In 2003, a few years after their 2001 breakthrough album, “Southern Rock Opera,” they upgraded to a bus.

The road took a toll on them, too. Band members fought, and some departed. Touring “has broken us a few times,” Mr. Hood says.

Now the group tours in three-week spurts so members can go home to their families. “I don’t want to be a shitty parent,” Mr. Hood says. “I may be about to play a show, but I’ll be answering an email from an eighth-grade math teacher.”

The 11 band and crew members pile into a single tour bus. It can be hard to find one’s shoe at times, Mr. Cooley says, but it’s rare everyone is awake.

“It’s not like being in a station wagon going to Disney World with your wife and kids,” he says.

Drive-By Truckers recently finished recording the follow-up to its 2016 album, “American Band,” but it isn’t planning to release it until next year. Messrs. Hood and Cooley are booked solid through the spring and need family time next summer.

“We’re too busy to put it out,” Mr. Hood says.

So far this year, the band’s ticket sales are up 10% over the same period in 2017.

In November, the Truckers play three nights at Saturn, a 525-capacity club in Birmingham, Ala., roughly 100 miles south of Florence, Ala., where Messrs. Hood and Cooley first shared an apartment in 1985. The next day, it’s back out on the road.

Write to Neil Shah at neil.shah@wsj.com

More in Music

Netflix Is Making A Chronicles Of Narnia TV Show

Big budget fantasy seems to be all the rage on the small screen, as HBO continues its commitment to Game of Thrones with plans for spinoffs, and Amazon is working on a Lord of the Rings series. Netflix already had a toe in the genre with Bright and its upcoming sequel, as well as Matt Groening’s Disenchantment, but now the streaming giant just sealed a deal with a juggernaut franchise in the fantasy genre. Netflix has joined forces with the C.S. Lewis Company and will develop new TV shows and films based on The Chronicles of Narnia.

The multi-year deal between the Netflix and C.S. Lewis company is a landmark agreement, and is the first time any one company has secured the rights to all seven books in The Chronicles of Narnia series at one time. Ted Sarandos noted the series lasting appeal as a reason for Netflix’s interest in the franchise, and stated that the streaming service will be the home for C.S. Lewis’ iconic works for years to come. Netflix will serve as the producer for each project, with Mark Gordon of Entertainment One, Douglas Gresham and Vincent Sieber serving as executive producers on each completed film or television show. Netflix chief content officer

As far as which books will be adapted into shows and which will be films, it’s not entirely clear at the moment. A year ago, it was reported that The Chronicles of Narnia films were making a comeback with The C.S. Lewis Company signing a deal with Tristar Pictures to adapt The Silver Chair. Any plans for that film might be scrapped now that Netflix is planning on adding the franchise to its original programming, especially considering the company has the rights to the entire shebang. Given that, it seems likely Netflix would like to shape the entire franchise around its own vision as opposed to using plans that may have been based or stylized after the previous film franchise.

Because Netflix acquired of all 7 books, it gives the company the opportunity to shape its adaptation of The Chronicles of Narnia in many ways. For example, it’s possible one specific part of a story could be drawn out over the course of a series, with one big moment taking place over the course of a film.

Another possibility is that a series could focus primarily on the story of the Pevensie children, Eustace, and Jill (whom a current Netflix star was once rumored to be portraying), while the books somewhat outside the main story like The Magicians Nephew and The Horse and his Boy could serve as standalone films. Netflix didn’t reveal how it plans to tackle the works but will have plenty of time to mull it over given the length of the deal and their lack of a timetable for when we should see one of the first projects.

The Chronicles of Narnia series and films are in development at Netflix, but audiences might have to wait a while to see them. Luckily, fall television is in full swing and there are plenty of shows premiering each and every day. Check out the latest of what television has to offer with our fall premiere guide.

Pop Quiz: What’s The Best Intro Song On An Album?

The TRL Pop Quiz works like this: our editors are posed a music-related question and have only 15 minutes and just 100 words to research, choose and explain their answers. This week’s question: what’s the best introductory/ opening track on an album?

