Watching Mariah Carey on Billy on the Street Is a Masterclass in Christmas Joy

Mariah Carey celebrated Christmas and Hanukkah on a holiday segment of Billy on the Street with Billy Eichner. She hugged strangers, conversed in Swedish, and performed a minor DIY crafting project.

The video, released online on December 16, is six blissful minutes of the legendary diva canvassing the streets of Manhattan, trying to be a good sport but looking like she’s getting her adult braces tightened. It’s 367 seconds of the Queen of Christmas descending from her throne to connect with her subjects during the darkest days of the year. It’s butterflies and mistletoes and menorahs and a very funny look into the celebrity-industrial complex. Let’s go Lambily, let’s go.

This year is the 25th anniversary of the Mariah Carey Christmas album, which includes the greatest Christmas song of the last 100 years, All I Want for Christmas Is You, which she says in the video she wrote in “fully, maybe an hour and a half.” The song’s power is not to be dismissed–after two and a half decades, it became a number one song literally during the writing of this article.

The 49-year-old—draped in crimson and trimmed in gold, hair like a butterscotch waterfall, contour casting a dramatic shadow like Santa himself leaping out of a fireplace—joined Eichner in his favorite activity: accosting people on the streets of New York with questions and demands.

Most episodes of Billy on the Street, Eichner’s beloved gameshow, take place during daylight. Mariah’s nighttime segment seems both more seasonally whimsical and also makes me wonder if she has a rider that says she won’t appear on camera in direct sunlight. Hopefully they gave her whatever she wanted—it’s clear that a master is at work here. In the course of the short video she: sings “I Have A Little Dreidel” from memory, speaks Swedish then appropriately acknowledges that she is showing off, kindly validates a man who says he was both naughty and nice this year, shakes hands with a puppy, and participates in a group hug.

It is written all over Mariah Carey’s face that she longs to be stretched out before a roaring fire in a remote chalet, drinking Veuve as a manservant drops by with a velvet-lined hutch filled with baby bunnies for her amusement. Her gameness to participate in this activity, which seems to represent everything I imagine she loathes (lack of creative control, unfettered contact with random people, etc) feels loving. This woman who has already given us so much—she’s the female singer with the greatest number of Billboard 100 number-one hits in history, as Billy points out—is still willing to totter around carrying a heart-eyes emoji Christmas ornament, trying to get strangers to kiss.

Mariah Carey’s voice sounds like sparkles and the taste of eggnog, her songs jolt the heart, and her presence as an improviser is deliciously uncomfortable. Like most of the Billy on the Street videos, her on-the-street segment gently reminds us that, like politicians, celebrities need us more than we need them. Part of Billy Eichner’s genius is to expose the mechanisms of that relationship without being mean, and with Mariah, who’s so beloved yet typically aloof, he is especially successful. Fans and celebrities are a weird, symbiotic family of entertainers and the entertained, passing each other on dark streets, trying to have moments of joy. And also, in Mariah’s case, to establish appropriate boundaries. And may it be so, for us all. ‘Tis the season to have balance.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

Watching Mariah Carey on ‘Billy on the Street’ Is a Master Class in Christmas Joy

Mariah Carey celebrated Christmas and Hanukkah on a holiday segment of Billy on the Street with Billy Eichner. She hugged strangers, conversed in Swedish, and performed a minor DIY crafting project.

The video, released online on December 16, is six blissful minutes of the legendary diva canvassing the streets of Manhattan, trying to be a good sport but looking like she’s getting her adult braces tightened. It’s 367 seconds of the queen of Christmas descending from her throne to connect with her subjects during the darkest days of the year. It’s butterflies and mistletoes and menorahs and a very funny look into the celebrity-industrial complex. Let’s go, Lambily, let’s go.

This year is the 25th anniversary of the Mariah Carey Christmas album, which includes the greatest Christmas song of the last 100 years, All I Want for Christmas Is You, which she says in the video she wrote in “fully, maybe an hour and a half.” The song’s power is not to be dismissed—after two and a half decades, it became a number one song literally during the writing of this article.

The 49-year-old—draped in crimson and trimmed in gold, hair like a butterscotch waterfall, contour casting a dramatic shadow like Santa himself leaping out of a fireplace—joined Eichner in his favorite activity: accosting people on the streets of New York City with questions and demands.

Most episodes of Billy on the Street, Eichner’s beloved game show, take place during daylight. Carey’s nighttime segment seems both more seasonally whimsical and also makes me wonder if she has a rider that says she won’t appear on camera in direct sunlight. Hopefully, they gave her whatever she wanted—it’s clear that a master is at work here. In the course of the short video she: sings “I Have a Little Dreidel” from memory, speaks Swedish, then appropriately acknowledges that she is showing off, kindly validates a man who says he was both naughty and nice this year, shakes hands with a puppy, and participates in a group hug.

