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More Layoffs Coming To Disney And Fox After Merger

As Disney continues to merge the 21st Century Fox organization into its existing structure, it’s being reported that another round of significant layoffs are taking place. This time, layoffs are hitting both sides of the fence, with people within both the previous Fox company as well as Walt Disney Studios employees being cut. While no official statement has been made by Disney, the divisions that handle marketing, publicity, and domestic film distribution are expected to be the ones facing the biggest cuts.

It’s too surprising to see cuts to these particular divisions happening now. It was just about 10 days ago that Walt Disney Studios released an updated release calendar, the first to include Fox projects. Making this decision was a major priority for the new company, and now that it was made, Disney knows exactly what its needs in the realm of distribution and marketing will be, and with that information, it knows how many employees will actually be needed. Clearly not as many as it has.

The Fox studio used to release a dozen or more movies in a year when it was a separate company, but is set to release only nine in 2020. Disney CEO Bob Iger says that he expects Fox will produce something life five to six films a year once things get settled. Clearly, with a reduction like that, there are going to be fewer employees needed to do the work of distribution and marketing those films.

We saw a first significant round of layoffs on March 21. The acquisition of Fox had been made official earlier that month. Those cuts reportedly were exclusive to the Fox side of the business, so this appears to be the first round of layoffs to have a significant impact on existing Disney cast members.

While the Disney/Fox merger may have some exciting possibilities when it comes to content, there are downsides from every other perspective. Having one fewer major studio will simply reduce the number of movies being made, which means fewer voices getting a chance to have their stories heard. It also means fewer people working in general, as these layoffs show.

The purchase of Fox in the first place was designed to make Disney more competitive in a modern media marketplace. Disney is launching the Disney+ streaming service in November and the Fox owned content like National Geographic adds to the depth of material the service will be able to provide.

At the same time, Disney has to keep its costs down as much as possible in order to remain as profitable as possible. Disney has already said that Disney+ will actually be a money loser in the short term of the next couple of years. Those loses will need to be offset by gains elsewhere, and that means keeping costs down at the movie studio.

Variety reports that the total number of layoffs could reach as many as 4,000 people before it’s all over. We don’t even know how many have been given the pink slip yet, so that means we also don’t know how many more times this is going to happen.

The 9 Best Zombie Movies That Feel Really Realistic

The living dead begin to prey at night

What is scarier than a machete-wielding maniac in a hockey mask or an abandoned mansion where vengeful spirits lurk? If you ask me, zombies are the most horrifying concept in horror cinema and zombie movies are among some of the finest in the genre.

Some may ask, “Why? How does the idea of a hungry, rotting corpse suffering from rigor mortis sound scary? It’s completely impossible!”

Not to say that these naysayers are wrong, and even television shows (see The Walking Dead), exploring the concept of the rise of the undead have provided thought-provoking looks at how society is consumed by chaos, widespread hysterics, senseless violence, and our own loss of humanity. So, while the supernatural plot device may not be as convincing, the message is shockingly believable.

Through generations of zombie movies from the works of George A. Romero to Jim Jarmusch’s upcoming The Dead Don’t Die, what cinematic tale of gore and survival challenges our beliefs most effectively? I have picked eight iconic creature features (and one franchise that you could probably guess) and rank them by how realistically they imagine a world that has been overrun by the dead.

A Nazi finds that he enjoys life as a zombie-like creature

9. Overlord (2018)

Gamers all over the world eyed this J.J. Abrams-produced gem with ecstatic anticipation that they were finally seeing the film adaptation of the zombie-inspired levels of Call of Duty they had dreamed of. As it turns out, it is not the Army vs. undead splatterfest they expected, but that is essentially what helps Overlord maintain some shred of plausibility.

As a twist on true accounts of human experimentation by the Third Reich during World War II, Overlord follows a small group of American soldiers who discover the Nazis’ scientific approach to achieve immortality has spawned horrifying results.

