ADHD In Women Often Goes Untreated—Getting Diagnosed at 25 Changed Everything

The reason, at least in part, is one you’ve heard countless times before: gender bias.

Since boys are “socialized generally to be more physically active and rowdier than girls,” their ADHD symptoms are noticed more quickly, says says Sabrina Gratia, D.O., a psychiatrist specializing in children and adolescents. Girls with ADHD still struggle with the characteristic inattentiveness and constant distraction, but are typically less hyperactive—they often fly under the radar. “A female student who daydreams, doodles in her book and takes a longer time to complete her assignment does not raise as many flags as a student who is loud, throws, and runs out of the classroom,” Gratia explains.

The pressure placed on women to do well and not make trouble doesn’t help. Without an ADHD diagnosis girls can go years—even their whole lives—compensating for the condition rather than getting treatment. Just like I did.

There’s just one little problem with the “just work harder” strategy: there are consequences to ignoring your ADHD.

I learned this in a dozen different ways over the years. Because my hands always needed to be in action, I fidgeted constantly, with disturbing results: bitten nails, pulled eyebrows, torn-apart lips. I picked at every little blemish leaving acne scars in their wake. Because I struggled so much with being present, I even had difficulty focusing during sex, and often felt like I was missing out on a deeper, more in-tuned feeling. I grew angry that I couldn’t seem to rein in my behaviors, and that disappointment was compounded by shame. I felt like I wasn’t “normal,” lacking the self-control and peace that so many other people seemed to have.

That’s a dangerous way of thinking, says Gratia. Over time, those thoughts can lead to an even more challenging mix of depression and anxiety on top of the ADHD. Almost a decade after I’d decided to ignore my diagnosis, I found myself feeling worse than I ever had. I’d always felt on edge and antsy, but entering a relationship when I was 23—and having someone actually witness just how often I cracked my joints or compulsively picked at my face, and point it out to me with concern—finally made me see just how much my behaviors were spiraling out of control. So I spoke to a therapist, who attributed the tics to anxiety—not ADHD.

This is a common situation for women with ADHD, says Sanam Hafeez, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist. “Mental health professionals, physicians, and educators may not see or may attribute ADHD symptoms in girls and women to other conditions,” she says. They’re often overlapping conditions but anxiety is often the more obvious diagnosis for women. In my case, I had both anxiety and ADHD, but the latter condition never came up in conversation.

I started taking Zoloft for the anxiety; it helped but, it didn’t address my fidgeting or the feeling that I was constantly in overdrive. So I switched to Prozac, but instead of toning down my behaviors, it just made them worse. After a few scary weeks of cracking my knuckles every few seconds and picking my skin until it bled, I stopped the Prozac and moved to Cymbalta, eager for a change. Yet even though that medication was supposed to address OCD symptoms (aka my body-focused tics), that just made me feel lethargic and disconnected. So after awhile, I stopped that one, too.

I was frustrated. Would it really be so bad if I never found the right fit? After all, I thought, channeling my 16-year-old self, wasn’t I happy and successful, with a career in which people who could think fast and multi-task thrived? It would’ve been nice to slow down, yes, but I could manage. I always had.

I might’ve stayed like that—convincing myself that the abnormal was normal, making excuses for my behavior, finding even more ways to compensate—if I hadn’t mentioned, in an appointment with a new psychiatrist, that I’d once been diagnosed with ADHD. “Really?” he asked, immediately intrigued. “Well, that makes a lot of sense.”

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Had a Surprise Visit From the Queen at Their New Home

Meghan Markle is due to give birth any moment now, so it makes sense that members of the royal family are popping by her new home at Frogmore Cottage to see how she’s feeling. Earlier this week, it was Kate Middleton and Prince William who stopped by for a quick visit. Now, new reports say that the Queen had actually been over around Easter, too, and received a tour of the recently updated digs from Markle and Prince Harry.

According to sources who spoke to The Sun, the Queen was actually the very first visitor the Duke and Duchess of Sussex had over. She apparently had been nearby at Windsor Castle and took the short walk to Frogmore Cottage, which she gave to Markle and Prince Harry as a wedding gift. The cottage used to be a staff residence until renovations turned it into a five-bedroom home, where the royal couple has been enjoying lots of privacy before the baby comes.

“Her Majesty wanted to formally welcome the Sussexes to their new home so she was their first visitor,” a source said. “After all, they’ve practically moved into her back garden. She visited with other family members, and Harry and Meghan were delighted to show them round. The Queen was at Windsor Castle at Easter and wanted to see Meghan before she has the baby.”

