How to Get Out of Bed When It’s Too Cold Outside, According to Celebrities

It’s still winter. Politics sucks, the weather sucks, and we’re all sick of being inside. Our Winteritis stories are for women who can’t read another think piece, who’ve pushed the outer limits of time it’s possible to spend on social media, and who kind of want to shop online and hibernate until spring is here.

The first thing I saw outside my window this morning was snow, which made rustling out of bed a thousand times harder. When it’s full-on winter, the temptation to just stay in bed and neglect all your responsibilities is so strong. “How can I possibly be expected to do anything when the weather is this miserable?” I say to myself before remembering, “Um, you need that check.”

That’s my motivation for getting out of bed, but everyone’s is different. Maybe you’re a morning person and like cooking breakfast. Maybe you have a new Lush shower gel you’re excited to try out. Or maybe you want to squeeze in an early-A.M. workout. Some people are into that sort of thing!

These 13 celebrities, below, all have varied reasons for fighting against the cold and unfurling from their blankets. But take comfort in this: Some of them find it just as hard as you. —Reporting by Jessica Radloff, Glamour’s west coast editor

Fighting With My Family Is Reviving the Forgotten Female Sports Movie Genre

Lately, I’ve been deep in my feels about 2000s-era movies and TV. I blame Pen15, Hulu‘s new series about a pair of 13-year-old BFFs set in 2000. It made me realize that pop culture in the aughts gave me everything I needed to survive as a preteen: chat rooms, a Beyoncé solo career, and the foundation of all my feminist creeds.

As a tomboyish, hyperactive, athletic kid, I spent most of my time playing sports, watching movies about sports, and obsessing over the female stars of sports movies in a way that I would later come to understand as “being gay.” The timing was perfect—films about female athletes were booming in the 2000s. Movies like Bend It Like Beckham, Stick It, and She’s the Man were my lifeblood growing up, because I identified so much with the young women in them. They were often facing discrimination for just being themselves, or feeling othered. I loved that they were funny, sporty, a little gay (at least aesthetically), and uhh…hot. They were my Sporty Spice heroes. But somewhere along the way, we lost touch with our inner-Mia Hamms. Movies like Blue Crush fell to the wayside, and we stopped sliming female athletes at the Kids Choice Awards. Society still stans top female athletes—hello, Serena Williams—but most of pop culture has dropped their narratives.

So when I saw Fighting With My Family, the new female wrestling comedy from Stephen Merchant that’s in theaters now, I was galvanized. It’s eccentric, heartwarming, laugh-out-loud funny, and inspirational. It left me feeling utterly nostalgic for my adolescence. Laughing along was like muscle memory.

The best films in the subgenre of female sports movies either take a niche sport, like roller derby in Whip It, and invite us into an unexplored world or they shine a light on the hardships women face pursuing a career in a popular sport, like soccer in Bend It Like Beckham. Fighting With My Family accomplished both. The movie, which was produced by former WWE star Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson himself, drops us into the lion’s den of professional wrestling and promises to make us overnight fans.

It follows the real-life story of WWE wrestler Paige (whose real name is Saraya-Jade Bevis; Paige is her wrestling name) and her journey to becoming the youngest Diva’s champion in history. Played by Florence Pugh, Paige comes from an outrageous, wrestling-obsessed family of criminals. Her eldest brother (James Burrows) is in prison. Her father (Nick Frost) was jailed numerous times for, in his own words, “mainly violence.” Her mom, played by a lip-ringed, grungy Lena Headey, was suicidal when she met Paige’s father, but reminisces about the moment like a romantic comedy meet-cute. Paige comes from a pack of odd balls, and her combative family is the only place that makes her feel at home.