The film is more war than gore, with references to reanimated corpses and violent mutants appearing less frequently than traditional armed combat, but a zombie outbreak on the eve of D-Day would have had you shaking your head, saying, “That never happened.” Overlord keeps it covert without beating you over the head with its horror elements, resulting in a WWII fantasy more believable, at least, than Inglourious Basterds.

Speaking of Brad Pitt…

Brad Pitt is a reluctant soldier in a war branded 'Z'

8. World War Z (2013)

Author Max Brooks stated in the documentary Doc of the Dead that zombies do not scare him; he is not convinced by the idea of cannibalistic reanimated corpses at all. What does scare him is the concept of a virus powerful enough to create widespread mania and destroy humanity as we know it.

Max Brooks took that approach to his novel, World War Z, framed as an oral history of an epidemic turning people into ravenous, flesh-craving mutants, which producer and star Brad Pitt made into this action-packed disaster flick.

The film manages to treat the subject matter maturely, not treating its zombie themes as excuses for gore or even going for the apocalyptic aftermath route. Instead, it puts you right into the middle of the event, as Pitt’s United Nations investigator struggles to figure out the cause and, hopefully, the cure for this international catastrophe, while also serving up potent political commentary.

However, I cannot say I find mindless flesh-eaters smart enough to climb a several-hundred foot wall particularly realistic, so it loses points there.

Simon Pegg and company try to be convincing zombies

7. Shaun Of The Dead (2004)

Despite being pretty straightforward, Edgar Wright’s Shaun of the Dead still managed to become one of the most iconic movies of the zombie genre. The key to Shaun of the Dead‘s success, and its realism, may be its highly relatable characters.

Shaun (co-writer Simon Pegg) and Ed (Nick Frost) are a couple of average slackers who are far from prepared to take on a horde of undead overrunning London, leading them to make some very bad decisions as they struggle to avoid the fate of the infected. But how can you blame them?

The characters’ ill-advised efforts only make them more authentic and, while they also serve as setups for some memorably hilarious moments, they lead to heartbreaking consequences that make you wonder why you were laughing in the first place. People are dying here!

This zombie is angry he missed the train

6. Train To Busan (2016)

The Korean horror extravaganza Train to Busan may be the most potent example in recent memory of the key elements of a perfect zombie movie: relentless terror, critical thinking, and a heart.

A divorced businessman (Yoo-Gong) is taking his daughter (Su-an Kim) on a train from Seoul to Busan to visit her mother when a woman infected by a mysterious virus comes aboard. Infection breaks out as the passengers find themselves trapped in a mobile fight for survival.

Train to Busan is a brainy, highly entertaining, no-holds-barred gore fest that is not for the faint of heart, but the scariest thing about the film is not the cannibalistic monsters just one train car away. It is the constant dread of being caught in uncontrollable chaos and the lengths one must go to protect loved ones and even strangers alike.

The night has not been kind to this TV reporter

5. [Rec] (2007)

Before the found footage horror trend took its time running itself into the ground, many credit this Spanish-language thriller as the genre’s peak of brilliance.

[Rec] follows a young television reporter and (Manuela Velasco) her cameraman (Pablo Rosso) who become trapped inside an apartment building experiencing an outbreak of a deadly virus turning its victims into hunters and the uninfected into their prey.

Directors Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza use the found footage method as an effective way to authenticate [Rec]’s horror elements and take advantage of its singular internal setting to provide the audience with a first-hand, claustrophobic experience that feels almost too real to handle.

Colin finds himself having an unusual appetite all of the sudden

4. Colin (2008)

Zombie movies are always concerned with how the living deal with the dead. This low budget British thriller asks the question, “How do the dead deal with being dead?”

Alastair Kirton stars as the title character of Colin, who discovers a zombie bite on his arm within the first few minutes of the film. Following his death and reanimation, he serves as our apocalyptic tour guide, mindlessly stumbling through the wreckage of suburbia longing to satisfy his new appetite.