There’s still no word on when exactly the baby will come, though there was some Internet excitement over the weekend when an ambulance was seen near the cottage. However, that seemed to be unrelated to the royal birth. Instead, Markle is said to be enjoying time with close friends and family. Frogmore Cottage reportedly has a guest annex where her mother, Doria Ragland, is staying. She arrived in the U.K. last week to support Markle and to meet her future grandchild. The gang is all here, so now all we need is the baby.

Ashley Benson and Cara Delevingne Shut Down a Troll Who Said Ashley Should Date Men

Ashley Benson and Cara Delevingne are reportedly in a relationship, and everyone I know is thrilled about it. But some trolls on the Internet feel differently. Just this week, a seemingly-homophobic Instagram user left a nasty message on Benson’s page urging her to date men instead of Delevingne.

“Ashley I know you are here,” the person wrote, according to BuzzFeed. “I’m serious, you need to stay away from that devil and never go back. I’m sure many strong, handsome, religious man [sic] would take you back in a heartbeat. You are not like this. You aren’t gay. You love men, and you need one.”

This comment is despicable on every level possible. We have absolutely zero time for homophobia in 2019, people—and Benson reminded this person as much in her response.

“You need to mind your own business,” she wrote back in a comment, per BuzzFeed. “Stop making things up.”

Delevingne’s response, though, was a bit more charged. “You are fucking disgusting,” she commented back. “If you have a problem with true love, then come and say this shit to my face instead [of] pathetically hating through Instagram. I genuinely feel sorry for you both, you are clearly not happy with your lives and have far too much time on your hands. Maybe get a hobby that doesn’t involve being homophobic and hating others for being happy.” BuzzFeed has all the screenshots of what went down.

Ashley Benson and Cara Delevingne first sparked dating rumors last year when they were spotted leaving a Lauryn Hill concert together. Neither has talked directly about their relationship, but they’ve been spotted kissing, and in September Benson attended Delevingne’s Balmain Paris fashion show. They both star in Elisabeth Moss’ new movie Her Smell, which centers on a beloved female rock star’s fall from grace.

Jon Snow’s Biggest Mistakes on *Game of Thrones*

On Game of Thrones, Jon Snow (played by Kit Harington) has a lot of things going for him: He’s honorable, he respects women (except when it comes to battle strategy), and he makes brooding look sexy like no one else can. But I think the former King in the North needs to get his act together, stat. Throughout the past eight seasons, we’ve seen him make the same mistakes over and over again. Frankly, I’m over his nonsense. If this week’s episode was any indication, I’m not the only one. From his terrible time management skills to his poor assassination attempts, here’s an abridged breakdown of all the times Jon Snow has made me shout “Are you serious?” at my TV.

First, Jon Snow is a horrible planner.

We’re talking about a man who went north of the wall in season seven to capture a white walker with six men and zero escape plan. Flash forward to the Battle of Winterfell and Jon seems to have learned nothing (cc: Ygritte) about the importance of strategy. Jon, I don’t think screaming in the face of an ice dragon is a sufficient form of defense. Did I miss that raven from the Citadel? I thought he was supposed to protect Bran—so was that 20-minute joy ride with Rhaegal really necessary? Caught up in the moment or not, watching this man risk the lives of those around him so he can take a reckless solo charge at the Night King one more time makes me want to rebuild the wall just to push him off the top. This is exactly how we lost Viserion, sir.

If there is a plan, he’ll mess it up.

The only thing Jon Snow loves more than not having a plan is throwing a perfectly good one away. This man can swing a sword admirably, but he has the time management and concentration skills of a chef trying to shop for ingredients on Cutthroat Kitchen. Remember the Battle of the Bastards at the end of season six? The one thing everyone could agree on was the fact that Ramsey Bolton and his men would have to charge first because the Starks didn’t have the numbers. Don’t get me wrong, Rickon’s death was tragic, but Jon Snow starting the charge early—and totally discounting Sansa’s warning—caused me physical pain. His inability to follow his own simple commands would have cost his bannermen their lives if Sansa hadn’t swooped in at the last moment to save his butt. You had one job, Jon. Get your head in the game.

His honor always gets in the way.

