Kylie Jenner Put Milk in Her Cereal for the First Time Ever and Immediately Got Roasted on Twitter

In her 21 years on this earth, Kylie Jenner has starred on a reality TV show, started a nearly billion-dollar company, and welcomed a daughter. Until this week, however, one major thing she hadn’t done was put milk in a bowl of cereal. If you’re shocked, flabbergasted, and/or appalled, you’re not alone: Twitter users shared all those reactions and more after Jenner announced on Tuesday (September 18) evening that she’d tried the iconic duo for the first time ever the previous night.

The saga began with a simple tweet. “Last night i had cereal with milk for the first time. life changing,” she wrote, then explained in a quick follow-up, “i always liked cereal dry i never bothered to put milk.” The Twitterverse was instantly stunned but, of course, quickly gathered its thoughts and began bombarding Jenner with questions. Type of cereal? “Cinnamon Toast Crunch. amazing,” she replied. Type of milk? “Regular,” Jenner answered. Order in which she poured the ingredients in her bowl? “Cereal first.” All correct answers; Jenner may be new to the wild world of milky cereal, but at least she got it absolutely perfect the first time around.

In the end, while Jenner revealed that she hasn’t given up on her beloved bone-dry cereal, she did admit “milk was cool.” And there you have it.

Besides all those probing questions, Twitter users also sent Jenner suggestions for the next basic food combos she should try, with Seth Rogen even jumping in to recommend a PB&J. Groundbreaking! Others pointed out that although Jenner previously pronounced 2016 the “year of, like, realizing stuff,” she seems to have upheld that old New Year’s resolution for three years running. Others were so baffled by Jenner’s admission that they searched for something, anything, to make sense of it, with a few landing on a complex conspiracy theory that connects older sister Kim Kardashian West‘s recent discovery of hit 2014 podcast Serial with Jenner’s recent breakfast discovery. Spooky stuff.

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Busy Philipps Knows You Think She’s Extra

I’ve always been extra, but people haven’t always been kind about my extra-ness. A former male friend once said to me, “You know, people would consider you beautiful if you didn’t talk so much.” And an ex-boyfriend told me, “You laugh too loudly in restaurants, and you always need people to look at you.” I sort of understood what they were saying. I’m a lot. But ever since I was a kid, I’ve thought, Some people will like it, and some people will hate it. Either way, awesome.

Yet, growing up and working in Hollywood, I started to question whether I should try to be something else. Especially at 19, when I was told by producers, studios, and directors that I wasn’t OK the way I was. Like the time I landed a TV role and the makeup artist was instructed to cover up the moles on my face, neck, and body. I was like, Wait a minute, my moles are my skin. How is my skin not good enough for you?

Being told these things hurt, but I said to myself, You’re really talented and you’re really funny. So when social media hit, I loved it, because I felt like I finally had the ability to present my personality to people.

It never even occurred to me to manufacture myself. I was just me.

Once my Instagram Stories started getting really popular, The New Yorker called and wanted to do a piece on me. I was skeptical at first, like, “Are you trolling me?” But the writer said, “Every social platform has an early adopter, and you’re it for Instagram Stories.” I was like, How cool! The attention also came at a time when I was trying to figure out what to do careerwise. A pilot I’d done for NBC didn’t get picked up, and I was devastated—so much so that when Tina Fey’s company reached out about a project, I was like, “Guys. I’ve been doing this for 20 years. I don’t know if I can put myself through this again,” and passed.

PHOTO: Scan By The Icon

A New Take on Talk“What audiences are responding to on late-night is a personal take on the news,” says Busy Tonight host Busy Philipps. “I can bring that.”Preen By Thornton Bregazzi blouse, skirt. Wolford bodysuit, $150

Then, a week after that New Yorker story came out, I was in the desert for my manager’s fiftieth birthday. I was kind of stoned, and I turned to my husband, Marc, and said, “I know what I have to do. I have to have a late-night talk show.” So I called back Tina Fey’s producing partner, Eric Gurian, and in a crazy twist of events, they came back two weeks later, saying, “E! is looking for a late-night talk show.” When we made that deal, I thought: I willed it to be so.