Colin features top-notch acting and surprisingly good special effects for one, but its most impactful moment comes when Colin comes across his own family, horrified to discover their loved one, who can’t even recognize them, is now their greatest danger. It is a thought-provoking reminder these monsters steal not just human lives, but also humanity, and sees the traditionally feared undead earn our unexpected sympathies.

Bill Pullman swears he's not a zombie

3. The Serpent and the Rainbow (1988)

Today, the term “zombie” is often associated with rotting corpses seeking fresh, live meat, thanks to George Romero, but if you look back to the first inception of the concept, it gets a little weirder.

Directed by Wes Craven, The Serpent and the Rainbow focuses on the concept of black magic, which anthropologist Dennis Alan (Bill Pullman) travels to Haiti to investigate following reports of a drug resurrecting people from the dead. His findings bring him closer to the truth than he wanted, as, not just his life, but his soul soon becomes threatened.

The film is a return to the origin of zombies, defined as corpses reanimated by the use of witchcraft as a tradition of Haitian folklore. While still regarded as a supernatural thriller by execution, considering its nightmarish themes and historical significance, it sure makes you want to steer clear of voodoo.

This blue-faced flesh-eater saw a sad ending

2. George A. Romero’s Dead Series (1968-2009)

For the definitive depiction of a soulless, subhuman flesh-eater that we have come to know, love, and fear, we have the late George A. Romero to thank.

After first introducing us to the modern incarnation of the zombie in 1968’s revolutionary Night of the Living Dead, Romero kept bringing us back to his nightmarish vision of survival and carnage throughout the decades with more iconic films like Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, and Land of the Dead, imposing a new concept of potent social commentary with each.

He even took advantage of the found footage trend with Diary of the Dead in 2007 and a more sympathetic approach to his monstrous creations with Survival of the Dead two years later.

Despite inspiring many films to come forward later, what keeps Romero’s Dead series standing out among the rest is how their highly plausible depiction of the aftermath of chaos and how they serve as a reflection of human nature, commenting on topics like race, modern consumerism, and war.

But, if we’re talking about realism here, even Romero can’t beat this modern classic.

What a bummer for Cillian Murphy to wake up from a coma to

1. 28 Days Later… (2002)

The debate over whether or not it is accurate to call director Danny Boyle and writer Alex Garland’s chaotic tour de force a “zombie” movie is a little pointless to me.

Sure, the plot revolves around agile maniacs infected by biological rage as opposed to slow-moving dead people, yet that is precisely what makes it the most realistic “zombie” movie of all time.

The story picks up speed after Jim (Cillian Murphy) wakes up from a coma four weeks after a virus that is non-fatal, but turns most of London into senseless, adrenaline-fueled predators, breaks out. Not even simply avoiding a bite can save you as Brendan Gleeson’s fate shows that a single drop of blood entering your eye is enough to awaken the rage.

28 Days Later… makes the concept of society crumbling in the wake of disease scarier than the stories that inspired it because it forces you to believe it could happen.

What do you think of our realistic zombies movies ranking? Still not convinced, or are you prepping to zombie-proof your house now? However you feel about zombie movies, hopefully you can survive long enough to check back for movie updates and more here on CinemaBlend.

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Elle Winter Just Can’t Seem To Pull Away On Fizzy, Highly Danceable ‘Sick Of You’

Rising young pop singer Elle Winter is at the center of a sensory overload on “Sick of You,” her latest single and a confectionary slice of funky liberation. She might sing “When the night is over, we keep wanting more / I found myself running back to your door,” but from the sound of the production behind her, she’s actually having the time of her life.

“Sick of You,” as Winter explained in a statement, “describes being with a person who understands you and that you connect with.” That fizz is captured here over limber production work from The Orphanage, the behind-the-board duo of Trevor Brown and Zaire Koalo, whose soundtrack here recalls the ’80s work of Quincy Jones.