Sound familiar? The heartbeat of the 2000s sports comedy was quirky environments. In Whip It, Ellen Page’s character, Bliss, falls head over heels in love with her roller derby team, a flock of pugnacious, tattooed fuck-ups who make her feel safe while participating in a violent and niche sport. The same goes for Stick It and Bend It Like Beckham, where our protagonists find love and safety in their very own pack of weirdos. But the girls aren’t weirdos—they’re likeminded people who found shelter in each other from a world that made them feel othered.

In Fighting With My Family, Paige is lucky to find this security in her actual family. But once she goes big league, auditioning for the WWE and actually getting signed as a professional wrestler, she feels rejected by the bright lights, hot bodies, and the seemingly insurmountable amount of pressure that comes with competing professionally. She’s homesick.

‘Fighting With My Family’ Is Reviving the Forgotten Genre of Female Sports Movies

Lately I’ve been deep in my feels about 2000s-era movies and TV. I blame Pen15, Hulu‘s new series about a pair of 13-year-old BFFs set in 2000. It made me realize that pop culture in the aughts gave me everything I needed to survive as a preteen: chat rooms, Beyoncé’s solo career, and the foundation of all my feminist creeds.

As a tomboyish, hyperactive, athletic kid, I spent most of my time playing sports, watching movies about sports, and obsessing over the female stars of sports movies in a way that I would later come to understand as “being gay.” The timing was perfect—films about female athletes were booming in the 2000s. Movies like Bend It Like Beckham, Stick It, and She’s the Man were my lifeblood growing up because I identified so much with the young women in them. They were often facing discrimination just for being themselves, or were feeling othered. I loved that they were funny, sporty, a little gay (at least aesthetically), and uhh…hot. They were my Sporty Spice heroes. But somewhere along the way, we lost touch with our inner-Mia Hamms. Movies like Blue Crush fell to the wayside, and we stopped sliming female athletes at the Kids Choice Awards. Society still stans top female athletes—hello, Serena Williams—but most of pop culture has dropped their narratives.

So when I saw Fighting With My Family, the new female wrestling comedy from Stephen Merchant that’s in theaters now, I was galvanized. It’s eccentric, heartwarming, laugh-out-loud funny, and inspirational. It left me feeling utterly nostalgic for my adolescence. Laughing along was like muscle memory.

The best films in the subgenre of female sports movies either take a niche sport, like roller derby in Whip It, and invite us into an unexplored world, or shine a light on the hardships women face pursuing a career in a popular sport, like soccer in Bend It Like Beckham. Fighting With My Family accomplishes both. The movie, which was produced by former WWE star Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson himself, drops us into the lion’s den of professional wrestling and promises to make us overnight fans.

It follows the real-life story of WWE wrestler Paige (whose real name is Saraya-Jade Bevis; Paige is her wrestling name) and her journey to becoming the youngest Diva champion in history. Played by Florence Pugh, Paige comes from an outrageous, wrestling-obsessed family of criminals. Her eldest brother (James Burrows) is in prison. Her father (Nick Frost) was jailed numerous times for, in his own words, “mainly violence.” Her mom, played by a lip-ringed, grungy Lena Headey, was suicidal when she met Paige’s father but reminisces about the moment like a romantic comedy meet-cute. Paige comes from a pack of oddballs, and her combative family are the only ones that make her feel at home.

Sound familiar? The heartbeat of the 2000s sports comedy was quirky environments. In Whip It, Ellen Page’s character, Bliss, falls head-over-heels in love with her roller derby team, a flock of pugnacious, tattooed fuck-ups who make her feel safe while participating in a violent and niche sport. The same goes for Stick It and Bend It Like Beckham, in which our protagonists find love and safety among their very own pack of weirdos. But the girls aren’t weirdos—they’re like-minded people who found shelter in each other from a world that made them feel othered.

In Fighting With My Family, Paige is lucky to find this security in her actual family. But once she goes big league, auditioning for the WWE and actually getting signed as a professional wrestler, she feels alienated by the bright lights, hot bodies, and the seemingly insurmountable amount of pressure that comes with competing professionally. She’s homesick.