This is the only time in my life I’ll say this, but I wish this man would lie more. Did he learn nothing from Ned? I’m all for being honorable and good, but for the love of the old gods and the new someone should please give Jon a presentation on reading the room. In the season five finale, his failure to engage in politics (or address the concerns the men of the Night’s Watch have about letting the wildlings through the wall) quite literally gets him killed. Teaming up with the Wildlings was the right thing to do, but as the Lord Commander, he really needed to work on that delivery.

What’s more, after the Red Woman brings him back to life, Jon puts it in danger again during the final episode of season seven. Jon and the gang travel to King’s Landing (a.k.a the literal lion’s den) to negotiate a truce with Cersei so they can take a break to fight the white walkers. When Cersei agrees to help on the condition that Jon’s loyalty remains neutral, he tells her he’s already bent the knee to Dany. Jon, sweetie, it’s called timing. Look it up. I mean, why go through the trouble of lying? It’s not like the fate of humanity depends on it. As far as I can tell, Jon has only cast aside his honor when he needed to break his oath of celibacy. Which, get it.

He never learns from his mistakes.

Case in point: After being declared the true king in the north, Jon travels south (mistake number one), falls in love with Dany (his aunt), bends the freakin’ knee, and then decides to bring her to Winterfell. Worst. Surprise. Ever. Seriously, this is the only encounter I’ve seen that could rival the drama at my own personal Thanksgiving table. Jon’s failure to prepare his people and Dany for the culture shock demonstrates his own ignorance. He knew his northern people wouldn’t accept a southern queen, but he didn’t try to be a mediator at all, especially not between Dany, Sansa, and Arya. Who brings their new, slightly murderous significant other home to meet their family and doesn’t prepare for conflict? When you play the game of thrones you win or you die, and it sure seems like Jon Snow is hoping to accomplish the latter.

Pink Opens Up About Having a Miscarriage at 17 Years Old

Pink has always been quite transparent about her journey to motherhood, and in a new interview with USA Today she opens up about having a miscarriage at 17-years-old.

The pop star first acknowledged this experience in her new song “Happy” (from the recently-released album Hurts 2B Human). “Since I was 17, I’ve always hated my body, and it feels like my body’s hated me,” she sings at the top of the track. Those lyrics, it turns out, partially derive from her miscarriage.

“The reason I said [the lyrics] is because I’ve always had this very tomboy, very strong gymnast body, but actually at 17 I had a miscarriage,” Pink tells USA Today. “And I was going to have that child. But when that happens to a woman or a young girl, you feel like your body hates you and like your body is broken, and it’s not doing what it’s supposed to do.”

Pink says she’s had “several miscarriages” since: “I think it’s important to talk about what you’re ashamed of, who you really are and the painful [expletive]. I’ve always written that way.”

And she’s always talked in interviews that way. Just last week Pink revealed to Ellen DeGeneres she isn’t posting pictures of her children to social media anymore because of incessant mommy-shaming. The catalyst for this move was a round of negative comments she received for a photo of her son not wearing a diaper. (She eventually deleted the pic and replaced it with a message to trolls: “I’m turning off my comments and shaking my head at the state of social media and keyboard warriors,” she wrote. “There is something seriously wrong with a lot of you out there.”)

“I’m not posting pictures of them anymore,” Pink told DeGeneres. “And I understand people saying, ‘You should have been more careful because you’re in the public eye,’ and they’re right—but there’s a nice way to say that. There’s a kind way to be online. And I’m open to kindness.”

It Just Got a Whole Lot Easier to Shop Gigi Hadid’s Instagram

Instagram is a great source of inspiration—for style, beauty, home decor, what have you. But you’ve had to rely on workarounds to shop on the app: screen-grab the tags on a favorite influencer’s posts, leave comments asking where to find something, download tools like LiketoKnow.it. Over the years Instagram has rolled out features to make things easier (“swipe-ups” on Instagram Story let verified users link to specific products, “collections” let them save posts to revisit later). And in April the debut of “Checkout With Instagram” allowed users to purchase items from select partner brands (including Warby Parker, H&M, Kylie Cosmetics, and Nike) right there on the app.

That was only the beginning. Today Instagram announced that its “Checkout” feature will be available to select creators—i.e., influential Instagram users from a range of industries—to add products to their posts. In other words: When Checkout launches on May 9, you’ll be able to click on a photo from, say, Gigi Hadid, and buy what she’s wearing, without leaving Instagram.