The duo provide right kind of foundation over which Winter can deliver the sweet, simple message implied by the title: “I can’t get sick of you.”

Winter began her career in movies with an assist from Disney, appearing in 2015’s 3 Generations and last year’s The After Party, led by rapper Kyle. While her first EP is still a few months away (it’s due out this fall), “Sick of You” is the second track we’ve heard from her this year after the Cherry Beach-assisted, EDM-tinged “Easy.”

And as she revealed on social media, “Sick of You” has the distinction of being released on her birthday.

Winter’s sound is in good hands: her producers also recently worked on Lizzo’s “Better in Color” and the towering 5 Seconds of Summer/Chainsmokers collab “Who Do You Love.”

Listen to “Sick of You” above. It can be your own personal birthday gift to Winter.

Olivia Wilde ‘Stole’ An On-Set Rule From Martin Scorsese In The Making Of Booksmart

When taking on an intimidating new endeavor, it’s always helpful to take inspiration from those who are the best at what they do. After all, their methodology clearly results in success, and mirroring that methodology theoretically should result in mirrored success. This is something that is regularly seen in the movie world when filmmakers are preparing to make their first feature, and it’s a tradition that Olivia Wilde continued in the making of her directorial debut, the upcoming comedy Booksmart.

Specifically, she took a page out of the playbook of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time: Martin Scorsese. The two had the opportunity to collaborate in recent years working on the HBO series Vinyl (which Scorsese co-created and Wilde starred in), and that experience proved to be motivating for the actress-cum-director in the making of Booksmart. Speaking during a Los Angeles press event earlier this week, Wilde revealed that she borrowed an on-set tactic from the Oscar-winner, which was that all scripts and sides were not made available to the stars during production. Said Wilde,

A script can often function as a safety net for actors, as they can look back on the material to remember specific lines, or it can help them find the proper emotion for a given moment in a larger story – but Olivia Wilde apparently wasn’t interested in letting her stars have that backup system. Instead, she felt it was more important for the cast to exist in the moment while cameras were rolling, and while it almost certainly led to deviations from what had been written, she felt that the freedom the environment provided was ultimately more important.

What makes this particular situation a little extra special, though, is that while Booksmart does feature some veteran adult stars – including Lisa Kudrow, Will Forte, and Jason Sudeikis – most of the ensemble is made up of younger actors (some of whom are making their feature film debuts). This in mind, you’d think that Olivia Wilde’s borrowed approach from Martin Scorsese might be seriously intimidating, but evidently that wasn’t the case.

Instead, as Wilde explained, they apparently weren’t flustered by that aspect of the experience at all – which came as a bit surprise to the first-time director:

Based on a script by Emily Halpern, Sarah Haskins, Susanna Fogel, and Katie Silberman, Booksmart centers on a pair of intelligent high school seniors (Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein) who start to feel a level of regret about their lack of high school partying when they realize that many of their more fun-oriented classmates still managed to get into good schools. They make the decision to subvert their reputations by attending an end-of-the-year blowout and letting loose for the first time in their lives – and it winds up leading to a fun adventure involving all kinds of strange roadblocks and weirdness along the way.

The film debuted earlier this year at the SXSW Film Festival, earning great reviews and heaps of buzz, and it won’t be long until audiences nationwide have the chance to see it for themselves. Booksmart will be heading into wide release next Friday, May 24th, so be sure to check it out, and stay tuned here on CinemaBlend for more about the movie.

Male Bosses Are Ignoring Women Colleagues After #MeToo. This Is a Problem.

One of my first jobs out of college had me assisting a publisher who frequently shared sensitive company information with me as I drafted memos and reports, which meant we often had to close the door to his office. He’d dictate what he needed to, and we’d move on with our day. Occasionally we’d do it over lunch. I never once felt uncomfortable and I’m pretty sure he didn’t either. Because I was good at my job, the publisher eventually promoted me.

