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Chinese Film Advocates Aren’t Fond Of Bohemian Rhapsody’s Censorship

Bohemian Rhapsody is undeniably one of the biggest hits of the last year. Bryan Singer’s Freddie Mercury biopic may have had some controversy surrounding it, but the musical blockbuster ultimately made a ton of money at the box office, and was an Awards Season favorite. Unfortunately, some controversy continues, especially as the project was brought to China for the first time.

In order for Bohemian Rhapsody to hit theaters for Chinese moviegoers, the movie was edited down, with scenes and dialogue regarding Freddie Mercury’s sexuality cut. It’s a change that drew criticism online, especially as certain moviegoers already thought the movie didn’t focus on Mercury’s queerness enough. And now film advocates in China are responding as well.

LGBT advocate and cinephiles Peng Yanzi recently spoke to the Associated Press about the choice to edit down Bohemian Rhapsody, and what it did to the movie. The report was:

Aside from ignoring an important aspect of the subject of Bohemian Rhapsody, it looks like these new edits may have affected the film overall. Freddie Mercury’s journey in the biopic was about music and self-discovery. And cutting out his coming out process means that a big aspect of that narrative was absent from Bohemian Rhapsody.

Another Chinese moviegoer and LGBT advocate addressed the changes to Bohemian Rhapsody, and how the editing affected the quality of the overall movie. They said:

Bohemian Rhapsody might not have been a gay love story, but Freddie Mercury’s sexuality is the unspoken elephant in the room for most of the biopic. Still, there are a few extremely poignant scenes that occur later in the film, as Mercury’s starpower is on the rise. His relationship with girlfriend Mary Austin was shown slowly dissolving, and eventually Lucy Boynton’s character opens the dialogue about his sexuality. That scene is one of many to get the cut for the Chinese release, and it appears the movie is worse for it.

As a reminder, you can check out that scene below.

The above sequence is one of the most powerful and emotional in the entirety of Bohemian Rhapsody. In fact, it’s hard to even imagine a version of the film lacking this plot line, and this powerful moment between the two real-life figures.

It should be interesting to see how Bohemian Rhapsody ultimately performs overseas. There’s obviously a ton of hype around the project, after taking so many trophies. But will the new edit ruin it? We’ll have to see. In the meantime, be sure to check out our 2019 release list to plan your next trip to the movies.

Breast Implants Are Linked to Cancer—And Women Are Demanding the FDA Do More

Getting breast implants is a highly personal choice. Whether you find them genuinely empowering or find more power in being au natural, women should be informed of the risks—especially since breast implants are linked to cancer. Now, women are demanding the FDA step up.

Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration agreed during a public hearing that the agency needs to do more to warn women of the risks of breast implants after hearing powerful testimonies from women like, Jamee Cook, a former ER paramedic turned patient advocate. She shared that she dealt with serious complications for years: swollen lymph nodes, killer migraines, constant fatigue and even a low-grade fever, the Washington Post reported. “I was not warned,” about the risks, she told the committee, despite the fact that women have been reporting problems like this after getting implants since the 1960s.

There’s an even more serious risk associated with breast implants: cancer. The link between certain types of breast implants and cancer is long-established—in 2011 the FDA identified a possible connection between implants and a heightened risk of a rare immune system cancer called anaplastic large cell lymphoma (or breast implant associated ALCL). At the time, the data was too thin to deter many women (or doctors), but a few more years of research proved the connection—in 2016, the World Health Organization confirmed the link.

This outcome is still pretty rare—so far, the FDA has identified 457 cases of BIA-ALCL in the U.S.—but with over 300,000 women getting breast implants each year, boosting awareness of the risks is vital to women’s health.

Current efforts by the FDA are a little limp; the agency advises plastic surgeons to warn women about the risks by providing them with educational materials from implant manufacturers and consider screening for cancers if a patient reports problems with her implants. But is that enough? Advocates at the hearing called for an outright ban on textured implants, which are most frequently associated with BIA-ALCL. At the very least, women deserve an on-the-box warning.

After this week’s hearing, the FDA says it will make a stronger effort to warn women that breast implants are linked to cancer and may come with other health risks, though exactly what that will entail remains to be seen. In the meantime, women will keep fighting.

