13 Women Who Wear Their Mastectomy Scars Like Badges of Honor

“I was diagnosed in October 2018 with stage II breast cancer. Then in April 2020, I was diagnosed with stage IV secondary breast cancer of the bones. I had an unsuccessful lumpectomy, so I had to have a mastectomy. I made myself look at my scar every day. It was a long journey to loving it, but there was never doubt that I would fall in love with the scar. I was on holiday and I took a picture in the sea showing my scar, and that was the game changer. I didn’t care who saw. I didn’t care what people thought. That scar saved my life, and I’ll forever wear it as a badge of honor.” —Trina Cleary

“I found a lump in my right breast and was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer in August 2019. At the time, I was also 15-weeks pregnant. To continue with my pregnancy and treat the cancer, my only option was to have a mastectomy. Losing my breast was really tough. I was embarrassed, I couldn’t bear to look at myself, and there was a period where I didn’t hug anyone in case they could feel the physical difference. But over time, I have been sharing my story, and knowing that I am helping others who are in a similar position has been hugely beneficial. I have learned to love my scars, and I am so proud of my body and what it has been through.” —Lizzi England

13 Women Who Wear Their Mastectomy Scar Like a Badge of Honor

On January 25, 2018, I was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. I had a double mastectomy. Cancer has taken a lot from me, but it has also given me a sense of purpose. Once healed, I decided to empower others by sharing my scars because they tell a powerful story—my story. Many people contacted me, thanking me for being courageous. That made me think I went through this for a reason: to empower, educate and advocate for myself and others. My scars are the tools that I use to help others. —Erika Silver

Katelyn Broad/@katelyn.broad

I was diagnosed with stage IIB breast cancer on January 10, 2017, and on the day before my 28th birthday, I had my left breast removed. I’m going to be honest: It’s taken me awhile to accept and love my scars. It wasn’t until recently that I’ve been proud of them and able to show them off. I’ve been on a long, hard journey, and that came with a lot of self-love and healing. I also have an amazing support system behind me, pushing me to stay positive. I’ve accepted that I will no longer look down and see my breast, but a beautiful scar—a scar that saved my life. —Katelyn Broad

Courtesy of Trina Cleary/@tri_cleary

13 Women Who Wear Their Mastectomy Scars Like a Badge of Honor

On January 25, 2018, I was diagnosed with stage II breast cancer. I had a double mastectomy. Cancer has taken a lot from me, but it has also given me a sense of purpose. Once healed, I decided to empower others by sharing my scars because they tell a powerful story—my story. Many people contacted me, thanking me for being courageous. That made me think I went through this for a reason: to empower, educate and advocate for myself and others. My scars are the tools that I use to help others. —Erika Silver

Katelyn Broad/@katelyn.broad

I was diagnosed with stage IIB breast cancer on January 10, 2017, and on the day before my 28th birthday, I had my left breast removed. I’m going to be honest: It’s taken me awhile to accept and love my scars. It wasn’t until recently that I’ve been proud of them and able to show them off. I’ve been on a long, hard journey, and that came with a lot of self-love and healing. I also have an amazing support system behind me, pushing me to stay positive. I’ve accepted that I will no longer look down and see my breast, but a beautiful scar—a scar that saved my life. —Katelyn Broad

Courtesy of Trina Cleary/@tri_cleary

The Craft: Legacy Is Full of Clever Nods to the Original

It’s been 24 years since The Craft came out, but fans of all ages still faithfully break it out every time October rolls back around. Starring Rachel True, Fairuza Balk, Robin Tunney, and Neve Campbell, the film’s fearlessly witchy story has largely stood the test of time (not to mention the outfits). And now that witchcraft is more mainstream, The Craft is just as relevant today as it was in 1996. So it’s fitting that this Halloween a sequelThe Craft: Legacy, out now—finally brings the cult classic fully into the present.

Like the original, The Craft: Legacy features a quartet of eye-catching teen witches: Lily (Cailee Spaeny), Tabby (Lovie Simone), Lourdes (Zoey Luna), and Frankie (Gideon Adlon). Together, they explore their growing powers while struggling with challenges from both within the coven and without.