It is written all over Carey’s face that she longs to be stretched out before a roaring fire in a remote chalet, drinking Veuve as a manservant drops by with a velvet-lined hutch filled with baby bunnies for her amusement. Her gameness to participate in this activity, which seems to represent everything I imagine she loathes (lack of creative control, unfettered contact with random people, etc.) feels loving. This woman who has already given us so much—she’s the female singer with the greatest number of Billboard 100 number one hits in history, as Billy points out—is still willing to totter around carrying a heart-eyes emoji Christmas ornament, trying to get strangers to kiss.

Carey’s voice sounds like sparkles and the taste of eggnog, her songs jolt the heart, and her presence as an improviser is deliciously uncomfortable. Like most of the Billy on the Street videos, her on-the-street segment gently reminds us that, like politicians, celebrities need us more than we need them. Part of Eichner’s genius is to expose the mechanisms of that relationship without being mean, and with Carey, who’s so beloved yet typically aloof, he is especially successful. Fans and celebrities are a weird, symbiotic family of entertainers and the entertained, passing each other on dark streets, trying to have moments of joy. And also, in Carey’s case, to establish appropriate boundaries. And may it be so, for us all. ’Tis the season to have balance.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

Tiffani Thiessen Talks About Her Iconic Characters and Working with Woody Allen

In March 2016 at 8:31 p.m. I tweeted the following: “I really really wish I were friends with Tiffani Thiessen.” I have no idea what made me put that out into the world at that very moment, but I can tell you it’s totally true. I feel like there are few people on TV I can truly say I’ve grown up watching and still care about, and Tifffani’s one of them. I’ve always just gotten a good vibe from her and was curious to talk about what it’s like playing two iconic roles—Kelly Kapowski on Saved by the Bell and Valerie Malone on Beverly Hills, 90210. was also excited to hear about her new role on the charming Netflix show Alexa & Katie.

Before our chat, we spoke on the phone to go over what outfit she’d be talking about and I was surprised by her pick. Tiffani wanted to talk about what she wore to a red carpet premiere that she described as a fairytale—it was for her first big movie, Hollywood Ending, and she was handpicked to be in the film by Woody Allen. This gave me pause—the filmmaker has been accused by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow of sexual abuse, which Allen has denied.

Tiffani was dressed by Giorgio Armani himself for her first Cannes film festival to promote 2002’s Hollywood Ending.

J. Vespa

Since the accusation, several stars have vowed not to work with him. For Tiffani Thiessen, though, the moment in question was more about going from being a TV star in teen shows to having a legitimate movie star moment—listen to her describe walking the iconic red Cannes stairs—and being dressed by one of the most well-known designers in the world, Georgio Armani to promote Hollywood Ending in France and in New York.

Also in Armani for the New York premiere of Hollywood Ending in 2002.

Ron Galella

We also talked about what Tiffani bought herself when she realized she was actually making some real money (she admitted she was at the Gucci store a lot in the ’90s), how her style has changed after becoming a mom to two kids, what it was like going through puberty on national television, Valerie Malone’s combat boots, and how we have her to thank for that weird ’90s trend in which we left our top jeans button undone.

Here’s the episode!

Follow host Perrie Samotin on Instagram @perriesamotin, guest Tiffani Thiessen at @tiffanithiessen, and subscribe to What I Wore When on Apple Podcasts or where ever you listen to your favorite shows.

The Best Gifts for Runners, All Approved By Someone Who’s Run All the Miles

The best gifts for runners probably aren’t as obvious as you think. Running shoes come to mind, for example, but unless you know the exact brand, style, and size your runner prefers, you’re going to strike out. (Many runners are more loyal to their running shoes than they are to their families.) You should also steer clear of the mysterious running gadgets that are tempting you from the racks by the register. Instead, consider the actual best gifts for runners below, which all have been vetted and tested by a longtime runner. (Me.)

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

A Sober Holiday Season Doesn’t Have to Be Boring

Then came a real test: a season soaked with social stress and opportunities to take the edge off with a mug of mulled wine. “I felt like something was missing without drinking and I had a lot of despair, thinking it would always be that way,” McKowen says.

As hard as it was, the experience of having a sober holiday season was still hugely empowering for McKowen—as it was for me. When I woke up the next morning having survived my first sober Christmas Day for more than 20 years, I felt an overwhelming sense of pride, as well as an even stronger belief in my choice. “I realized how much I’d been missing and how alcohol made an already tricky season even more so,” McKowen says. “By the time my second sober holiday season came around, it was a totally different experience. I love the holidays now. They are a lot simpler and focused on the things we want the holidays to be about: gratitude, reflection, community.”

