Lea Michele’s Christmas Movie Has Left Me With Many Questions

Warning: Light spoilers ahead.

I haven’t been able to stop thinking about Lea Michele’s holiday-themed romantic comedy, Same Time, Next Christmas, since I watched it last night. It’s your typical, delightful rom-com: An architect, Olivia Anderson (Lea Michele), heads to Hawaii for the holidays, where her family and another family, the Williamses, travel every year for Christmas. For context: Over the years she’s formed a friendship with the Williams’s son, Jeff. But after the Williams matriarch passed away, they stopped going to Hawaii with the Andersons.

Cut to the present day: Olivia is back in Hawaii, and so is the Williams family—including a very hot, very grown-up Jeff (played by Charles Michael Davis). Sparks fly, naturally, but there’s an issue: Olivia has a boyfriend back at home, Gregg (Bryan Greenberg), who surprises her on the trip. A love triangle of sorts unfolds with—spoiler alert—Jeff winning out in the end. You’ll have to watch the movie to find out how this specifically unfolds, but, in my opinion, there was no contest. Jeff is beefy and goofy and was down to go cliff-diving with Olivia. Gregg, meanwhile, would rather run laps than lay on the beach and didn’t want to pack a picnic for his hike with Olivia because he had protein bars. He was hilariously, dramatically un-fun.

“On paper Gregg and Olivia are a great match, but in reality there’s something missing,” Greenberg tells Glamour. “He conflates business with love. He’s looking more for a business partner than a mate. He doesn’t really understand the difference between the two, which in a romantic comedy doesn’t go over well, as you might guess.”

Part of the reason why I couldn’t get enough of Same Time, Next Christmas was that the right choices were just so obvious. Watching Olivia toggle back and forth between Jeff and Gregg felt a lot like watching a scream queen make poor decisions in a horror movie. I shouted at my screen many times while watching Same Time, Next Christmas. It was an absolute blast.

How to Wear White and Pastel Dresses This Winter

Thanks to winter’s gray skies and chilly temps, you’re probably not feeling inspired to add color to your outfits right now—especially the Easter-egg pastels that are usually reserved for spring. But wait! While you might be in inclined to box up your white and pastel dresses until April, we encourage you to keep them in rotation as you start to get chunky-knit-and-jeans fatigue. (It happens to all of us, sooner or later.) Need some style inspiration? Consider the photos below a lesson in cold-weather pastels.

Look for pastel takes on rich fabrics that have the warmth of winter, like Priyanka Chopra’s velvet turtleneck and palazzo pants combo in silvery mint. (Yes, you’ve seen this monochromatic turtleneck ensemble before. This look is ALL the trends.)

Gotham

Similarly, a pastel dress in a cozy knit brings to mind the soft blanket she’d rather be curled up with. Paired with boots in a dove gray—versus a harsher black—the look stays light and soft, but fully winter-ready.

Christian Vierig

This summer’s floaty dresses charmed us with their delicate floral patterns. Introduce yours to your closed-toe footwear, starting with combat-style boots

Christian Vierig

The no-white-past-Labor-Day rule is dumb, but that doesn’t mean the color super-easy to style. One idea: Pair an ivory dress with a shaggy jacket in the same shade and sheer tights that let a little skin peek through. The look says, “winter is here. And she has a touch of ’70s attitude.”

Hanna Lassen

23 Best Engagement Gifts for Couples

Engagement season is upon us and even though the magical time seems blissful and carefree on Instagram, it can become pretty stressful for the happy couple, who start fielding “So when’s the big day?” questions immediately following the congratulations.