This was almost two decades ago and much has changed for women—and men—at work. The most pervasive shift, of course, has been spurred by the #MeToo movement, which not only has managed to hold power-abusing men accountable for their actions but has also changed the norms so many women have silently faced in workplaces that range from farming to fashion.

But with any movement—especially one that exists to empower women—there has been a backlash and one particular facet is the idea that #MeToo has scared some men away from interacting with junior-level female colleagues.

According to new research released today by LeanIn.Org and SurveyMonkey, 60 percent of male managers say they’re uncomfortable participating in common workplace activities with a woman—a 32 percent increase from research done last year on the topic. The data found that senior-level men are 12 times more likely to hesitate before having one-on-one meetings, nine times more likely to hesitate to travel with a junior woman for business, and six times more likely to hesitate to go to a work dinner with a junior woman. Thirty-six percent of men also say they’ve avoided mentoring or socializing with a female co-worker because they were nervous about how it might look.

The problem: Most managers are male and their fear is prohibiting women from proving themselves and moving up at work.

“I don’t know of anyone who’s been promoted who hasn’t had one-on-one conversations [with a superior]” LeanIn.org founder and Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg told me by phone. “Women need that one-on-one time to get the mentorship and sponsorship they need to succeed.”

Sandberg knows this well. “[Facebook CEO] Mark Zuckerberg and I spend an enormous amount of time together and we spend an enormous amount of time one-on-one,” she said. “That one-on-one time has been where he’s given me the feedback that helps me do my job, [has] told me what I need to do better, [and] I’ve been able to give him feedback. That is not happening in a group setting.”

Sandberg also said her first meeting of the week Monday morning and the last meeting of the week [on] Friday afternoon is with Zuckerberg and nobody else. “That is our partnership and without that, I don’t know where we’d be.”

As far as a solution goes, LeanIn.Org is encouraging men to do more to actively support women at work, from increasing amounts of informal one-on-one time to participating in more official initiatives like sponsorships and mentoring—something Sandberg thinks will benefit men just as much as women. “[It isn’t] just the right thing to do to mentor and sponsor women It’s actually a good thing to do for your career [as a man] because if you’re the most senior CEO or most junior person, if you can work better with half the population, you are going to outperform.”

Being more or less invisible to a male superior is better than being uncomfortable, right? In theory, sure, but considering the vast majority of managers and leaders are men across most fields, the fact that women aren’t getting the attention they need to succeed because men are afraid isn’t doing anyone any favors, “Ultimately, this is about closing the gender gap at work, from the entry-level all the way to the top,” said Rachel Thomas, president of LeanIn.Org, in a statement. “When companies employ more women, sexual harassment is less prevalent. And when women hold more leadership roles, company profits are higher and workplace policies are more generous. Supporting women makes companies stronger and safer. To get there, we need men to be part of the solution.”

Tyler, The Creator’s New Album Igor Has Some Rules To Follow For Your First Listen

Tyler, the Creator‘s new album, Igor, is finally out. That’s one part of the news. The second, equally important part, is that when you listen to it, you have to listen to it in a very particular manner; “No skips. Front to back. No distractions either,” he wrote in a special note on Twitter on the eve of the LP dropping. So take that into consideration today when you’re basking in the fifth studio album comprised of songs that he produced, wrote, and arranged himself (also revealed in the same note). Follow the instructions.

Igor is different from anything else that Tyler, the Creator has ever released. So this pink note in question lays out exactly what to expect when listening to it: don’t expect anything. “Igor. This is not Bastard. This is not Goblin. This is not Wolf. This is not Cherry Bomb. This is not Flower Boy. This is Igor,” the note reads.

The LP credits no features, but Playboi Carti sings on “Earfquake” and Kanye West‘s voice can be heard on “Puppet.” The 12-track album features the full versions of previously teased tracks, “Igor’s Theme,” “Whatsgood,” “A Boy is A Gun,” and “New Magic Wand.” On Twitter, he announced that the vinyl will be available in “a few weeks.”