What audiences are responding to on late-night is a personal take on the news. Working on Busy Tonight is exciting and scary, but I think it’s OK to be scared every once in a while. People want more authenticity; I can bring that. And I still love Instagram. I use it to develop ideas for the show, ask questions, and see what people are responding to.Getting here has been a journey. Sometimes I get asked, “How do you and Michelle Williams maintain such a close friendship when you’re both actors?” It’s because I’m not Michelle. She and I have two wholly different paths. Everybody’s career, and everybody’s success, is different. I stayed self-assured in who I was, and now this is my path. And yeah, it’s pretty fucking cool.

Read on for more outtakes from Glamour assistant editor Samantha Leach’s interview with Philipps:

GLAMOUR: You have such a rabid fan base on Instagram. Has there even a DM, or even a comment you’ve received, that’s made you think, wow, I’ve really touched someone’s life?

BUSY PHILIPPS: Once, a couple years ago, I was complaining about one of my daughters, and this woman responded very angrily at me like, ‘Go fuck yourself, like, at least you can have a child.’ I was like OK, do I respond? But before I could, someone else who follows me responded to her and said, ‘It sounds like you’re having a really hard time in your life. I am sending you love, and I hope everything works out for you.’ And then the [original] woman responded saying, ‘I just found out yesterday my 7th round of IVF failed. This is just a dark moment and I felt like lashing out.’ And the [other] woman responded saying, ‘I totally get it. That must be so hard. Just know that there are people who want to support you online. Sending you a virtual hug.’ It was such a sweet exchange. Sometimes trolls are just trolls. But in that specific instance, it was just so clear this woman was in pain.

PHOTO: Scan By The Icon

Naked AmbitionPhilipps’ tattoo reads, “Aced out in her nudes,” a nod to a childhood act of defiance she details in her memoir, This Will Only Hurt a Little, out this month. “I was a unique little kid,” she says.

GLAMOUR: You’re known for being so “unfiltered.” How will that translate into late night?

BP: What I’m hoping to build is [a show] for what we see as an underserved audience. People who care about [the news], but also like face masks, and want to know which celebrities were roommates when they first moved to L.A. Like, people don’t know that I only know Jessica Chastain because she and Michelle [Williams] have known each other forever. They did the Williamstown Theater Festival together. Or that Seth Meyers was Ike Barinholtz’s roommate. I think that kind of stuff is interesting. I just have a lot of information like that, because I’ve been working in Hollywood for 20 years. I know a lot of people’s dirt in a fun way. Fun dirt.

GLAMOUR: Since you’ve bared so much of your life online, do you ever get worried people won’t take you seriously on TV?

BP: No! I think people like vulnerability and personal takes. I’m not worried about it. I’m the fucking best. Why wouldn’t they take me seriously?

Busy Tonight premieres on October 28 on E!

Read This Before Asking Why Christine Blasey Ford Waited to Tell Her Brett Kavanaugh Story

On Monday, the #MeToo movement will get its highest wattage moment yet when psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford and Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testify in front of Congress about one night in Maryland over 36 years ago.

Ford’s lawyer calls what happened an “attempted rape,” involving Kavanaugh shutting her in a bedroom, pinning her down while pawing at her bathing suit, and clapping a hand over her mouth when she screamed; Kavanaugh says he “categorically and unequivocally” never did anything of this sort to Ford or anyone else.

Monday’s hearing is being touted by lawmakers as a chance to find out the truth. But it’s also going to be, in many ways, a public trial for the woman who accused Kavanaugh. With rape culture and victim shaming working overtime, as it so often does in our society, a familiar question will be on the table: Why did she wait so long to come forward?

Conservatives are already teeing up the argument that jumping on a girl and pawing at her is the type of every day occurrence that shouldn’t make headlines. “Sorry, but having a drunk 17 year old BOY grope you at a teenage party is not newsworthy!” one Twitter user posted this week. And by the standards of 1982, when the alleged incident occurred, they’re right. And that adds context when considering Ford’s decision to keep the experience to herself. Back then, the phrase “date rape” was newly minted in the lexicon and not widely used. (In 1975, Susan Brownmiller referenced the term for the first time, describing it as an aggressor pressing “his advantage to the point where pleasantness quickly turns to unpleasantness and more than the woman bargained for.”) Boys did whatever they wanted to girls. And girls mostly accepted this as the natural order of the species. “Boys will be boys,” explained a lawyer for three high school football players in Glen Ridge, N.J. who sexually assaulted a mentally disabled 17-year-old girl with a baseball bat and a broom handle in 1993.