When a movie is as beloved as The Craft, reboots are tricky territory. In the past, rumors of a Craft remake have been met with resounding protests. Why redo the movie at all, and what should a reboot look like? Writer and director Zoe Lister-Jones, a big fan of The Craft herself, admits the project was intimidating, adding that “for many people, that film is perfect.” Part of her intention with the sequel was to create a movie that stands on its own with a brand new plot and characters, yet similar themes. 

The Craft: Legacy is now in theaters.

©Columbia Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection

“Hopefully, this movie can say something new and touch people still who are fans of the original, and a new generation of people who might not have seen it,” she says.

Fans of The Craft will find the movie’s structure familiar, including a few of the most iconic scenes. “I obviously want to pay homage to the original, and there are Easter eggs throughout,” Lister-Jones explains. (And yes, there’s a surprise appearance by an OG cast member.)

But there are more differences than similarities. The new movie features two witches of color, Tabby and Lourdes, rather than one; and for the first time, there’s a trans witch, Lourdes (played by trans Latinx actor Zoey Luna). Instead of turning against their own sisters, the witches battle a common enemy: the patriarchy. Rather than solely worshiping a male deity known as Manon, their magic is far more elemental and homemade. As Tabby says: “Half the battle of having powers is believing you do.”

The Women Hoping to Flip the Senate Are Running on Grit, Volunteer Support, and Orange La Croix.

The women running to flip the Senate are unafraid. 

One woman is an Air Force veteran. She’s been waking up at 3 or 4 a.m., taking care of her young kids, bench-pressing weights, and then getting to work. That’s MJ Hegar—she’s running for Senate in Texas.

One woman is a doctor, and a former Republican, who switched parties in part because of the GOP’s stance on trans rights, and its uncritical support of President Trump. (“My moral compass is saying, ‘I can’t do this anymore’…I can’t be complicit, anymore,” she said.) That’s Barbara Bollier, the Kansan who would be the first woman doctor in the Senate, ever.

And there’s Theresa Greenfield in Iowa—a businesswoman raised on a pig farm, who was widowed at 24 while pregnant. (She and her husband also had a one-year-old.) She can answer the question “what’s the break-even price for a bushel of corn in Iowa this week?” on live TV without breaking a sweat. As a self-proclaimed “scrappy farm kid,” 12 and 14 hour days on the campaign trail don’t bother her.

One week out from the election, the pressure is on for Hegar, Bollier, and Greenfield—three of the women whose races will determine whether power falls into Democratic hands, or remains in the tight grip of the Republicans. If Democrats flip the Senate, their first orders of business will likely be passing a coronavirus relief package, expanding access to affordable healthcare coverage, restoring voting rights, and passing legislation that will help keep this planet inhabitable. 

But to do that, Democrats will need to maintain all of their current 47 seats and gain four more. According to forecasting by 538, Greenfield is slightly favored to win, Bollier’s chances are about one in four, and Hegar’s chances are the slimmest, at just over a one in ten chance. She’s not fazed: “I eat pressure for breakfast,” she tells Glamour. (Other possible seat pickups for Democrats in the Senate include Captain Mark Kelly in Arizona, Jaime Harrison in South Carolina, and Sara Gideon in Maine.)

There is less than one week left to make their cases. For the next few hundred hours, Hegar, Bollier, and Greenfield will be doing everything they can to win. They’ll be up late writing policy, visiting polling lines to meet voters, and holding campaign events in open fields and backlots and over Zoom. “Don’t call me on November 4 because that’s when I’m going to sleep,” says Greenfield, with a laugh. “But between now and then we’re going to be working our fingers to the bone.”

Over the course of the campaign, I have phone-banked for all three women—listening to Kansas union members talk about their excitement over Bollier, chatting with first-time Gen Z voters in Iowa about how badly we need the Affordable Care Act to stay in place, and talking about military service with Texans. Just days before the election, I called the three candidates to ask…how are you, really?

MJ Hegar

Hegar was honorably discharged from the U.S. military after serving three tours in Afghanistan. Her platform focuses on expanding options for affordable, accessible healthcare, ending child separation at the border, raising wages and lowering housing costs, and funding public schools. During a recent Senate hearing, her opponent, incumbent John Cornyn, seemed to dispute the existence of systemic racism.

Glamour: How are you?