Finding the best engagement gifts for your friends can help the lovebirds keep their sanity throughout the initial stages of wedding planning—which is why we asked married, or soon-to-be-married, Glamour editors and real women about the thoughtful gifts they received (or wish they had) following their engagements. From home goods to sex toys, keep scrolling for the best engagement gifts that will make the exciting (yet-low-key-crazy), period of their lives run a bit more smoothly.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Eight People a Day on Average Are Sexually Assaulted in an Uber, According to New Uber Report

It’s the app that made getting into a stranger’s car seem normal. Billed as a safer alternative—for women in particular—to one-man taxis, Uber is now responsible for nearly four million trips a day. But after almost 21 months of data collection, the platform has released an unprecedented safety report, a record of thousands of sexual assaults and over 100 Uber-related deaths. The first of its kind across not just ride-share apps but most big businesses, the 78-page document is a damning account of violence

The review, which Glamour previewed, tabulates and categorizes all reported incidents from 2017 and 2018 and focuses on the most critical: fatalities and sexual assaults. In that period and after around 2.3 billion rides, 107 people died in Uber-related motor vehicle fatalities, 19 people died in Uber-related fatal assaults, and nearly 6,000 people experienced sexual assault—that’s on average eight reports per day and eight more than most of us think about when we open the app to request a ride.

The sexual assault claims run the gamut. For the report, Uber developed five categories of sexual assault, defined in consultation with the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) and the Urban Institute. The names sound clinical—non-consensual kissing of a non-sexual body part, attempted non-consensual sexual penetration, non-consensual touching of a sexual body part, non-consensual kissing of a sexual body part, and non-consensual sexual penetration. But advocates stress that consistent taxonomies for assault are essential; the fact that we don’t have them is just one of countless reasons it’s been so hard to put reforms in place. And no matter how dispassionate the tone, the numbers are a gut punch: 464 reports in 2017 and 2018 claim the most serious offense—non-consensual sexual penetration (of which most of those victims were riders; 92% overall). But the data also points to a less recognized problem—assaults on vulnerable drivers. Across all five sexual assault categories, the percentages of drivers and riders who report even out. Drivers, who have few defenses against intoxicated users, report assaults at more or less the same rate as riders.

In an introduction to the data, Uber stresses that 99.9% of Uber trips—of which there are now close to 4 million per day—“end without anything going wrong or anyone contacting us” and that the “vast majority” of the .1% of reports that Uber does receive are not safety-related at all. (True, but context that Uber repeats more than once in a document that also details hundreds of cases of serious assault. The effect is somewhat disquieting.)

Clean Skin Care Routines: 4 Women With Great Skin Share Theirs

We all have those Instagram accounts we check daily, turn post notifications on for, and refer to in conversation like they’re our actual friends. If you’ve ever scrolled onto one of these photos and wondered, How does she do it? you’re in luck. Welcome to our series Insta Stalking, in which we talk to the women behind the accounts we’re obsessing over about their beauty secrets. Below, four women with great skin share their clean skin care routines.

Thanks in part to the internet, we now have more information than ever about what we are actually putting on (and into) our bodies. As women gain awareness and interest in what’s in their products, the “clean beauty” movement has rapidly grown. While there’s nothing wrong with pushing for products that are better for us and the planet, there are so many buzzwords—clean, green, natural, organic—floating around that it’s hard to sort through the noise. Add to the fact that every retailer and brand has their own definition of the word clean, and things can get a little murky.

Generally speaking, clean beauty refers to products free of parabens, sulfates, phthalates, and artificial fragrance (again, this varies depending on who you ask), but has grown to lump products with all-natural or organic ingredients. Some also take sustainability into account. There’s also a lot misinformed stereotypes associated with clean beauty: That it’s crunchy (think more Whole Foods than Sephora), ineffective, or expensive, which can make going green intimidating. To make things a little easier, we asked four women who are passionate about clean beauty to define what it means to them, and share their clean skin care routines. Read on for the products they can’t live without.

Gabby Azorsky, 23, e-commerce sales assistant in Brooklyn

The beauty industry is fairly unregulated, so it’s important to me to use products with ingredients and from companies that I trust (I follow the EU’s standards as a guideline, which has stricter policies than the US). Sometimes I’ll use a product that isn’t “clean” for special occasions or a fun makeup look, but for daily wear, keeping it clean makes me feel like myself.