Back then, as I chronicled in my book Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus, Americans didn’t consider anything that wasn’t a violent assault by a stranger to be rape. Even intellectuals in the 1980s and 1990s didn’t take sexual assault all that seriously—they treated it more as a philosophical koan of sex relations than an important social issue. In David Mamet’s Oleanna, a play about a feminist college student who accuses her professor of rape, he calls her “frightened, repressed, confused . . . abandoned young thing of some doubtful sexuality who wants power and revenge.” Controversial academic Camille Paglia, extremely popular in those decades, argued that masculine sexual aggression was normal, and a woman’s only choice was to protect herself; to say otherwise, she declared later, was to join a brigade of “fanatical sex phobes.”

In our era of #MeToo reckoning, these voices have become quieter and things have finally started to change. But things haven’t changed enough for one woman’s word to be believed simply on its own without corroborating evidence. Or without the argument that her experience has timed-out—that statue of limitations exist when it comes to trauma.

If history is any indication (or Justice Clarence Thomas’ defense when accused of sexual harassment during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1991) Kavanaugh is going to use the usual playbook to defend himself: calling himself a standup fellow—or, as Kellyanne Conway said, “a man of character and integrity”—and explaining he’s shocked, simply shocked, by this character assassination. He’ll talk about being raised right by his parents and point out that he’s a “carpool dad” for his two daughters, hoping that their mere existence will act as a shield against accusations against a member of their sex. But most importantly, he’ll talk about whether Ford told anyone at the time what happened that night.

No one who understands the nature of trauma and sexual assault thinks that it’s a big deal when women don’t tell an authority for months or years about an assault. Not every woman wants to upend her life in the pursuit of justice, or even deal with criticism about “playing the victim” from their peers or institutions. Couple that with an era where women, if something bad happened with a guy, would likely keep it to themselves due to the blasé attitude surrounding sexual violence and the permission boys and men had to engage in it. A cool Gen-X girl brushed off anything untoward, knowing there was no percentage in calling a boy out because even if a few of her friends believed her, the rest of the school would not. And how could they? In the 1980s, there were no tools and very little language to identify or corroborate assault.

As a friend who went to high school in the 1980s posted on Facebook this week, what might have happened to Ford “happened all the time when I was growing up and no doubt still does.”

“This is such a common story,” she wrote. “This happened ALL THE TIME. What also happened all the time was that women who this happened to didn’t really talk about it much because, see above.” Whether Kavanaugh is confirmed to the Supreme Court or sent off to play endless rounds of golf, one thing we know is that women aren’t being quiet about this any longer. But in addressing sexual misconduct, we must also grapple with our past and understand that the experiences of women of a certain age group cannot be examined without historical context. We cannot dismiss claims with the lazy excuse that “that’s how it was then.”

In fact, in cases like Ford’s, there’s no excuse to resort to old victim-shaming tropes. We have the tools, now. We must use them.


Vanessa Grigoriadis is the author of Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus, out October 2018, and a contributing writer at The New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair.

Milo Ventimiglia and Chrissy Metz’s *This Is Us* Audition Tapes Are Here to Make You Bawl

Before This is Us has its season three premiere next week, NBC decided to show us how its mega-popular family drama first took shape. In a just-released clip, audiences get a glimpse into the fateful auditions that led to the casting of Milo Ventimiglia as Jack and Chrissy Metz as Kate. Courtesy of Entertainment Weekly, the video features Ventimiglia describing how he noticed the show’s mastermind, Dan Fogelman, in the back of the room “literally just smiling” after his audition. Ventimiglia also remembers thinking that the smile likely meant that he had done his job. He was right.

The clip also offers us a look at Metz’s audition for Kate. While Ventimiglia had a pretty established career when he auditioned for Jack, Metz was virtually unknown. But one look at her audition, and it’s easy to see why Fogelman decided to make her one of the show’s emotional anchors. In the clip, Metz walks fans through her state of mind as she endured what would ultimately become a life-changing audition—at just the right time. “When I booked This Is Us, I had 81 cents in my bank account,” she told Glamour in February. “I could cry right now just thinking about it.”

'This Is Us' Audition Scenes 1/Social

PHOTO: NBC

The audition clips will air as part of The Paley Center Salutes This Is Us, a one-hour special featuring interviews with Fogelman and its stars, including Metz, Ventimiglia, Mandy Moore, Sterling K. Brown, Susan Kelechi Watson, Justin Hartley, and Chris Sullivan.