I Tried the Hanacure Mask, and Here’s What Happened

I’ve always taken more of a “double-tap only” approach to Instagram beauty. I’ll watch as bloggers do weird stuff to their face in the name of entertainment all day, but I’m intensely critical of what I’ll put on my own skin. (Rosacea, along with derm horror stories will do that to you.) So when the Hanacure mask starting popping up all over my feed—thanks mostly to a viral endorsement by Drew Barrymore and the fact that you look a thousand-years-old once it dries—I politely kept my distance.

But that was a few months ago, and still the hype wasn’t dying down, so—caving to the FOMO and the curiosity of what I’ll look like 40 birthdays from now—I added myself to a wait list and got KiraKira on standby. What’s the point of using this thing if you don’t Insta it, right?

Currently you can buy the Hanacure mask in two places: its website and Amazon. If you’re a binge-masker with some cash to spend, there’s a $110 kit minimally packaged and impossible to open (until you figure out, you’re an idiot, and it’s a flip top from the side) that includes four vials of serum, four peel-back gelling “solutions,” and very fancy brush to apply the mask with. Or, if you’re just mask-curious, there’s a $40 single-facial kit option.

The steps are easy enough to figure out using the guide inside, and prepping the face mask is fun in that geeky, playing-your-own chemist kind of way. You peel back the foil top of the solution, pour in the serum, and shake it all together to activate. Then it’s time to paint it on. I didn’t do a spot test because, sorry, I know better, but who actually does that? And then went straight to putting the cold, serum-y goop all around my chin, cheeks, and forehead—evenly, as the directions stated.

From there, you’ve got 30 minutes: optimal time to catch up on Riverdale, laugh at yourself in the mirror, and blast off a handful of Snapchats. The drying effects are almost instant, and by 10 minutes in, you’re wondering how the hell this stuff is actually supposed to make your skin look better. It tightens so much moving any sort of muscle on your face becomes near impossible—sort of how I imagine Botox would be: not painful, just odd and uncomfortable. By the 25-minute mark, my boyfriend, amused by my frozen, expressionless face, started showing me cat videos, and with each restrained smile a new line on the mask emerged. At this point I’ve sworn to be more diligent about my skin care routine (this look into the future ain’t great) and returning to KJ Apa’s abs can no longer distract me. This mask is tight AF, and not in the way your kid brother uses that phrase.

At 30 minutes, I was at the sink, using only water and circular motions to get all the remaining bits of wrinkled, dried-up gook off my face. As a disclaimer on the instructions warns pale people, the lifting compounds that stimulate blood flow to your face may leave you red, which is a slight understatement. Immediately after my face is angry. But trust the process. The ingredients do have reputable skin care workhorses: calming botanicals with anti-inflammatory properties, several peptides that brighten and minimize lines, and—my most needed component—moisturizing compounds responsible for delivering the promised afterglow, which actually arrived for me the next morning.

Upon waking, a glance in the mirror tells me this thing isn’t only pure spectacle. My jawline looks a little tighter, my cheeks a little dewier—it wasn’t exactly enough of a difference that someone else could tell looking at a before-and-after. But I know my face and how much I love salt, and this looked like I hadn’t touched a fry in days. (Joke’s on my ass.) There was still some residual redness, but if I can find something that solves that problem, rest assured you’ll know about it.

Best Brown Leather Boots, Jackets, and Handbags to Shop Now

I’ve never questioned my favorite black leather jacket. Not once. She (yes, my leather jacket is a she) has never let me down. Not on a single occasion. My leather jacket, and leather jackets in general, possess the same kind of je ne sais quoi that French girls have, the one that makes them effortlessly cool. A good black leather jacket is an essential, a classic, something most people really can’t live without for exactly that reason—it elevates any and every outfit. Part of the appeal isn’t just in the rock star connotations of a leather jacket but in the color. For the most part, they’re all black which means they are never not going to match. But I was surprised this past fashion month when I found myself wishing for a brown leather jacket instead.