I eat colorfully, organic, and as unprocessed as possible, and think of my personal care in the same way. Eating lots of leafy greens, nourishing foods, and drinking plenty of water is the most important part of my skin care routine. Product-wise, I like to keep it simple. I have a few core products that I stick to, and then rotate or play with new products as I run out. I also generally switch out my cleanser and face oil with the seasons.

Amazon’s 10 Bestselling Books of 2019

2019 was a year for the books. Literally. Throughout the year, authors published works that inspired us, challenged us, and also gave us an escape. We saw new work from legendary author Margaret Atwood, were floored by newcomer Casey McQuiston’s debut romance novel, Red White & Royal Blue, and couldn’t get enough of author and survivor Chanel Miller’s triumphant memoir, Know My Name. Our “TBR” lists were long, and rich with incredible reading material.

As 2019 comes to a close, Amazon decided to take a look back at some of their most popular titles of the year. The books that customers shopped the most. From Michelle Obama’s memoir, Becoming—which was the highest-selling work of non-fiction on the site—to Delia Owens’ New York Times bestselling Where the Crawdads Sing.

Read on for the books that Amazon customers couldn’t get enough of. And consider giving your loved ones a break from the world for the holidays—through the power of the written word.

Most Sold Books, Fiction

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama by Robert Louis Stevenson and Marty Ross

Buy Now

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Buy Now

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Amazon

$16

Buy Now

Most Sold Books, Non-Fiction

Becoming by Michelle Obama

Amazon

$12

Buy Now

Educated by Tara Westover

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$13

Buy Now

Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

Amazon

$18

Buy Now

Amazon’s 10 Best-Selling Books of 2019

This was a year for the books. Literally. Throughout 2019, authors published works that inspired us, challenged us, and also gave us an escape. We saw new work from legendary author Margaret Atwood, were floored by newcomer Casey McQuiston’s debut romance novel, Red, White & Royal Blue, and couldn’t get enough of author and survivor Chanel Miller‘s triumphant memoir, Know My Name. Our TBR lists were long, and rich with incredible reading material.

As 2019 comes to a close, Amazon takes a look back at some of their most popular titles of the year. The books that customers shopped the most. From Michelle Obama’s memoir, Becoming—which was the highest-selling work of nonfiction on the site—to Delia Owens’s New York Times–best-selling Where the Crawdads Sing.

Read on for the books that Amazon customers couldn’t get enough of. And consider giving your loved ones a break from the world for the holidays—through the power of the written word.

Most Sold Books, Fiction

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Treasure Island: An Audible Original Drama by Robert Louis Stevenson and Marty Ross

Buy Now

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Buy Now

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Amazon

$16

Buy Now

Most Sold Books, Nonfiction

Becoming by Michelle Obama

Amazon

$12

Buy Now

Educated by Tara Westover

Amazon

$14

Buy Now

Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$10

Buy Now

Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis

Amazon

$13

Buy Now

Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

Amazon

$18

Buy Now

Leave The Peloton Bike Ad Lady Alone

Peloton, a company that sells (checks notes) bikes that don’t go anywhere, is worth nearly 10 billion dollars. But the latest Peloton Bike ad—you know, the 30-second spot that went viral and drew comparisons to the brainwashed family from Get Out—just lost the company almost one billion dollars and sparked an endless stream of Twitter hot takes.

In case you’ve been sitting this internet controversy out, the infamous ad—which shows a woman receiving a Peloton bike from her husband for Christmas, then tracking her progress over the year by vlogging her rides—touched a nerve with millions of people. Critics called it “sexist,” “body shaming,” “abusive” and “dystopian.” Something about the sleek aesthetic of the ad, coupled with a plot involving a man getting his wife exercise equipment—equipment she takes to like a hamster on a wheel—unleashed a kind of public anguish.