And while This Is Us was shut out at Monday night’s Emmy Awards, it continues to be a ratings juggernaut. The hugely anticipated third season is set to premiere on Tuesday, September 25. But if you can’t wait that long, be sure to watch The Paley Center Salutes This Is Us, Tuesday on NBC.

Related: All Your ‘This Is Us’ Season 2 Finale Questions Answered

Anita Hill Has Some Advice for the Senate Judiciary Committee on How to Handle the Kavanaugh Hearings

There is, perhaps, no person in America better suited to weigh in on the current state of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination hearings than Anita Hill.

In 1991, the law professor found herself in a position similar to that of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford in that both had come forward to accuse a Supreme Court nominee of sexual misconduct. Hill testified about a pattern of sexual harassment during her time working with now-Justice Clarence Thomas, while Ford alleges that Kavanaugh drunkenly assaulted her during a party while they were in high school. (He has denied her allegations, just as Justice Thomas denied ever harassing Hill.)

Ford is reportedly considering testifying at the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings about the matter, pending an FBI investigation requested Tuesday by Ford’s lawyer to “ensure that the crucial facts and witnesses in this matter are assessed in a non-partisan manner.” Hill, having had some experience in this area, is offering some words of wisdom to the Senate Judiciary Committee to get it right this time around.

“Today, the public expects better from our government than we got in 1991, when our representatives performed in ways that gave employers permission to mishandle workplace harassment complaints throughout the following decades,” Hill writes in the New York Times. “That the Senate Judiciary Committee still lacks a protocol for vetting sexual harassment and assault claims that surface during a confirmation hearing suggests that the committee has learned little from the Thomas hearing, much less the more recent #MeToo movement.”

Here are some takeaways from Hill’s powerful op-ed:

Don’t mix messages.

Hill says that confronting sexual harassment and ensuring the integrity of the Supreme Court are not things that are at odds with each other. “Both are aimed at making sure that our judicial system operates with legitimacy,” she writes.

Neutrality is key.

Hill suggests that a neutral body with experience in the subject of sexual misconduct should lead an investigation into Ford’s claims so as not to be tainted by the rampant partisanship we see on almost every current political matter. And after that, senators must rely on the results and act as fact-finders when asking their own questions. “The investigators’ report should frame the hearing,” says Hill. “Not politics or myths about sexual assault.”

Slow down.

Rushing the hearings is a mistake, according to Hill. She says it sends the message that these types of allegations are not important. “Simply put, a week’s preparation is not enough time for meaningful inquiry into very serious charges,” she says.

Say her name.

“Finally, refer to Christine Blasey Ford by her name. She was once anonymous, but no longer is. Dr. Blasey is not simply ‘Judge Kavanaugh’s accuser.’ Dr. Blasey is a human being with a life of her own. She deserves the respect of being addressed and treated as a whole person.”

Hill also wisely points out that Kavanaugh has the benefit of organized support for his side while Christine Blasey Ford will be “outresourced” and that “imbalance may not seem fair.”

While it may be too late to heed all of Hill’s warnings, we can only hope that the process is not as problematic as it was for her in 1991. I remember watching the coverage of those hearings as an almost 16-year-old and taking away the unfortunate message that it was extremely hard to be believed as a woman, no matter how credible your claims.

In the media run-up to Monday’s hearing, it would seem that not a lot has changed. I hope I’m proven wrong.

You can read the rest of Hill’s op-ed, here.

Related Stories:

Read This Before Asking Why Christine Blasey Ford Waited to Tell Her Brett Kavanaugh Story

In the Age of #MeToo, Will Christine Blasey Ford’s Experience Be the Same as Anita Hill’s?

Emilia Clarke and Henry Golding Are Set to Star in Your Dream Christmas Rom-Com

Fans of both Emilia Clarke and Henry Golding just got a very early holiday present. The Game of Thrones star is teaming up with the Crazy Rich Asians breakout in the upcoming film Last Christmas, Variety reports.

Apart from the fact that it’s a love story set in London, the plot is being kept mostly under wraps. But with Bridesmaids director Paul Feig attached to direct, it’s safe to assume there will be plenty of laughs.

The pairing of Clarke and Golding makes perfect sense, considering where these two are in their respective careers. Clarke is set to bid adieu to Daenerys Targaryen when Game of Thrones‘ eighth and final season gets underway next year. Since winning our hearts as the Mother of Dragons, Clarke has become a household name with a major film career on the horizon. She’s already dabbled on the big screen in films Solo: A Star Wars Story and Me Before You.