I don’t own anything in brown leather and have honestly never given it any thought before. Then came NYFW, which also made me desperately want to replace all my florals with tie-dye and all my rounded boots with square toed ones. Brown leather was an obvious trend seen everywhere from the runway to the sidewalk. It felt nearly impossible to go a day without seeing someone wearing that Nanushka brown (vegan!) leather puffer jacket or a pair of brown leather trousers. On the runway Maryam Nassir Zadeh had a model wearing head to toe brown leather complete with brown leather thigh high boots, whereas at both Linder and at Jonathan Cohen, models wore incredible brown leather trench coats. The look felt fresh, like a more elegant (and literally sleek) take on 1970s suede. All the brown leather pieces from the runway and street style looked like what Penny Lane would wear if she were real and lived in 2019.

While I’m not going to necessarily retire my black leather jacket, I’m planning on stocking up on brown leather everything stat—not just jackets but brown leather bags, miniskirts, and maybe even bermuda shorts (Mango makes them look so good). So before you go ahead and buy another black leather jacket (although if you must, these 15 are on sale) maybe consider adding any of these 17 pieces to your wardrobe instead.

A Chronic Illness Is a Full-Time Job—And It’s Messing With My Mental Health

With a chronic illness, even something as simple as going on a date has an added layer of complexity. I could usually make it through a couple of dinners without anyone noticing that I was checking my blood sugar (not just my phone) under the table, but if things got hot and heavy, there inevitably came the moment when I’d have to fess up and explain that I may have to stop mid-romp to check my blood sugar.

When I was in my teens and 20s, I tried to pretend my diabetes was a peripheral part of my life—I wasn’t ready to own the fact that I had a permanent, chronic illness that could result in very real complications like kidney failure, eye disease, neuropathy, or heart disease if I didn’t maintain well-controlled blood sugars. Unless I was with close friends or family, I often hid my blood glucose testing and insulin delivery.

But downplaying it, of course, didn’t change the fact that I do have diabetes. What I couldn’t quite bring myself to admit until recently was that I felt an intense loneliness attached to my disease. I hated the idea that my condition could slow me down or spoil the fun. While other people my age were eating whatever they wanted and partying their faces off, I knew that for every drink I had or handful of fries I ate, it could mean I’d be on a blood sugar roller coaster for hours afterward.

Now that I’m in my 30s and actively planning for a future with my partner, I’ve been forced to look at the emotional toll my diabetes has taken on me—and I’ve realized I’m just beginning to understand another layer of my already complex disease.

The daily stress of maintaining healthy blood sugar levels might seem like a small thing to people who don’t experience it—even I tried to write it off as general “life” stuff for a long time, piling it alongside things all young adults deal with, like building a career, paying bills, and navigating relationships. But all the blood sugar math, and finger pricks, and stress over what’s on my plate, really add up. Going for a run, eating at restaurants, getting dressed, traveling, driving—heck, even having my period—all involve additional checklists to ensure my glucose is in control and I can be comfortable. Plus, managing diabetes is expensive. It’s a lot to keep track of.

I’ve been lucky so far to have not developed any serious physical complications, but it’s become clear in the past few years that a large part of my emotional turmoil—acute anxiety, worry about money and safety, fear of making mistakes—is, and always has been, directly related to my diabetes.

The research backs this up: having diabetes may add to your risk of depression, and can actually lead to a condition called diabetes distress, which is similar to depression in that it involves feeling out-of-control or powerless, but specifically related to diabetes. The irony is, it’s not always clear whether the diabetes fuels the depression or if it’s the other way around; high stress levels can elevate blood sugars, which can contribute to even more stress around keeping blood sugars in check. “When you’re asked to take on this extra work of managing your disease, burnout and having an emotional response is common,” says Dr. Polonsky. “It can be like a ball and chain, making it even harder to manage this disease successfully.”