Comedian Eva Victor’s very funny parody of the ad has over three million views:

Watch the ad for yourself:

Normally we’re all for any outcry about perceived sexism. But the intensity of the anger over the Peloton bike ad has its own eeriness. The woman in the ad is not being “abused” or “controlled,” and insistence that she is suggests that women can’t make their own choices about their desires and their bodies. America has an obsession with thinness, and that can’t be disentangled from exercise crazes like Peloton. But it’s also oddly disrespectful to act like exercising—albeit on fancy equipment and for social media glory—is something women do solely to please men. It’s just more complicated than that.

It’s ironic that the company so garbled their message in this ad, because so many women have been open about finding friendship and wellness through Peloton that have nothing to do with fitness—or their partners. The hundreds of thousands of women who have created networks based on their at-home workouts can’t be reduced to a reaction to the male gaze. How hard would it have been to make an ad about what so many Peloton women actually seem to have a cult-like devotion to: community.

Maybe part of the anger over the Peloton bike ad is how accurately it reflects consumerism right now, and how uncomfortable that makes us. Peloton Lady and her (maybe evil) Peloton Husband live in a pristine, open concept house with hardwood floors, high windows, and one very well-behaved child. Peloton Lady’s skin is dewey but matte. She comes home from work in block-heeled pumps and a cream-colored coat with a statement lip. She wakes up in matching menswear separates. Everything the Peloton family owns is minimalist but perfect, like it all came from prestige direct-to-consumer startup brands.

It’s a very 2019 fantasy. And when we see clearly that our deeply held fantasy is also a carefully calculated bid by a private company to make money, it suddenly feels more like a nightmare. Friends, Romans, countrymen determined to rescue Peloton Lady from her living hell, consider this hot take: The Peloton Lady isn’t a hostage, but we are.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

43 Best Gifts for Kids in 2019: Shop for Babies, Toddlers, Tweens, and Teens

If Cyber Monday was any indication, there’s no shortage of gifts for kids on the market right now. But little ones are discerning and, adorably, some of the harshest critics out there, so you’re going to want presents that impress—and won’t end up in the back of their closet. A gift that won’t just make their eyes glow, but also be memorable and useful.

Whether you’re a parent or a cool aunt, we know you want to score brownie points, so we rounded up the best gifts for kids (think babies, toddlers, tweens, and teens!) that are sure to be used more than once or twice. If you’ve got a future chef, astronaut, physician or coding genius on your list, we’ve got you covered. Scroll on for the coolest toys and presents that are fun to buy, and even more fun to watch being unwrapped.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Spotify Wrapped 2019: How to Find Out Your Most-Played Songs of the Year

You’ve probably noticed your friends starting to share their top Spotify songs of 2019, along with their other streaming habits, courtesy of Spotify Wrapped. It is, after all, the time of year when your feed is inundated with “best of” lists, summing up the last 12 months of entertainment and culture. And with 2019, we also happen to be at the end of a decade, which means even more content.

These lists are certainly fun to read (and argue about), but what we love even more is looking back at our own lives over the course of the past year—or ten. So how are your friends finding these fun facts and graphics about their music stats?

There are a couple of ways to do it. and they both involve Spotify Wrapped. First, you can simply go to spotify.com/wrapped and log in to your account. You’ll be greeted with all your streaming trends from the past year and more. “This year, your Wrapped will include the songs, albums, artists, and podcasts you discovered throughout 2019, plus the artists you streamed the most throughout the decade on Spotify. It’s ‘Wrapped’ the way you love it—but with more nostalgia than ever before,” the company said in a release.

For the first time this year, you’ll also be able to access Wrapped via your Spotify app. Once there, you’ll discover your top artist, top song through each season, top podcasts, genres, and total minutes streamed in 2019. Plus the results are easily shareable to your social media feeds, including Instagram Stories, Facebook, Snapchat, and Twitter. You can also instantly add your most played songs to your library, if for some reason they’re not already there.

Perhaps the most shocking information will come via exactly how many minutes you’ve spent streaming Spotify in 2019—even if you want to keep that information to yourself.

Next up after #SpotifyWrapped in the year-end generator line will surely be the Instagram #TopNine, right?