Tyler gave an exciting Twitter countdown to the LP’s release last night; he was clearly as exhilarated as fans were. He tweeted at 50 minutes, then 40, 30, 20, and 10 before then posting one every minute until the clock struck 12. His last was “ONE MINUTE FUCK” before posting the link to the album. Now that the new Creator music has arrived, the two-year wait (not counting “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch“) since Flower Boy is finally over.

Check out Igor up above and remember, no expectations. 

The Funniest Game of Thrones Bloopers

I just spent the last two hours watching Game of Thrones bloopers, and my mood didn’t improve like I thought it would. In fact, it did the opposite: I’m now scared, uncomfortable, and uneasy. And let me tell you why.

Well, some backstory first: Bloopers are my comedy drug of choice. Watching actors break character—whether on Saturday Night Live or Friends or even shows I haven’t seen—never fails to crack me up. The bagpipes blooper from Friends season seven? My spleen! The “Debbie Downer” SNL sketch featuring Lindsay Lohan? Someone call a medic. Every time Jimmy Fallon makes an appearance on camera? I’m laughing just as much as he’s laughing.

But this didn’t happen with the bloopers from Game of Thrones. Instead, I watched every slip-up and cackle from this accomplished cast with shock and dismay. Why, you ask? Because Game of Thrones isn’t supposed to be funny. Normally I can watch bloopers from drama or horror movies with ease, but the amount of death and destruction happening on GoT—especially this season—makes enjoying the gaffes damn near impossible. Dany just set all of King’s Landing on fire and killed Jaime and Cersei. There’s no time for laughing. There’s no time for smiling. All watching Peter Dinklage mess up the word “benevolent” in the blooper, below, made me think was, “Why didn’t you stop Daenerys from becoming the Mad Queen?”

And Cersei making funny faces between takes in this blooper? It’s hard to chuckle when you think about that whole-ass ceiling collapsing on her in last week’s episode.

Jaime flubbing his lines about Arya here just reminds me of that horrifying image of her emerging from the King’s Landing rubble.

I can’t even enjoy this cute friendship moment between Maisie Williams and Sophie Williams without thinking about the theory that Arya is already dead.

The coffee cup blunder from season eight, episode four just makes me think of…the travesty that was season eight, episode four.

And Jaime’s hand mistake? How can I laugh when I know he died a violent death at the hands of the Mad Queen?

This is where I’m at, people: so traumatized by what’s happening on GoT that I can’t even laugh at a good blooper. Not only is this show wrecking my Mondays, it’s taking away one of the only pure joys I have left. Has winter left yet?

Christopher Rosa is the staff entertainment writer at Glamour. Follow him on Twitter @chrisrosa92.

Olivia Wilde ‘Stole’ A On-Set Rule From Martin Scorsese In The Making Of Booksmart

When taking on an intimidating new endeavor, it’s always helpful to take inspiration from those who are the best at what they do. After all, their methodology clearly results in success, and mirroring that methodology theoretically should result in mirrored success. This is something that is regularly seen in the movie world when filmmakers are preparing to make their first feature, and it’s a tradition that Olivia Wilde continued in the making of her directorial debut, the upcoming comedy Booksmart.

Specifically, she took a page out of the playbook of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time: Martin Scorsese. The two had the opportunity to collaborate in recent years working on the HBO series Vinyl (which Scorsese co-created and Wilde starred in), and that experience proved to be motivating for the actress-cum-director in the making of Booksmart. Speaking during a Los Angeles press event earlier this week, Wilde revealed that she borrowed an on-set tactic from the Oscar-winner, which was that all scripts and sides were not made available to the stars during production. Said Wilde,

A script can often function as a safety net for actors, as they can look back on the material to remember specific lines, or it can help them find the proper emotion for a given moment in a larger story – but Olivia Wilde apparently wasn’t interested in letting her stars have that backup system. Instead, she felt it was more important for the cast to exist in the moment while cameras were rolling, and while it almost certainly led to deviations from what had been written, she felt that the freedom the environment provided was ultimately more important.