Ariana Grande’s fourth album Sweetener just dropped, but I’d already call her intro track “Raindrops (An Angel Cried)” one of the most beautiful tracks… ever. A brief cover of “An Angel Cried” by The Four Seasons, the song is 38 seconds of acapella bliss highlighting Ariana’s soaring vocals. It sets the tone for Sweetener and even has a personal connection — her grandpa’s best friend wrote the song. Plus, with Ariana’s musical theatre roots, it’s fun to consider the fact that this song is featured in the Broadway musical Jersey Boys might also play a factor in her song choice. – Kristen Maldonado

“Gloria: In Excelsis Deo” from Patti Smith’s iconic album Horses is my favorite album opener. The track reimagines an existing song, “Gloria” by Them, and incorporates poems and previous works of Smith’s. Within the song, Patti plays with gender, religion and sexuality, setting up the punk tone of the rest of the album. The song has an arc, starting very slowly with just Patti’s voice and a piano, sounding a lot like a hymn (the title comes from a Catholic hymn). It gains speed, instruments and energy as it plays, and it’s an excellent preview for what’s to come. – Leah Williams

“Supermodel” is the hook to SZA‘s excellent debut CTRLboth as its stunningly bold opening track and the album’s thematic focal point. Over three airy minutes, she delivers dangerously careless kiss-offs (“I’ve been secretly banging your homeboy,”) demands explanation for being dumped (“Why am I so easy to forget like that?”) and dreads the oncoming isolation that greets singledom (“Wish I was comfortable just by myself / but I need you”). Those tension points of insecurity, loneliness and how those feelings can often lead to bad behavior weave through the entire album, but are honed brilliantly from the very beginning. – Terron Moore

I’ll start off by saying that “Self”, the first track on Noname’s album Room 25 has one of the best lines I’ve ever heard: “My p*ssy teachin’ ninth grade English / My p*ssy wrote a thesis on colonialism.” The song introduces her new maturity to her audience following her mixtape, Telefone. On “Self”, Noname raps about how people don’t believe she can rap and that she made this album for herself, not for anybody else. It does a good job of introducing the album as her coming-of-age story, talking about politics, musical success, sexual exploration and personal growth. – Landyn Pan

In less than 90 seconds, Tori Kelly prepares you for the next 50 minutes on “Where I Belong,” the opening song on Unbreakable Smile. “I’m just a girl with her guitar / trying to give you my whole heart,” Tori sings to open up her debut studio album, setting the stage for a no-holds-barred, acoustic soundtrack of her experiences with love, loss and fame. It’s clear that after four years of making music, Tori found a sweet spot with her sound and was doing things her own way, not to appease her label or anyone else. – Matt Gehring

“Lucky Star” isn’t just a great album opener; for some, it may have been their first moment hearing Madonna. On her self-titled debut, Madge delivered a decade-defining hit from the jump, kick-starting a career that produced countless more. The qualities that made her an icon are immediately recognizable in “Lucky Star”—her appeals to the dancefloor; the breezy, teasing vocals; her willingness to conflate the sacred with the sacrilegious. This didn’t just set the template for one of the best albums of the ‘80s (which it is); it signaled the emergence of arguably the most influential pop star in history. – Gus Turner

Longtime Criminal Minds DP Accused Of Groping Crew Members And Making Threats

Once again, troublesome reports have surfaced surrounding a hit CBS drama, as Criminal Minds‘ director of photography Greg St. Johns is facing an abundance of accusations from current and former crew members who say that St. Johns had a bad habit of groping people’s private parts, that he was overtly rude and confrontative on set, and that many people who put in official complaints were later fired. What’s more, the accusers claim that Criminal Minds‘ producers have dismissed or ignored the issues, even when saying that something would be done about it.