As for Golding, he’s coming off the juggernaut success of Crazy Rich Asians, which spent three consecutive weeks atop the box office. Golding, who was a television host and model prior to being cast in Crazy Rich Asians, landed the part of Nick Young after winning a global casting call. He later appeared in Feig’s recent Blake Lively-starring thriller, A Simple Favor.

Now, Clarke and Golding will package all their talent, charisma, and promise in what should be a major hit whenever it’s released. Unfortunately, that day is still a ways away, with no release date for Last Christmas announced. Until then, you can get your fix by watching GoT reruns on loop, or going to see Crazy Rich Asians for the fourth, fifth, and sixth times, if you haven’t been doing that already.

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Every Show-Stopping Outfit Lady Gaga’s Worn While Promoting ‘A Star Is Born’

Like many others on the Internet, I can’t stop thinking about Lady Gaga and her new movie, A Star Is Born. When I wake up in the morning, my first thought is to check how it’s doing on Rotten Tomatoes. (It’s at 96 percent, BTW.) My second thought is to see what the last entry is in Gaga’s slay-worthy press tour wardrobe. “Oscar season” hasn’t even officially started. I’m not sure I’ll make it until February.

Mother Monster’s currently on a worldwide tour promoting A Star Is Born,, and her outfits—no surprise—have been stunning. The pale pink Valentino Haute Couture gown she wore in Venice, even as it started to rain on the red carpet; the veiled Armani Privé moment that made for a dramatic reveal in front of photographers in Toronto; the Jonathan Simkhai bodycon dress she wore to make an entrance riding on the side of a boat: Gaga is giving us old Hollywood glam with a dash of pop flair in every country. And the result? Hyperventilation. Tears. Spontaneous sweating. Gaga’s red carpet outfits will end my life, I know it. (Which is a shame, because I really wanted to see A Star Is Born.)

Don’t understand why I’m freaking out? Allow these lewks to do the talking.

We bring you the trends. You make them your own. Sign up for our daily newsletter to find the best fashion for YOU.

Every Showstopping Outfit Lady Gaga’s Worn While Promoting ‘A Star Is Born’

Like many others on the Internet, I can’t stop thinking about Lady Gaga and her new movie, A Star Is Born. When I wake up in the morning, my first thought is to check how it’s doing on Rotten Tomatoes. (It’s at 96 percent, BTW.) My second thought is to see what the last entry is in Gaga’s slay-worthy press tour wardrobe. “Oscar season” hasn’t even officially started. I’m not sure I’ll make it until February.

Mother Monster’s currently on a worldwide tour promoting A Star Is Born,, and her outfits—no surprise—have been stunning. The pale pink Valentino Haute Couture gown she wore in Venice, even as it started to rain on the red carpet; the veiled Armani Privé moment that made for a dramatic reveal in front of photographers in Toronto; the Jonathan Simkhai bodycon dress she wore to make an entrance riding on the side of a boat: Gaga is giving us old Hollywood glam with a dash of pop flair in every country. And the result? Hyperventilation. Tears. Spontaneous sweating. Gaga’s red carpet outfits will end my life, I know it. (Which is a shame, because I really wanted to see A Star Is Born.)

Don’t understand why I’m freaking out? Allow these lewks to do the talking.

We bring you the trends. You make them your own. Sign up for our daily newsletter to find the best fashion for YOU.

Amandla Stenberg: Stylists Have Made Me Feel Like My Natural Hair Is ‘Too Challenging’

Amandla Stenberg knows firsthand how the right haircut can change more than just your outward appearance. In a new essay for InStyle, Stenberg discusses how the actor’s relationship with hair has changed over the years. It turns out Stenberg’s recent decision to chop off hair for an upcoming movie was a game changer.

In the essay Amandla describes the recent decision to shorten, little by little, the afro that had become “a symbol of my self-acceptance” and a profession of “loving my blackness.” “As soon as I got tired of that [look] being my identity, I cut my hair shorter,” Stenberg writes. “I was curious how that might affect people’s perception of my gender too, so I kept cutting it shorter and shorter. I wanted a hairstyle that felt less feminine.” So when the director of upcoming film Where Hands Touch told Stenberg to chop off hair to play a biracial teen in Nazi Germany, it was sink-or-swim. “I wanted to truly connect with my character, and that meant understanding firsthand what it was like to live without hair,” the actor wrote.