Jordan Peele Says He Isn’t Interested In Casting A White Dude As The Lead In His Movies

Jordan Peele’s movies have a lot that set them apart from the pack, but one of the most obvious is the fact that, in the cases of both Get Out and Us, the lead characters were African-American. In a Hollywood that is still largely focused on white men, Peele’s movies are an anomaly, but the director doesn’t expect that he’ll ever make a movie with a lead actor that looks like so many other lead actors, for the simple reason that it happens so frequently. According to Peele…

While Hollywood diversity is always improving, the vast majority of films still star white dudes. Beyond the simple benefits of diversity, the fact is that Jordan Peele’s movies standout because they aren’t simply another movie about a white guy. The relationship between black people and the horror genre specifically is such that it is often the subject of jokes. Peele’s interest in making horror films with black actors means that he gets to battle these tropes and give the entire genre a new look.

And for Peele, it isn’t that he simply likes to cast black people. In Get Out especially, the fact that the main character is black is a key part of the story. It simply doesn’t work any other way.

And if you’re worried, the position of white people in Jordan Peele’s movies is improving. In Get Out they were evil, but in Us, they’re not the bad guys, they’re just assholes.

At the same time, the writer/director told a group of students at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater (via THR) that he also wants to cast black people in his films because he’s in a unique position to be able to do so…

For a director who has only made two movies, Jordan Peele has had an incredible amount of success. His first movie won him an Academy Award for writing and his second movie is now the hottest thing at the box office. The fact is that other filmmakers could potentially have trouble casting minorities in major roles in movies because there’s frequently a feeling that can limit a movie’s appeal, but nobody is going to tell Jordan Peele no at this point. One hopes that Peele’s success will help open the door to others, as he is helping to shatter those Hollywood casting myths.

To be fair, Jordan Peele simply says he doesn’t see himself casting a white actor in a lead role because he’s seen the movie before. If he came up with a way to do it that we hadn’t seen before it could happen. Still, Peele’s movies are terrifying and provocative just the way he makes them, so I’m certainly not hoping for a major shift any time soon.

Could Captain Marvel Hit A Billion Dollars This Weekend?

Captain Marvel has gone higher, further and faster than many of Marvel’s other superheroes, at least where box office is involved. The movie is already well over the $900 million week after hitting theaters earlier this month, but will it be able to hit 1 billion this weekend? It’ll be close.

First and foremost, as of March 25, Captain Marvel has already pulled in a whopping $914 million dollars worldwide (via Box Office Mojo). Box office numbers typically slow down earlier in the way and pick up closer to the weekend, so once Monday and Tuesday’s numbers are official, I’d expect it to add to the tally but not get us close to the billion dollar mark yet.

Which brings us to this weekend. Domestically, Captain Marvel is facing the behemoth that is Jordan Peele’s Us. Disney itself will also enter a bit of competition into the fold this weekend with its live action Dumbo remake spearheaded by director Tim Burton.

Last weekend, Captain Marvel earned $35 million domestically, which was definitely enough for second place, but earned well below Us, which opened to $70.3 million. It’s likely that Captain Marvel’s numbers will drop domestically again, although it should do well enough that it should make a few million to add to that over $900 million total.

The worldwide box office has contributed much of the box office intake for Captain Marvel and that likely will continue into the weekend. However, Captain Marvel has already previously opened in most major markets, including China.

It has also opened in Mexico, South Korea, The UK, Brazil, France and other markets, so there’s not a lot of room for the movie to continue to squeeze out top dollar overseas. Just like the domestic market, as new and exciting movies hit theaters, the audience for older movies wanes.

The question really isn’t if Captain Marvel will be able to hit $1 billion worldwide, but when. There’s a chance the Marvel flick flies to that record this weekend, which would mean the movie has hit that box office milestone before it has even been in theaters for a whole month. However, it’s going to be close, and I think it may fall short over the weekend.

The good news is that once Captain Marvel hits a billion, it will actually be the seventh Marvel flick to achieve that massive number, so it will be big news when it happens. It should also be the start of a giant box office tally for Marvel in 2019, as the studio also has Avengers: Endgame coming. That movie should open high and could go on to make over $2 billion for Disney. Spider-Man: Far From Home and it’s complicated infrastructure with Sony and Disney will also be released in 2019.