If you’re sober this season, or simply looking to be more mindful of your drinking, here’s some advice from those of us who have been there.

1. Remind yourself why you’re choosing not to drink.

Warrington recommends having a really clear idea of the reasons you’re choosing not to drink. You might be fed up with hangovers, want to save money, or have a fitness goal you’re striving for. “Focus on what you’re creating space for in your life by cutting out booze,” she says. “I always say, the only thing you’re missing out on by not drinking is getting drunk”

2. Keep an open mind.

If, like Warrington, your first sober holiday season is motivated by curiosity—What would happen if I didn’t end up doing a drunken rendition of “Santa Baby” this year?— her advice is to keep an open mind. “Assume you’re going to have fun,” she says. “For me, sober parties were more strange than anything, as I was so used to having a drink in my hand it felt odd not to, but I soon got used to it and enjoyed the freedom of being able to leave whenever I wanted.”

3. Know when to sit out.

If the whole idea of being sober at a party is just one step too far, that’s absolutely fine. “You don’t have to go to the party. Really. You don’t,” McKowen says. “So many of the parties, dinners, and obligations we commit to are optional. It doesn’t occur to us that we can simply back out and take the pressure off.”

4. Plan ahead.

When it comes to the social events you do want to go to it really helps to plan ahead. McKowen recommends having someone to check in with before, during and after the event, both to keep you accountable to sobriety and help emotionally.

Harvey Weinstein Claims He’s a ‘Forgotten Man’ in New Interview

Harvey Weinstein is still in the middle of criminal proceedings on sexual assault charges, is soon due back in court, and has reached a tentative $25 million settlement with some of his accusers (which insurance will cover), but he still thinks he’s a victim in this situation.

The disgraced former movie mogul whom dozens of women have accused of sexual misconduct seems to be looking for sympathy in a new interview with the New York Post. Oh, and he would also like credit for all the work he did for women.

“I feel like the forgotten man,” he said. “I made more movies directed by women and about women than any filmmaker, and I’m talking about 30 years ago. I’m not talking about now when it’s vogue. I did it first! I pioneered it! It all got eviscerated because of what happened,” Weinstein said. “My work has been forgotten.”

Never mind that “what happened” was a whole lot of alleged abuse.

“I want this city to recognize who I was instead of what I’ve become,” he continued. Weinstein used a few examples from his past to try to make his point. “Gwyneth Paltrow in 2003 got $10 million to make a movie called View from the Top,” he said. “She was the highest-paid female actor in an independent film. Higher-paid than all the men.” He also cited “social issues” taken on in movies from his companies, Miramax and The Weinstein Company. “I understood the celebratory nature of the film [Paris Is Burning] and bought the distribution rights,” he said. “The same thing is true for Transamerica [for] which Felicity Huffman got an Academy Award.” (Huffman was nominated for an Oscar for her role in 2006, but did not win.)

In response to Weinstein’s interview, 23 women—including Judd, McGowan, and Rosanna Arquette—released the following statement to USA Today.

“Harvey Weinstein is trying to gaslight society again. He says in a new interview he doesn’t want to be forgotten. Well, he won’t be. He will be remembered as a sexual predator and an unrepentant abuser who took everything and deserves nothing,” The Silence Breakers said. “He will be remembered by the collective will of countless women who stood up and said enough. We refuse to let this predator rewrite his legacy of abuse.”

Best Gifts for Travelers: 19 Holiday Gifts for Anyone Who’s Always Traveling

Being constantly on-the-go can be taxing. Help frequent travelers remove some of the stress from the equation: Add any (or all) of the best gifts for travelers to your holiday shopping list. They’ll be well-prepared the next time they hit the road, and thrilled with the difference these items make in their travel experience.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Vanna White Has the Greatest Job in the World—And She Knows It

For White, Sajak and the rest of the Wheel team are her family; just one of the perks that makes White “love everything about [her] job.” And the perks are plentiful. Take the show’s taping schedule. An entire season is filmed in just 35 shoots per year, dolled out in increments of four days a month. (Which in earlier years allowed her the freedom to almost always take her now-adult children to school, and be there when they got home.) Call-time begins at 8 a.m., with six shows shooting back-to-back until production wraps around 6 p.m. White has the schedule down to a science. She manages outfit changes in under 3 minutes—thanks to her pre-paired dresses, accessories, and shoes—and gets in reps with 10-pound weights between takes.