There are some limits. In the initial rollout, 55 creators who will have access to this feature will be able to add products to their posts from only the 20 brands Checkout With Instagram launched with last month. Adidas, Burberry, Dior, Michael Kors, Outdoor Voices are all on there, among other fashion brands, as are beauty brands like Anastasia Beverly Hills, ColourPop, Kylie Cosmetics, and KKW.

“From the earliest days of Instagram, the community has been at the heart of everything we do—we build products inspired by and for our global community of one-plus billion,” says Eva Chen, Instagram’s head of fashion. “Over 130 million users tap on a shopping post every month, so the demand is definitely there.” She says she bought an Outdoor Voices set when Checkout With Instagram first went live. “Anecdotally, I’ve had so many friends DM me and tell me, ‘OMG, this is the best thing ever!’ or ‘RIP my wallet lol,'” she says of Checkout With Instagram. “We know that this is something the community has asked for—right now we’re in testing phase, but you can imagine that we’ll continue to bring more brands on board as we evolve the test.”

Come May, you’ll be able to shop Hadid’s feed, as well as that of Aimee Song, Blair Eadie, Camila Coelho, Chriselle Lim, Chiara Ferragni, Jen Atkin, Katie Sturino, Negin Mirsalehi, and some of the Kardashian-Jenners. Chen says Instagram didn’t select the influencers; instead the platform let each company nominate users they wanted to promote and sell their products through this new feature. Still, they wanted a mix of backgrounds represented: “Instagram is a global community of one billion—no one size fits all,” says Chen. “It was important that we had a diverse representation included in the test so we could really see how the community responds.”

Katie Sturino sees the new feature as a major timesaver, and something her followers have been asking for. “I think shopping is one of the most interesting parts of Instagram for a lot of my followers. They want to know every detail of what I’m wearing,” she says. Checkout will save her a lot of the back-and-forth in the comments section—and no doubt maximize her relationships with the brands in the program.

Already, Checkout With Instagram has been billed as a huge business opportunity. Deutsche Bank published a report predicting it could make $10 billion in revenue in 2021. In other words, when you have a model with 47.4 million followers, plus a handful of style bloggers with equally impressive followings, there will be a lot of merchandise moving.

Game of Thrones-Inspired Baby Names Are on the Rise

If you start meeting a lot of kiddos named Arya or Khaleesi soon, don’t be surprised—the New York Times reports that Game of Thrones-inspired names are steadily on the rise.

The show seems to be all that anyone can talk about lately, especially as it approaches the final episode in a nail-biter of a season. But for some diehards, that fandom is so intense they’re naming their offspring after their Westeros favorites. According to data from the Social Security Administration that The Times looked at, Khaleesi was the 630th most popular girl’s name in 2017. That same year more than 2,156 babies named Arya were born.

And those aren’t the only characters getting tributes. In 2017, there were 20 Sansas, 11 Cerseis, 55 Tyrions, and 23 Theons born in the U.S. The name Daenerys enjoyed some newfound popularity, too, though it’s not quite as big a hit as Khaleesi. Game of Thrones pet names are getting popular, too: The Times found a dog called Jorah Mormutt and a few cats named Lady and Drogo.

The article also highlights one couple who had a totally different approach to a Game of Thrones-inspired baby name. Rather than go with a character, they got crafty and named their daughter “Winter” after the show’s popular “Winter is coming” catchphrase.

We’ve known that baby names often reflect what’s percolating in pop culture, so we’re not totally shocked by this trend. Back in 2014, Disney and Frozen seemed to be behind a huge rise in the number of Elsas coming into the world. Now it seems Arya is going to continue to be the new cool kid name. As one parent said in The Times piece, “Some people think I took my obsession with the show too far. I don’t really care. Arya knows who she is and that’s who she wants to be. She goes and gets it. Nothing stops her—not even that she’s a small girl.”

After that insanely heroic moment with Arya in the last episode, we’re inclined to agree—and we have a feeling more people are going to want to pass on that bad-assery on to their kids.

Chrissy Teigen on Diapers, Mommy Shamers, and Luna’s New Big Girl Bed

Chrissy Teigen loves to change diapers. Really! She does. In fact, she’ll choose diaper duty over just about all other parental responsibilities. She’d rather change diapers than, for example, watch Coco for the millionth time or do the Beast voice from Beauty and the Beast—a party trick her three-year-old daughter Luna likes to demand, pushing her mother to scream, “You cannot go to the ball,” which in turn “makes me feel so weird,” Teigen—who with her husband John Legend and their children, Luna and Miles, form the most viral famous nuclear unit whose last name doesn’t begin with a “K”—tells Glamour.