If you’d like to see the movie get there sooner rather than later, you can always catch it in theaters this weekend, perhaps even for a second or third time.

Sky Ferreira Is Back And Gloomier Than Ever On ‘Downhill Lullaby’

For the first time in six years, Sky Ferreira rises – in darkness. Her grand return is the gloomy “Downhill Lullaby,” a long, sensual, bleeding episode of malaise. Its dark nature is sexy and at times, punishing. It makes sense that it will appear on her upcoming album Masochism, which is defined as “the tendency to derive pleasure, especially sexual gratification, from one’s own pain or humiliation.” Sky Ferreira is back with a vengeance and her canine teeth are fanged.

Close your eyes, raise your hands in the air – slowly. Feel the gentle wind of early spring bristling the hairs on your arms and neck. Relax as foreign hands run from your neck down to your chest. “Downhill Lullaby” is slow and sexy; it takes a full minute for the tune to get out of its stretched out string introduction stage. Each rim flick is calculated. Ferreira’s voice comes floating into the air like it’s kitchen steam from under a closed door. It demands the floor softly and expands.

Her voice has never sounded better. There’s a darkness in its soothing hands that massage the nape the shoulders relax. Just as it grows in presence, it retracts and grows again. Her words slice the skin bloody raw (“You ripped me open/Then you kiss me/Blue lips and roses/That you left me”) and you’re left to lick the wounds when she disappears into the drowning bass line that centers the song. It’s a transfixing mess, a perfect reintroduction that creates a new atmosphere untethered to the past. It’s a powerfully dark fog, but it’s one that she thrives in.

Sky Ferreira recently revealed in her Pitchfork cover story that “Downhill Lullaby” was produced by Twin Peaks music supervisor Dean Hurley and also features strings from Danish violinist Nils Gröndahl. She also previewed another new track, called (for now) “Don’t Forget.” Both tracks will appear on her forthcoming, oft-delayed Masochism LP that looks to finally be on the horizon.

Check out the slowing, intoxicating record above.

Hellboy Producer Explains The Whitewashing Controversy

It’s no secret that superhero movies are everywhere. Comic book adaptations have proven to be most profitable and wildly popular genre in the business, so plenty of studios are trying to get in on the action. This includes reboots, as nostalgia continues to be a driving force in the film world. Lionsgate is doing just that with the upcoming Hellboy movie, which will be totally disconnected to the original pair of Guillermo del Toro movies.

Hellboy has some anticipation leading up to its release, but the film’s development wasn’t without controversy. When the cast was being assembled, actor Ed Skrein was cast as Major Ben Daimio, who is Japanese in the comics. This sparked a ton of backlash, with Lost favorite Daniel Dae Kim eventually stepping in to play the role instead. Now producer Lloyd Levin recently spoke of the decision to recast, saying:

Nobody’s perfect, and it looks like the folks behind the Hellboy reboot recognized their mistake. They may have originally been a cast of whitewashing, but the blockbuster course corrected, and brought in a more appropriate actor to play Major Ben Daimio.

Lloyd Levin’s comments to Collider show how quickly things changed when Hellboy‘s cast was being assembled. While the blockbuster’s story was ready and the character Ben Daimio was given his own narrative, they forgot a major detail: his race. The call for inclusion onscreen has been a major conversation in the entertainment industry for the past few years. It’s this new awareness (and some fan backlash) that helped Levin and his colleagues realize their mistake. Enter Daniel Dae Kim.

Whitewashing has been one aspect of the larger conversation regarding representation in the media. It’s an issue that seems to have his Asian actors the worst, a subject that was broached during Sandra Oh’s Golden Globes opening monologue. Scarlett Johansson got a ton of hate for taking the lead in Ghost in the Shell, while Tilda Swinton faced backlash for playing The Ancient One in Doctor Strange. So when it looked like Hellboy was going to follow suit, the public quickly took to social media to express their outrage.

It should be interesting to see how Ben Daimio functions within the story of Hellboy, as it’s the first time the character will be brought to live-action. All will be revealed when Hellboy arrives in theaters on April 12, 2019. In the meantime, check out our 2019 release list to plan your next trip to the movies.