Stephen Crise

In her role she’s worn over 7,000 gowns (never having repeated a look, and constantly varying their style), has made it into the Guinness Book of World Records for being the most frequent clapper in history (averaging 600 claps per episode), and has even earned herself a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She’s traveled far and wide to film Wheel’s special episodes, like a recent visit to the Downton Abbey castle. “We’ve been to Ireland, Switzerland, England, Scotland, and everywhere in the United States,” says White. “In Alaska they put me on a glacier and shot me from above in a helicopter. And here I am, standing as far as I can see, just white, white, white, on this glacier. It was awesome.”

White’s enthusiasm for her job is matched only by her audience’s zeal for her. In the ‘80s, the fanfare around America’s favorite letter-turner hit such a fever pitch that it was dubbed “Vannamania.” White remembers, “Standing in line at the grocery store [in the ‘80s] and seeing myself on the cover of Newsweek. I thought, ‘Oh my goodness, gosh, I guess I’ve made it.’” White was the girl-next-door, done good. And in pop culture her name became ubiquitous with over-the-top success. Weird Al Yankovic went on to release, “Stuck In A Closet With Vanna White.” Later, Nelly rapped about “paying cash, first class, sittin’ next to Vanna White” in his early aughts hit, “Ride Wit Me.” And over the years White has been invited to play herself in episodes of popular TV shows from The King of Queens to Fresh Off the Boat.

Ron Slenzak

Of course, there have been critics—both of White, and women in her line of work. Feminists have challenged the mere existence of game show roles like “briefcase girl” (which helped catapult both Chrissy Teigen and Meghan Markle to fame on Deal or No Deal) or the ever-pervasive silent and smiling female co-host who exist purely to look good in a sequined dress next to their male counterparts. Though White has made a name for herself on the show in her own right and says she feels, “equal” to Sajak, her detractors are voluble, calling her names like “bimbo,” “dumb blonde,” and “real-life barbie doll” and often weaponizing the same sexist tropes they claim to want to overturn. One article even posed the question, “How much Vanna can we Stanna?”

Hallmark Apologizes After Backlash for Pulling an Ad That Featured Two Brides Kissing

This past weekend, there was a lot of controversy around the Hallmark Channel—right in the middle of the network’s jam-packed “Countdown to Christmas” season.

In case you missed it, here’s what went down. Zola, a wedding planning website, aired a number of ads on the channel including some that featured same-sex couples. The conservative group One Million Moms took issue with a particular ad featuring two brides (briefly) kissing and started a petition to have it removed. “The Hallmark Channel has always been known for its family friendly movies. Even its commercials are usually safe for family viewing. But unfortunately, that is not the case anymore,” the petition reads. “Recently, One Million Moms received concerns about Hallmark airing a commercial from Zola.com in which two lesbians are shown kissing at the end of their wedding ceremony. Similar concerns from regular viewers are posted on an online complaint board for the Hallmark Channel.”

Initially, Hallmark decided to pull four of the six ads from the Zola campaign. “The decision not to air overt public displays of affection in our sponsored advertisement, regardless of the participants, is in line with our current policy, which includes not featuring political advertisements, offensive language, R-rated movie content and many other categories,” a Hallmark spokesman told the New York Times on Friday, December 13. However, one ad that featured a bride and groom kissing was not pulled.

The online backlash to this was swift.

Now, Hallmark reps have announced that the network is reversing the decision. “We are truly sorry for the hurt and disappointment this has caused,” Hallmark CEO Mike Perry said in a statement. “Across our brand, we will continue to look for ways to be more inclusive and celebrate our differences.” He also said “Hallmark Channel will be reaching out to Zola to reestablish our partnership and reinstate the commercials.”

I Lived Like a Downton Abbey Character for 3 Days, and Now the Regular World Is Ruined

Somewhere in the English countryside last week, I was wearing a tiara worth an estimated $195,000 and gliding around a palatial manor. I’ve never been one to care about things like jewlery or clothes, but in that moment I remember thinking, “Yup, this feels right. I’m a royal now.” But then I had to take the tiara off and return to my humdrum, boring life. In what world is that fair? Where is the justice? Better yet, where is my crown?

Now that I’ve had a taste for the royal, finer things in life, I never want to go back. My tiara fitting was just one of the many opulent experiences I had while visiting Hampshire and Highclere, England, the historic locations of the Downton Abbey television series and movie, the latter which hits Blu-ray and DVD on December 17. As you know, the Crawleys aren’t royals themselves, but they did host the king and queen of England at Downton in the movie. And Highclere Castle, the setting of Downton Abbey, is itself quite aristocratic, so there really is no better place to first experience living like a lord or lady (except perhaps Buckingham Palace).

“How much does a banana cost, anyway? $10?” — me after putting on this crown.