19 different former or current Criminal Minds crew members spoke with Variety about Greg St. Johns, and their claims painted a picture of a highly contentious workspace. While complaints against St. Johns go back to the show’s early years, it was in January that crew members from the show received an anonymous email stating that show producers had been contact the previous month about St. Johns’ alleged workplace behavior, and the email called out “inappropriate touching of genitalia, rear ends, verbal abuse.” It’s reported that employees from the different departments were terminated from their jobs. Not to mention other crew members who verbally expressed they wouldn’t be returning to the show due to St. Johns’ actions.

While it’s not known what came of it, an investigation was held in February by ABC Studios’ HR department, after which Greg St. Johns kept his job on Criminal Minds. Things got heated once again in April, when the show’s former digital imaging technician Tony Matulic filed an official complaint against both ABC Studios and the show’s payroll company Entertainment Partners, alleging that he was fired from the show over complaints made against St. Johns for allegedly grabbing Matulic’s buttocks. The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing then started up its own investigation into the matter.

Tony Matulic in particular claims that during his eight seasons on Criminal Minds, Greg St. Johns grabbed his butt once every couple of weeks, and that he also “frequently” grabbled Matulic’s inner thigh and flicked his nipples. Matulic claims St. Johns grabbed his genitalia once, and that he witnessed several other male crew members being touched in similar ways. He also said that the alleged sexual harassment behavior was actually a sign that St. Johns was in a good mood, pointing out that the DP’s bad moods made him verbally abusive and he would humiliate others as a way of bossing them around.

When Tony Matulic brought his discomfort up with Greg St. Johns during Season 12’s production, the director of photography was allegedly not pleased. By the end of the season, Matulic claims he was told he wasn’t being asked back for Season 13 that fall because St. Johns was said to have eliminated the job of digital imaging technician, even though the position is a regular one on many TV shows.

While Tony Matulic’s complaints against Greg St. Johns were the ones that sparked the most recent investigation, they’re just the tip of the iceberg. Many of the crew members interviewed alleged that they were touched below the belt by the employer, and that they witnessed others being pawed in the same way. One staffer said that during Season 11, he was standing near the crafts service table when St. Johns came up behind him and pulled his gym shorts down, revealing his backside and genitals to the crew members standing around. The staffer claims he complained about the incident later, and was subsequently fired, allegedly for not getting along with St. Johns.

CBS only recently fired former NCIS: New Orleans showrunner Brad Kern following an additional investigation into his allegedly volatile workplace behavior on that set and others. That, after CBS ousted former CEO Les Moonves was removed for his own set of allegations. Plus, CBS News recently fired longtime 60 Minutes producer Jeff Fager for telling one employee to “be careful” about how she covered the network’s ongoing scandals, saying that others before her had lost their jobs in trying to harm his reputation.

Sophie Turner and Joe Jonas Just Made Their Red Carpet Debut as a Couple

Sophie Turner and Joe Jonas have been dating for almost two years and engaged for one, but somehow, until this week, they had never walked a red carpet together. It was probably worth the wait, though, since they chose the perfect event to break this dry spell: the Louis Vuitton show at Paris Fashion Week on Tuesday evening (October 2), People reports.

The pair went all out for their red carpet walk, sporting coordinating outfits and sticking close to each other’s sides all night. Turner wore a velvet black shirt with a gold design and a tie-front waist, a gray miniskirt, black leather thigh-high boots, and a gray handbag. Jonas, meanwhile, dressed up in a black mock-neck shirt under a crisply tailored gray suit.

After their fashionable night out, the lovebirds both took to Instagram to celebrate making it red carpet official. Turner posted a photo of the pair at dinner, with Jonas pulling her close and kissing the side of her head, writing, “With my love in Paris.” Jonas posted the same pic, plus another in which he’s facing the camera, and captioned the set with the French flag and red heart emojis.

sophie turner joe jonas 1

PHOTO: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

sophie turner joe jonas 2

PHOTO: Jacopo Raule/Getty Images

This month marks one year since the lovebirds announced their engagement. And it might be a bit longer before they actually walk down the aisle, since Jonas recently shared that they’re not in any rush to tie the knot, choosing instead to prioritize exploring the world together. “We’ve been trying to take some time off while running around Europe. It’s been really exciting to play shows here in the summer, when people are out and about and the energy is top-notch. So right now, as far as down-time for us, we’re just being tourists,” he told The Evening Standard in June.