The cut, however, ended up bringing enriching Amandla’s personally. “Shaving my head was wild. I felt a sense of complete neutrality. It was so freeing. This summer I came out as gay, and I must say, having no hair made me feel even more comfortable with my gender and sexuality,” Stenberg explained. “My hair is still short, but I let it grow out a bit to give myself more options. Sometimes it’ll be a more masculine look with little-boy curls, or I’ll part it in the middle and slick it down to look more feminine. The best part: It’s totally up to me.”

Amandla Stenberg 1

PHOTO: John Sciulli/Getty Images

Stenberg, who stars next in The Hate U Give, also writes about accepting natural hair. “As a kid I was endlessly frustrated by my hair,” Stenberg said. It didn’t help that the stylists on the set of The Hunger Games, one of Stenberg’s very first films, had no idea how to style natural hair. “They also openly expressed frustration about how it was too challenging. I wasn’t all that self-conscious, but I remember very clearly feeling that my hair wasn’t acceptable, that something was wrong with it,” the actor recalled.

Once again, it was a haircut that changed everything for Stenberg. “When I hit 16, though, I got my hair cut by someone who knew black hair and black curl patterns. That haircut changed the game for me. It brought out my curls in a beautiful way. I learned to appreciate my natural hair texture, and I realized that it was really special if I let it do its thing,” she wrote. Since then, Amandla has learned the power and significance of natural hair. “Black hair carries the weight of our ancestors and our tradition. Almost all black women grow up sitting with their moms, whether it’s once a day or once a week, having their hair combed through and then getting it twisted or braided or whatever it may be,” Stenberg wrote. “There’s something so beautiful about that act. It carries all the love, tenderness, strength, and uniqueness about where we’re from. It’s something most black women share, even if every person’s curl pattern is different.”

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Jonathan Van Ness Geeked Out Over All the Celebs at the Emmys, and I’ve Never Felt More Seen

Last night’s Emmys received a much-needed dose of electricity when Jonathan Van Ness, Tan France, Bobby Berk, Antoni Porowski, and Karamo Brown (a.k.a Queer Eye’s Fab Five) hit the stage to present the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series. No one was more excited to be there than Van Ness, though, who spent basically all of Emmys weekend geeking out over his favorite celebrities—so, in other words, doing exactly what you or I would do.

It all started at the Annual Netflix Emmy Nominee Toast on September 15 in Los Angeles. In between chatting up his Queer Eye co-stars, Van Ness found some time to kick it with Diane Keaton. Just look at his smile in the pic, below. He’s very aware he’s in the presence of royalty and no doubt asked Keaton, “Where the hell is your Oscar for Something’s Gotta Give?

Ted Sarandos' 2018 Annual Netflix Emmy Nominee Toast

PHOTO: Getty Images

Van Ness posted the same photo to his Instagram account and captioned it, “The defining moment of my life, like you guys. When I looked up and saw none other than Miss Diane Keaton, I clutched my pearls and gasped in a silently audible way from my heart chakra I’ve never heard. My fashion icon, my First Wives Club icon, my world. Omg.” Don’t tell me you wouldn’t post literally the same caption verbatim if you were in this situation. We all would. We all love First Wives Club.

At the same party, Van Ness also posed for a pic with Stranger Things star Millie Bobby Brown, writing on Instagram, “Eleven degrees of OMFG.” Relatable content.

The actual Emmys were just as exciting. Here, Van Ness is pictured laughing with Mandy Moore and (in my mind) thinking, “Please let me style your grandma Rebecca wig on This Is Us.”

NBC's "70th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards" - Red Carpet

PHOTO: Getty Images

It’s almost a given he’d pose for a group selfie with Will & Grace star Megan Mullally. Gay legends supporting gay legends!

IMDb LIVE After The Emmys 2018

PHOTO: Getty Images

Tina Fey would make a great addition to the Queer Eye squad, don’t you think? She could be tasked with making people funnier. (See her photo with the Fab Five, below.)

NBC's "70th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards" - Red Carpet

PHOTO: Getty Images

Van Ness later snapped a pic with The Crown star Claire Foy and called her “mom” on Instagram. Spoken like a true super-fan!

And he essentially wrote the same thing about his photo with Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke: “Found my dragon mum.” (Van Ness created a known parody series of GoT called Gay of Thrones).

I’ve never felt more seen! Thank you, Jonathan Van Ness, for letting me know it’s OK I haven’t stopped crying about A Star Is Born since the trailer dropped. Deep down, we’re all just a bunch of stans.

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