When I attempt to call her bluff—who could like diapers that much?—Teigen remains firm: “Poop, pee, it never bothered me or John. That probably comes from having so many bulldogs together. It didn’t phase us at all. People were like, ‘Oh my god you have to get the Peepee Teepee, so Miles doesn’t pee on you.’ Maybe he’s just a super thoughtful baby, but he’s never done that to me.”

Teigen is a multi-hyphenate. She’s a New York Times bestselling cookbook author, host, unofficial high priestess of Twitter, Glamour 2018 Woman of the Year, mother to Luna and Miles, wife to Legend—and now, diaper designer. Teigen has teamed up with Pampers as the first-ever creative consultant for the new Pampers Pure Collection. The “Chrissy Pack” is exclusively available at Target—and the diapers are decked out with bulldogs (because, duh) and pretzels (a nod to her love of savory snacks).

And for the 35 million of us who follow Teigen on social media, we know her love of diapers is just one more realm in which she’s embraced the less glamorous aspects of modern parenthood. Teigen’s approach to motherhood—and frank portrayal of it on Instagram—is perfectly imperfect. In between beautifully lit shots of Luna, come photos of her breastfeeding both Miles and Luna’s babydoll—at the same time. For scores of her followers, her candor is the root of her appeal, but it can also rile up critics, the infamous bands of internet mom shamers who somehow have all the time in the world to criticize her. “I think it’s a natural reaction to tell people how they can be better, especially parents,” Teigen says. But, she adds, “it’s important for people to realize everyone is going through a different struggle. Every child is different, every parenting style is different. Like, people get worried all the time that my kids are on the countertop [in my kitchen]. And I’m like that’s just how we cook—I like them to be right in the mix of everything. I want their hands in there. I’m sitting on the counter, too. They’re never in danger. I’m right there.” In a lesson we could all stand to internalize, she points that the detractors are “not living in this house, so they don’t really know.”

Legend and Teigen never planned on sharing so much of their children’s lives online. “We didn’t think we’d be those kind of parents who were showing them off all the time,” says Teigen. “But it became such a normal part of our life. I was never the kind of person who loved posting selfies, or glam photos. I love taking pictures of other people and posting them. I’m with my kids more than anyone else so it just kind of happens.” But when Teigen first started flooding her feed with candid parenting shots, the negative comments from the over-concerned moms did affect her. “When I was in sensitive times with Luna, I would sometimes take things a different way. I’ve noticed that I’m really sensitive if I read Twitter first thing in the morning, so I let myself breathe for a little bit. Then the same comment won’t affect me the same way in the afternoon. You just stop becoming sensitive it to it all really,” she says.

Teigen has learned to tune out most of the noise. Instead, she’s put her mental energy toward savoring every last moment of the little-kid time she has left with Luna—who’s now a defiant toddler and for the most part, out of diapers. “She’s in her big girl bed now. It came early for us. One day she was like, ‘I want a big kid bed. I want to be big.’ So we got her a little staircase to climb up to it. But there’s still nothing like the times when she wants mama. Like this morning, she was choking crying, because we were trying to get her to apologize to Miles for throwing a toy at him. She couldn’t control her crying. Just those moments of being able to soothe her and being the one she goes to when she needs that crying to stop; I like when their heads just fall into your neck and they just cuddle you forever. I’m very touchy-feely, and Luna really isn’t, so when she does it I love it.”

A Fashion Editor Called Supermodel Helena Christensen’s Outfit ‘Tacky’—and People Aren’t Having It

Helena Christensen is one of the OG supermodels—and, in the minds of many (myself included), one of the most stylish women on the planet.

So it was quite shocking to learn that Alexandra Shulman, the former editor-in-chief of British Vogue, called out Christensen for wearing what Shulman dubbed a “tacky” outfit.

The look in question was from Gigi Hadid‘s denim-themed 24th birthday party. Christensen wore a lacy black bustier top with high-waisted jeans. Schulman, however, apparently wasn’t a fan.

“There comes that point in every woman’s life when, however reluctantly, you have to hand over the fleshpot-at-the-party baton to the next generation,” she wrote in her Daily Mail column. She goes on to say that Christensen is typically very stylish, before asking: “So why last week, at the age of 50, did she decide to pitch up at Gigi Hadid’s 24th birthday party in a tacky, black lace bustier?”