16 Edge Control Products to Lay Your Baby Hairs Just Right

There’s no denying that many things have felt out of our hands in 2020, but at least the best edge control products can keep your baby hairs sleek and snatched. With more time spent at home than ever before, you may have found yourself in the mirror crafting creative looks for a scroll-stopping selfie, or maybe you’ve used this time to take extra good care of those delicate baby hairs that are easy to neglect. 

Whatever your beauty vibe or hair journey, the best edge control serums and gels can help you tame the strands that have a mind of their own, and top-rated edge control brushes can offer added control for sleek swirls in all their wavy splendor

Ahead, we rounded up the best edge control products and baby hair brushes that will keep those edges laid for the gods—no matter how out of control the news cycle is that day. Here are the ones shoppers swear by, according to their glowing reviews. 

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Vanderpump Rules Star Scheana Shay Is Pregnant

Check back here for updates on pregnant celebrities, expected babies, due dates, and so much more. (And check here for updates on when the little ones arrived.)

So many celebrities have announced in 2020 that they’re expecting babies. It started in January, when reports surfaced that Michelle Williams was engaged to Hamilton and Fosse/Verdon director Thomas Kail and expecting a child with him. And the announcements have kept rolling since then. We can’t wait to see who else announces they are expecting new little bundles of joy as the year goes on. For now, though, here are all the pregnant celebrities (and those who are expecting a baby by another route) that you’ll be hearing about in 2020. A big congratulations to all of them is in store.

Adele Is Reportedly Dating Rapper Skepta, and Things Are ‘Heating Up’

Queen Adele is dating British rapper Skepta, People magazine reports. 

The two have been linked for a few months now, but this is the first it’s been confirmed to People. “Things have been heating up,” a source tells the outlet. “They run in the same circles in London, and she’s having fun.”

People reports that Adele and Skepta have connected deeply over music, having young children, and coming from the same hometown: Tottenham, London. They’ve known each other for years, as evidenced by a quote Skepta gave to The Evening Standard in 2016. 

“Adele texts me all the time and keeps me in check,” he said, per People. “She speaks to me about how things are going.”

Adele filed for divorce from her husband, Simon Konecki, in 2019, and the two share a son together, Angelo. Skepta, meanwhile, has a 2-year-old daughter, River, from a previous relationship. 

Adele has kept a low profile these past few months but recently re-entered public consciousness by hosting Saturday Night Live on October 24. “Bloooooody hellllll I’m so excited about this!!,” she wrote on Instagram, announcing the news. “And also absolutely terrified! My first ever hosting gig and for SNL of all things!!!! I’ve always wanted to do it as a stand alone moment, so that I could roll up my sleeves and fully throw myself into it, but the time has never been right. But if there was ever a time for any of us to jump head first into the deep end with our eyes closed and hope for the best it’s 2020 right?”

She continued, “Itll be almost 12 years to the day that I first appeared on the show, during an election…which went on to break my career in America, so it feels full circle and I just couldn’t possibly say no! I am besides myself that H.E.R will be the musical guest!! I love her SO much I can’t wait to melt into a flaming hot mess when she performs, then confuse myself while I laugh my arse off in between it all.” 

Looks like Adele has a lot to be celebrating at the moment. 

Here’s How Blake Shelton Reportedly Proposed to Gwen Stefani

Blake Shelton and Gwen Stefani revealed on Tuesday, October 27 that they’re engaged after five years of dating. And now, details of how Shelton popped the question are starting to emerge. 

“Blake had the ring custom-designed, and asked permission from her dad before asking Gwen,” a source tells Us Weekly. “It meant so much to Gwen that Blake was so traditional about it.”

A second source tells the outlet that Shelton did get down on one knee to propose—in his home state of Oklahoma just a few days before the couple broke the news on Instagram

“Hey @gwenstefani thanks for saving my 2020… And the rest of my life.. I love you. I heard a YES,” Shelton wrote on Instagram alongside a pic of himself and Stefani kissing, her engagement ring in full view. 

Blake Shelton and Gwen Stefani, both judges on The Voice, started dating in November 2015. They both were going though divorces at the same time: Shelton with Miranda Lambert, and Stefani with Gavin Rossdale. It’s a situation they’ve each opened up about at different times. 