The 15 Best Bras for Small Breasts | How to Shop for Bras

I can count the number of times in my life that I’ve gone bra shopping on one hand. I’m 31, with two kids—and discounting my early teens, when a lacy and ill-fitting Victoria’s Secret bra was what I thought I needed to impress a boy (judge me if you will, I was 15), I never saw the need for one. I’m as flat as they come, and I’ve never had any success filling out an actual cup. For most of my life, I’ve been going without, and I’ve been mostly OK with that, but there are limitations: Sometimes I just want to be able to wear a thin white tee without feeling exposed when going to meetings at my children’s school or with editors. Up until this point, I’d amassed a collection of horrid stretch bras (basically training bras marketed to girls over the age of 12) to wear in these situations, but I needed something more. I needed a “real” bra.

A friend who owns a lingerie store in Brooklyn opened my eyes to an emerging trend in lingerie: petite sizing. This growing category aims to provide solutions to common fit issues people with smaller busts often experience, such as a need for shape, ill-fitting straps, and gaping cups. And, like we’ve seen in the offerings for DD+, a host of brands have popped up catering to this customer—companies including Lula Lu Petites and The Little Bra Company, which adjust the cuts of their bands and the size of the cups so that they actually support your boobs how you need them to. (They’ve even created smaller cups, such as 28AAA; and some companies, like ThirdLove, offer half sizes.) What that means for us? No more sizing down arbitrarily, or going without simply because you feel there’s no other option.

Glamour polled some of the best petite lingerie experts in the biz for their tips and tricks for finding that long-desired fit. They reminded us of the importance of getting fit regularly and not simply picking out the same size because you’ve worn it before (these can vary among brands!), but also offered some interesting tidbits and suggestions for bra shopping when you have small boobs. Ahead, check out insight from Rachel Klein, owner of Lula Lu Petites; Emily Lau, founder of The Little Bra Company; Mette Iacovou, “amBRAsador” at Bare Necessities; Elma Valerio, founder of Elma Shop; Hannah Casanova, fit specialist at Dana-Co (which manufactures Natori and Skarlett Blue); and Caroline Peaslee, global merchandise manager at Cosabella.

Yes, bra support matters…: I long assumed that because I didn’t have big boobs, a bra didn’t need to offer lift or support (which is a huge consideration when you have a larger bust), but experts say that one could benefit from the design considerations of a bra, such as wide bands and padding, for one simple reason: gravity. According to Lau and Casanova, even the tiniest amount of breast tissue will eventually stretch and sag, and a well-fit bra can help prevent that. This doesn’t necessarily have to translate to underwire: Valerio notes that support should depend on how your breast tissue sits; people whose breasts are bigger on the bottom, for instance, could get ample support from a longline bra or a wider band, while those who are fuller at the sides might find that a bra with a wider back with three sets of hooks provides the optimal fit.

…as does the spacing of the cups on a bra: So much of the bra shopping process hinges on the size (or letter) of the cup—but, according to the experts, the key to getting the best fit might actually be in how the cups are spaced out on a bra. If your breasts are set wider apart, for example (which is often the case for smaller chests, per Valerio and Klein), a bra with touching cups isn’t great; instead seek out a style where the cups have a one-inch gap between them, to ensure that they’re sitting right over the breast instead of toward the center.

Don’t sleep on the bralette trend: Bralettes are ideal for people with small boobs not only because they’re seriously comfortable and don’t have underwire, but also because the silhouette frames the natural shape of the breast. “The triangle cup tends to be the most flattering for a smaller chest just because it’s the smallest cup type,” Valerio explains. Plus, they just so happen to be trending right now, which makes finding them seriously easy. Stock up on ’em now!

Ahead, a collection of bras, handpicked by the experts for all of your small-chested needs.

The Best Bras for Small Breasts: How to Shop for Lingerie

I can count the number of times in my life that I’ve gone bra shopping on one hand. I’m 31, with two kids—and discounting my early teens, when a lacy and ill-fitting Victoria’s Secret bra was what I thought I needed to impress a boy (judge me if you will, I was 15), I never saw the need for one. I’m as flat as they come, and I’ve never had any success filling out an actual cup. For most of my life, I’ve been going without, and I’ve been mostly OK with that, but there are limitations: Sometimes I just want to be able to wear a thin white tee without feeling exposed when going to meetings at my children’s school or with editors. Up until this point, I’d amassed a collection of horrid stretch bras (basically training bras marketed to girls over the age of 12) to wear in these situations, but I needed something more. I needed a “real” bra.