That’s the thing about living with diabetes: No matter how “good” you are about checking your blood sugars and eating what you should to keep them in check, there are just some days—and sometimes long stretches—when you feel completely out of control. It’s easy to feel like a failure when you’re trying your best and it doesn’t pay off.

I recently realized that I can’t simultaneously improve my health and let fear run the show. Instead of downplaying the demands of my disease as I did in my teens and 20s, I’m now trying to examine and embrace them. That means asking questions and getting curious about the many ways in which my disease impacts my life and the lives of others. It means going back to therapy to specifically address the fear and anxiety I feel about my diabetes. And I’m trying to forgive myself for judging my worth based on the numbers I see on my glucose monitor.

The Notebook’s Ending Is Different on Netflix, and People Are Freaking Out

The Notebook is arguably one of the most iconic romance movies of all time. In fact, the Nicholas Sparks book-turned-film is so beloved, I wouldn’t be surprised if fans could recite it by heart.

That’s why what’s happening in England right now is so fascinating: Fans who have tried watching The Notebook on Netflix U.K. are noticing it includes a major change to the ending we all know and love.

There are spoilers ahead, so quit reading now if you haven’t watched the movie. Digital Spy reports fans aren’t happy with the Notebook ending Netflix U.K. has on its platform. The original ending, if you forget, takes place in a nursing home: The two main characters, Allie (Rachel McAdams) and Noah (Ryan Gosling), are now much older and die in a loving embrace. I’m tearing up just thinking about it.

But this isn’t what happens in Netflix U.K.’s version. Instead, the couple lies in bed together, but what happens next is unclear. According to Digital Spy, the scene pans to flying birds (???) before we see Allie and Noah pass away. One fan explained what happens on Twitter: “The alternate one just cuts off when Noah and Allie are holding hands in the bed and fades to black. I really can’t understand why. It’s weird.”

Several viewers are upset with this change. “I’m not big into romantic movies, but I have seen #TheNotebook and @Netflix, what you did wasn’t OK. That ending was beautiful. It’s all I can ever hope for in my marriage, so when I finally eat dirt I can go with the one I love. Don’t you dare take that away,” one person tweeted. Another fan agreed, writing “Its shocking. Give us back our gut-wrenching tears.”

Meanwhile, others are defending the switch. “They just cut out the bit where the nurse finds them. They still died in each other’s arms. It’s still implied,” one fan tweeted. Another viewer noted this version is actually true to the book, writing, “The alternate ending of The Notebook is more similar to that of the actual book, and there’s a sequel, so it’s definitely prepping us for the sequel.”

Netflix U.K. addressed the alternate ending on Twitter, writing, “Things you should know: We did not edit The Notebook. An alternate version exists and was supplied to us. We are getting to the bottom of it ASAP. Apparently some films have more than one ending?!”

It’s unclear which ending Netflix U.S. users will get when The Notebook becomes available March 1, but buy some extra tissues, just in case.

Glycolic Acid: Everything You Need to Know About It, Explained

No hyperbole: Glycolic acid changed my life. After years of alternating salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide, brushing off flakes caused by retinol, and piling on pounds of concealer to cover an errant breakout, I was finally able to walk outside without makeup and not feel self-conscious about my acne-prone skin. If I were to get into the lobbying game, I would sell my damn soul for glycolic acid. Were I to run for president (of whatever), my platform would be Glycolic Acid Deserves More Credit.

The major advantage of glycolic acid is that it does more than treat breakouts. The ingredient can also tackle hyperpigmentation, dullness, and signs of skin aging, like lines and wrinkles, without breaking a sweat. But don’t just take my word for it. Here’s a breakdown of the most common questions about glycolic acid and what exactly makes it such a great ingredient.

So…what exactly is glycolic acid?