What makes this particular situation a little extra special, though, is that while Booksmart does feature some veteran adult stars – including Lisa Kudrow, Will Forte, and Jason Sudeikis – most of the ensemble is made up of younger actors (some of whom are making their feature film debuts). This in mind, you’d think that Olivia Wilde’s borrowed approach from Martin Scorsese might be seriously intimidating, but evidently that wasn’t the case.

Instead, as Wilde explained, they apparently weren’t flustered by that aspect of the experience at all – which came as a bit surprise to the first-time director:

Based on a script by Emily Halpern, Sarah Haskins, Susanna Fogel, and Katie Silberman, Booksmart centers on a pair of intelligent high school seniors (Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein) who start to feel a level of regret about their lack of high school partying when they realize that many of their more fun-oriented classmates still managed to get into good schools. They make the decision to subvert their reputations by attending an end-of-the-year blowout and letting loose for the first time in their lives – and it winds up leading to a fun adventure involving all kinds of strange roadblocks and weirdness along the way.

The film debuted earlier this year at the SXSW Film Festival, earning great reviews and heaps of buzz, and it won’t be long until audiences nationwide have the chance to see it for themselves. Booksmart will be heading into wide release next Friday, May 24th, so be sure to check it out, and stay tuned here on CinemaBlend for more about the movie.

Halsey Is Bloody And Brawling In Her Tenacious ‘Nightmare’ Video

Welcome to Halsey‘s nightmare.

The “Without Me” hitmaker has kicked off what appears to be a new era with the release of the punky single “Nightmare” and its bloody, brawling, and fire-filled video. In it, Halsey’s angry but emboldened as she spits dauntless declarations like “I’m no sweet dream but I’m a hell of a night” and “No, I won’t smile but I’ll show you my teeth.” That’s exactly what she does in the clip, which co-stars Cara Delevingne, Suki Waterhouse, and a cluster of uniformed schoolchildren as members of her badass girl gang.

This one’s more in line with Halsey’s hard-hitting Yungblud and Travis Barker collab “11 Minutes” than, say, “Bad At Love,” and it’s a thrilling taste of what her third album could sound like.

“Nightmare” arrived on Thursday night (May 16), just a week after she announced the single during an intimate show in New York City. A couple weeks prior, the 24-year-old wiped her Instagram feed — the universal sign that a pop star is about to begin a new era — and subsequently teased the song with fan-friendly lyric scavenger hunts and more IG posts.

It’s unclear if “Nightmare” will be another standalone single like “Without Me” or if it’ll proceed a new project, but all signs point to the latter. If so, it may be her biggest album to date — it’s been two years since her last LP, 2017’s Hopeless Fountain Kingdom, and since then, she’s only seen her star power rise, thanks to her first No. 1 single, “Without Me,” and her Top 10 hit with BTS, “Boy With Luv.” In short, it’s been anything but a nightmare.

Robert Pattinson Has Been Cast To Play The New Batman

Ever since Ben Affleck retired as Batman at the beginning of the year, fans have been wondering who would play the next version of the Caped Crusader in the DC Extended Universe. All that had been revealed was that it would be someone younger than Affleck and that The Batman director Matt Reeves was looking for someone well known. Well, evidently Twilight star Robert Pattinson was the best man for the job with those qualifications.

Weeks after he was among the rumored actors up for the Batman role, word has come in Robert Pattinson will don the cape and cowl next. This makes him the seventh actor to play Batman in a live action theatrical movie. According to Variety, Pattinson has been cast to lead The Batman even as Matt Reeves is still polishing the final draft of the script.