A friend who owns a lingerie store in Brooklyn opened my eyes to an emerging trend in lingerie: petite sizing. This growing category aims to provide solutions to common fit issues people with smaller busts often experience, such as a need for shape, ill-fitting straps, and gaping cups. And, like we’ve seen in the offerings for DD+, a host of brands have popped up catering to this customer—companies including Lula Lu Petites and The Little Bra Company, which adjust the cuts of their bands and the size of the cups so that they actually support your boobs how you need them to. (They’ve even created smaller cups, such as 28AAA; and some companies, like ThirdLove, offer half sizes.) What that means for us? No more sizing down arbitrarily, or going without simply because you feel there’s no other option.

Glamour polled some of the best petite lingerie experts in the biz for their tips and tricks for finding that long-desired fit. They reminded us of the importance of getting fit regularly and not simply picking out the same size because you’ve worn it before (these can vary among brands!), but also offered some interesting tidbits and suggestions for bra shopping when you have small boobs. Ahead, check out insight from Rachel Klein, owner of Lula Lu Petites; Emily Lau, founder of The Little Bra Company; Mette Iacovou, “amBRAsador” at Bare Necessities; Elma Valerio, founder of Elma Shop; Hannah Casanova, fit specialist at Dana-Co (which manufactures Natori and Skarlett Blue); and Caroline Peaslee, global merchandise manager at Cosabella.

Yes, bra support matters…: I long assumed that because I didn’t have big boobs, a bra didn’t need to offer lift or support (which is a huge consideration when you have a larger bust), but experts say that one could benefit from the design considerations of a bra, such as wide bands and padding, for one simple reason: gravity. According to Lau and Casanova, even the tiniest amount of breast tissue will eventually stretch and sag, and a well-fit bra can help prevent that. This doesn’t necessarily have to translate to underwire: Valerio notes that support should depend on how your breast tissue sits; people whose breasts are bigger on the bottom, for instance, could get ample support from a longline bra or a wider band, while those who are fuller at the sides might find that a bra with a wider back with three sets of hooks provides the optimal fit.

…as does the spacing of the cups on a bra: So much of the bra shopping process hinges on the size (or letter) of the cup—but, according to the experts, the key to getting the best fit might actually be in how the cups are spaced out on a bra. If your breasts are set wider apart, for example (which is often the case for smaller chests, per Valerio and Klein), a bra with touching cups isn’t great; instead seek out a style where the cups have a one-inch gap between them, to ensure that they’re sitting right over the breast instead of toward the center.

Don’t sleep on the bralette trend: Bralettes are ideal for people with small boobs not only because they’re seriously comfortable and don’t have underwire, but also because the silhouette frames the natural shape of the breast. “The triangle cup tends to be the most flattering for a smaller chest just because it’s the smallest cup type,” Valerio explains. Plus, they just so happen to be trending right now, which makes finding them seriously easy. Stock up on ’em now!

Ahead, a collection of bras, handpicked by the experts for all of your small-chested needs.

Shazam! Producer Calls The Marvel And DC Rivalry ‘Bullshit’

Marvel and DC Comics have been business rival for decades. It makes sense. The two companies are in the same business of publishing comic books, largely about superheroes. Now, both companies are making movies about those same superheroes. While the competition may make sense from a business standpoint, Peter Safran, producer of the upcoming Shazam!, doesn’t think the rivalry ever needs to extend to fans. He thinks fans of superhero comic books have more in common than they realize, which goes beyond the label on the book, and he’s got some pretty strong words for those that disagree.

As an example of this, Safran points out that director James Gunn is getting ready to helm both a DC movie (The Suicide Squad) and a Marvel movie (Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3). For him, this is a prime example that both sides of this debate can get along. According to the producer…

It seems that picking sides is an intrinsic part of being a fan of something, whether people are drawing a line between comic book characters or video game consoles. Once a person chooses to invest emotionally or financially in one thing, defending it against attacks from the other side becomes part of being a fan. That’s certainly the case in the classic Marvel/DC rivalry which has now spilled over into the the cinematic universes that both companies have created. It seems like most people, or at least the most vocal, have chosen which one they love, and have written off the other.