The rest of the column is pretty ageist, as Shulman argues that a 50-year-old woman shouldn’t be dressing in such a manner.

“There isn’t a guidebook on how brazenly women can dress as the years pass. And neither should there be. Prescriptive rules and formulaic dressing for your age are dull,” Shulman continued, seemingly contracting herself before adding: “We might like to think that 70 is the new 40 and 50 the new 30 but our clothes know the true story. No matter how pert your breasts, how great your legs, how invisible your bingo wings, our clothes simply don’t look the same as we age because they are about the person wearing them, not the items themselves. They are about the people—not just the bodies—that we have become.”

“Something you wore at 30 will never look the same on you 20 years later. Clothes don’t lie,” she added. “When women’s bodies no longer serve any child-bearing purpose, we find flaunting them disturbing and slightly tragic. I don’t claim that this is fair. But it’s true. This doesn’t mean older women should give up and go into purdah. There’s nothing wrong in wishing to be desirable—it’s just not best achieved wearing a black lace corset in public.”

Yeah, I’m going to have to take a hard pass on that mentality. Personally, I think Christensen looks great—but it doesn’t really matter what my opinion of her look is. Every woman, regardless of her age, should be welcome to dress however she chooses and not have to feel the weight of societal biases in the process. To have another woman in the industry question her choices in this way is a real bummer.

I’m not alone in feeling this way, as a number of people posted online in support of Christensen. The supermodel herself fired back with a hilariously on-point Instagram post.”Let’s continue to elevate and support each other, all you beautiful, smart, fun, sexy, hard working, talented, nurturing women out there ❤️? #ooopssheworeabustieragain ??@camillastaerk @talilennox,” she captioned an image of herself wearing yet another bustier.

Fellow super Linda Evangelista responded in the comments, “She should be ashamed of herself. You are a goddess ??.” Naomi Campbell shared her thoughts, too, writing: “She has no right or claims to be writing such a ridiculous article. I’ve known you 30 years and whatever you wear, you wear it well with class and dignity!!”

Actress Julianne Moore added, “U always do, my beautiful friend. ❤️❤️❤️” Current editor-in-chief of British Vogue Edward Enninful chimed in with, “You are BEAUTIFUL inside and out.”

There’s most certainly a way to critique outfit choices that doesn’t employ tired, ageist ideas about what how a woman is supposed to dress. I would have hoped a professional fashion editor would have applied more thoughtfulness to her approach. Still, I’m glad that it’s spawned a conversation—and that Christensen’s supporters are strong.

Keep doing you, Helena. I, for one, hope you wear bustiers for as long as you love them.

Pete Davidson Left a Gig After the Club Owner Joked About Ariana Grande and Kate Beckinsale

Pete Davidson‘s personal life has been a hot-button topic ever since last summer, when news broke he was dating Ariana Grande. His relationship with actress Kate Beckinsale recently ended, and it was just as high-profile. But it seems the Saturday Night Live star doesn’t want his past romances interfering with his work, as evidenced by what happened at the Stress Factory Comedy Club in Bridgeport, Connecticut on Monday night, April 29. According to Us Weekly, Davidson left his gig before he even performed after the club’s owner made jokes about Beckinsale and Grande.

A source tells the magazine the owner went out on stage before Davidson’s set and, “in an obvious attempt to embarrass [him], sarcastically said, ‘Don’t ask any questions about his exes Ariana Grande or Kate Beckinsale.’”

Davidson posted about the incident on his Instagram Story late Monday night. “I’m sorry that we had to leave the show before I got to go on,” he said. “The owner, Vinnie Brand, disrespected me and did something I told him not to do. I can’t perform under those circumstances.”

“Pete was not about to to let this guy ruin his show, disrespect him and abuse the names of women Pete respects and cares about,” the source also added to Us Weekly. “Pete has been doing great. He’s happy and has been really enjoying traveling and doing shows. It’s sad that people like this club owner would pull a stunt like this just to bring attention to himself and his club.”

Some audience members took to Twitter after what happened and voiced their support for Pete Davidson. “Yo the owner of the Stress Factory CT was wild, uncalled for and disrespectful to Pete so I don’t blame him for bouncing, I would’ve too,” one fan tweeted.

“I don’t think it’s asking too much that a comedian wants to show up, perform, greet fans, and bounce. Without having their balls busted about who they dated,” wrote another.