Turner, too, seems pretty content with staying engaged for the foreseeable future. “I’m still like, ‘Holy sh*t! I’m engaged,'” she told Marie Claire earlier this year. “It’s lovely to be engaged. Not like I achieved anything, but I found my person, like I’d find a house that I love and want to stay in forever. There’s a sense of peace that comes with finding your person. But there’s a drive that comes with your career.”

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Blumhouse’s Halloween Really Thought Out Its Violence

The horror genre has been on a serious roll for the past few years, as new and challenging properties have hit theaters, and become both critical and box offices successes. Many of these hits come from Blumhouse Productions, including Get Out, Split, and The Conjuring franchise. Now, Blumhouse is turning its focus to the classics, with a new Halloween movie arriving in theaters in a matter of weeks. The upcoming slasher will be a canon-defying new sequel, with Jamie Lee Curtis and John Carpenter both returning in various capacities. One question fans seem especially curious about is how violent the R-rated project will be. While the original had almost no gore, the Rob Zombie movies relied heavily on it. Producer Jason Blum recently spoke to the violence in Halloween, and how carefully it was crafted, saying:

Hillary Clinton Thinks Brett Kavanaugh’s ‘Revenge’ Comment Is Pretty Hilarious

Hillary Clinton addressed comments that Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh made during Senate Judiciary Committee hearings last week, when he alleged that the multiple sexual misconduct accusations leveled against him were a “political hit” and a revenge plot being carried out “on behalf of the Clintons.”

On Tuesday at the The Atlantic Festival in Washington, D.C., Clinton immediately met the conspiracy theories with laughter and called Kavanaugh’s behavior “defensive.”

“It deserves a lot of laughter,” she said through laughs. “I wasn’t watching when he said that; I was having to be somewhere else and away from a TV and even my phone. And so I heard about it later. I thought it was just part of the whole of his very defensive and unconvincing presentation. And I told someone later, ‘Boy, I’ll tell you, they give us a lot of credit.'”

She suggested that the timing makes the idea that the Clintons were behind the allegations even more improbable. “Thirty-six years ago, we started this against him?” she said sarcastically. “Even before, in high school apparently.”

Kavanaugh is accused of sexually assaulting Christine Blasey Ford in 1982, when they were both in high school. Both shared their testimony at a widely publicized hearing last week that divided the nation. Kavanaugh appeared emotional and irate as he made several comments—among them the Clinton conspiracy claims—that many believed to be unprofessional political rhetoric for a judge. The hearings ended with Senator Jeff Flake dramatically calling for an FBI investigation into the alleged attack, which suspended the confirmation vote for a week.

Clinton shared that she found Ford’s story “very credible” and said she felt proud of the professor of psychology’s willingness to go public.

“You have to ask yourself, ‘Why would anybody put themselves through this if they did not believe that they had important information to convey to the Senate?'” she said. “She basically said that she thought it was her civic duty. So I found her presentation, I found her willingness to say ‘I don’t remember that but I remember this’ to be very convincing. And I felt a great swell of pride that she would be willing to put herself out there under these circumstances.”

Clinton’s praises came the same day that Trump mocked Ford’s credibility at a rally in Mississippi.

“I had one beer. Well, do you think it was — nope, it was one beer,” Trump said, mimicking Ford. “How did you get home? I don’t remember. How’d you get there? I don’t remember. Where is the place? I don’t remember. How many years ago was it? I don’t know.”

Kavanaugh is also accused of misconduct by two other women. The FBI is concluding their investigation, which could wrap up as early as today.

MORE: Watch Donald Trump Publicly Mock Christine Blasey Ford at Mississippi Rally