However, as Peter Safran tells Uproxx, there might be a crack in the wall between Marvel and DC. Zachary Levi actually had a small role in Marvel’s Thor franchise before he became the title character of Shazam!, but now, we have the first director who will make films in both franchises.

It was an interesting turn of events when James Gunn was removed from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3, only to eventually find his way to writing and directing the second Suicide Squad movie. It certainly made sense, both were comic book movies that focused on a team of dysfunctional heroes. However, things took an even stranger turn when we learned that Gunn had been hired back by Disney and would actually direct both films, one after the other.

People will always need to make choices with their entertainment dollars and not everybody is going to be able to afford to go see every comic book superhero movie in the theaters. In that case, choices must be made, and one might decide to spend their money on one cinematic universe exclusively over the other. But even then, there’s no reason you can’t also be a fan of the other. Having a favorite superhero doesn’t mean you can’t also like all the other ones, regardless of which brand they’re associated with.

Tatcha The Silk Canvas Primer Makes My Skin Look Airbrushed – Review

I’ll be the first to admit I’ve never really gotten the point of primer. I’ve understood what’s it’s supposed to do in theory: it’s the glue between your makeup and your face that’s meant to keep everything locked in place and shine-free. But in reality, it just never seemed like it made that much of a difference. I’ve long been a fan of Laura Mercier’s Tinted Moisturizer (the finish it gives is perfect), and didn’t want to add yet another step to my daily makeup routine. So I’ve happily gone about getting ready without it for years.

Then Tatcha’s The Silk Canvas Primer came along.

For anyone unfamiliar, Tatcha consistently gets reviews as glowing as Meghan Markle’s skin. (Which is probably unsurprising given her longtime friend and makeup artist Daniel Martin is an ambassador of the brand, and that the Duchess herself has credited her radiance to the brand’s Rice Enzyme Powder.) Everyone who’s tried its new Dewy Cream moisturizer says it makes your skin look like a dewy dumpling. It’s Water Cream sold out multiple times at Sephora. So even despite my skepticism, when The Silk Canvas Primer dropped, I felt the impulse to buy it (the fact that it looks like an adorable pink marshmallow cake also didn’t hurt).

What makes this primer feel special from the get-go is that it comes with small disk for application. I’m convinced it’s to prevent people from diving in for a handful of the silky cream, which I was honestly tempted to do myself. Instead I behaved, resisted sticking my face in the tub and used the disk for portion control. It has a line on the back side that indicates how much of the product you should be using—about a dime-sized dollop—which I promptly scooped up on the back of my hand.

The trick is to resist the urge to slather it all over your face. Martin suggests first starting with your T-zone (where most people need the most shine control) and working it out with your fingers. “You don’t want to use it everywhere—only where you need it,” he says. “You want your natural glow to come through.” Obviously if you’re Markle you have a lot of glow (they don’t call it the Markle Sparkle for nothing), but I have to agree with Martin. My favorite thing about the primer is how big the payoff is for so little product application.

It’s ability to blur away pores is also immediate. I tried using it over a big pimple once, and although the primer didn’t completely conceal it, it definitely helped fade the redness. The same can be said for my dark eye circles—the primer helps dull them and brightens up my under eye area. It’s also so lightweight, it barely feels like anything is on. I’d almost forget if it weren’t for every time I look in the mirror I’m amazed by how bright and airbrushed my skin looks. It’s like the Paris filter come to life.

After religiously applying The Silk Canvas Primer everyday, I noticed that people started to compliment me more and more on my “natural glow” and “perfect skin.” And though I’m lucky to have never had problematic skin, I’m always quick to point out the look isn’t completely natural and that primer really isn’t bullshit. Well, at least Tatcha’s isn’t.

Buy Now: Tatcha The Silk Canvas Protective Primer, $52, Tatcha. Check out all 214 winners from this year’s Glamour Beauty Awards, here.

Tara Gonzalez is the commerce editor at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram at @tarigonzalez.