“It’s not something that anybody could have seen coming, besides God, I guess,” Shelton told Entertainment Tonight in 2016 about his relationship with Stefani. “It doesn’t look like it would make sense, you know? But all I can tell you is, it does. It just makes the most perfect sense for us and where we’re at in our lives. I tell people all the time, ‘Gwen saved my life last year.’ She did, and I think she would probably tell you something similar about me.”

Stefani told Harper’s Bazaar something similar that year. “[Backstage on the set of The Voice] Blake was like, ‘Everybody, before we go out there, I want to let everyone know that by the time this airs, I will be divorced.’” she said. “It was like being handed this gift of a friend who was going through the exact same thing at the exact same time and then everything flipped. It went from horrible to, like, hopeful and like, ‘Wow, God, you just don’t know what’s gonna happen next.’”

Instagram Is Changing Its Nudity Policies to Be More Inclusive of Plus-Size Bodies

In August, Nyome Nicholas-Williams, a plus-size model and activist in the UK, noticed that images of herself holding her breasts on Instagram were being removed. The photos were intended to demonstrate self-love and body positivity—in them she is seated topless, eyes closed, tenderly embracing her body—but instead, they were being marked in violation of Instagram’s community guidelines, which didn’t allow “breast squeezing.” Nicolas-Williams had been posting on Instagram for six years and this was the first time her content had ever been censored.“I was pretty disheartened when I was silenced,” she says.

As a general rule, Instagram doesn’t allow nudity. “This includes photos, videos, and some digitally-created content that show sexual intercourse, genitals, and close-ups of fully-nude buttocks,” their official policy states. It’s not always an exact science: Instagram removes (some) content that shows women’s nipples, but allows photos of post-mastectomy scarring and breastfeeding, for example. 

But while Instagram is full of thin women who artfully pose nude, fat influencers are often forced to go to greater lengths to work around Instagram’s inherent body size bias. 

The censorship of fat bodies—especially fat Black bodies—on social media isn’t new. “As a woman with bigger breasts, it’s impossible to reach from one side to the other and hold your breasts without squeezing them in some way,” says Kelly Augustine, a New York based plus size influencer and model. “Having been in the content creation space for so long it’s something I’m cognizant of and have to work around—because I know things will get censored.”

It’s not just nudity guidelines that disproportionately impact plus size users. Instagram is full of models—mostly thin—in lingerie but when Augustine works with lingerie brands, “I have to be very careful of how I create content for the space because I know that at any given moment someone will flag it or Instagram will just take it down,” she says. “I have a special cup size and I want to share with my audience that options exist but this is the unfortunate reality.”

That reality prompted Nicholas-Wiliams’s response to the removal of her image. She teamed up with activist Gina Martin and photographer Alexandra Cameron to start the #IWantToSeeNyome campaign and wrote an open letter to Instagram’s head Adam Mosseri. Her campaign mobilized her community and immediately gained the support of other powerful women like Jameela Jamil, Munroe Bergdorf and many others, who signed on in support.

Today, Instagram is updating their policies on nudity, to “help ensure all body types are treated fairly.” Nicholas-Williams’s letter caught the attention of Mosseri resulting in a call to discuss her experience. “As we looked into this more closely, we realized it was an instance where our policy on breast squeezing wasn’t being correctly applied,” according to a statement from Instagram. “Hearing her feedback helped us understand where this policy was falling short, and how we could refine it.”

The new update means Instagram will now allow content “where someone is simply hugging, cupping or holding their breasts.” But as Augustine points out, that’s still a gray area for people with larger breasts. Instagram will still ban content where “people squeeze their breasts in a grabbing motion with bent fingers or if there is a clear change in the shape of the breasts.” If there’s any doubt about an image, Instagram says they’ll ask reviewers to leave it up.

Not automatically removing a post based on reports is a step in the right direction, but the new update still doesn’t address how their process often automatically shadow bans Instagram users who get reported, and doesn’t acknowledge the reality of what happens when a plus size person with large breasts holds themselves.

“I don’t think it solves the problem, but it is a step in the right direction, and a step in the direction of change is what I want,” says Nicholas-Williams. “All we want is equality; in 2020, that really shouldn’t be too much to ask.”

Anastasia Garcia is a photographer and body-positive activist in New York City. Follow her on Instagram @anastasiagphoto.