Glycolic acid is a type of alpha-hydroxy acid (or AHA) that’s derived from sugar cane. It joins other acids you might recognize, such as lactic acid (which is derived from sour milk and was purportedly a favorite of Cleopatra), tartaric acid (which comes from grapes), and citric acid—which, you might guess, is derived from citrus fruits.

But it’s unique. “Of the AHAs, glycolic is the simplest in structure and the smallest, [meaning] it has the lowest molecular weight,” says Kenneth Howe, M.D., a dermatologist at Wexler Dermatology in New York City. That small molecular weight means it’s “easy for it to penetrate your skin and be super effective,” says Alix Shapiro, skin therapist at Heyday in NYC.

What does glycolic acid do for your skin?

First and foremost, glycolic acid is an exfoliant. It helps shed dead skin cells and reveal the newer, brighter layers underneath by acting on the stratum corneum (a.k.a. the outermost layer of skin). “Normal, intact stratum corneum consists of tightly packed layers of dead skin cells that are tightly bonded together,” says Dr. Howe. “Glycolic acid loosens these bonds.” With their glue dissolved by glycolic acid, those tough, rough layers of dead skin cells can more easily slough away.

But because glycolic acid is so small, it can get deeper into your skin, too, where it does some serious work. “Glycolic acid stimulates fibroblasts in the dermis to produce increased amounts of collagen,” says Dr. Howe. And by stimulating collagen production, it helps skin feel firmer and minimizes fine lines and wrinkles. Between the superficial action on your stratum corneum and the work it does below, “your skin will feel smoother and look more radiant and even-toned,” Shapiro says.

Great! How should I use glycolic acid in my routine?

As with any exfoliant, it’s best to start small if you have sensitive skin or are prone to irritation. For this, Shapiro recommends using it in a face wash. “A glycolic cleanser can get your skin used to it, rather than diving straight into a leave-on glycolic product if you are unsure if your skin can tolerate it,” she says. Try one that pairs it with hydrating ingredients, like Glow Recipe Blueberry Bounce Gentle Cleanser ($34), which includes hyaluronic acid.

If you know your skin is up for it, try it in a peel. “I feel glycolic acid is most effective when administered as a chemical peel done in a healthcare practitioner’s office,” says Dr. Howe. “The medical grade peel pads we use are stronger, with more potent effects, and many people get better results with stronger treatments done intermittently—once a month, say.” He also thinks patients do well with milder exfoliation more frequently, as with an at-home peel pad. I personally swear by BeautyRx Advanced 10% Exfoliating Pads ($70), while Dr. Dennis Gross Alpha Beta Universal Daily Peel ($88) has a cult following for a reason.

Will glycolic acid work for my skin type?

“It’s best for normal, combination, and oily skin types,” says Shapiro. But, as with anything, glycolic acid is not for everyone. “People with dry, highly sensitive skin often react to it with irritation,” says Dr. Howe. “Any form might irritate them, whether it’s in a topical product, a home-use peeling pad, or an office-based peel procedure.”

Priyanka Chopra Is Reportedly Mad at Meghan Markle, but I Call B.S.

It was only a matter of time before a story like this came out: Page Six is reporting Priyanka Chopra and Meghan Markle‘s friendship is “on the rocks.” The reason? Markle didn’t attend Chopra’s wedding to Nick Jonas in December. The Quantico actress is reportedly “crushed” by the Duchess of Sussex’s absence—so much so that she opted not to go to her royal baby shower last week in New York City. Never mind that Chopra had work obligations in Los Angeles keeping her from attending—this source is saying she skipped out to “get back” at Markle. Because that’s what grown people do.

“Their friendship is over unless Meghan apologizes,” a source tells Page Six. “Priyanka is a huge international star with a tremendous social media following. She is probably more famous worldwide than Meghan is. She feels Meghan didn’t respect her, and didn’t respect their friendship.”

I call bullshit on this entire story. Markle and Chopra are two of the most famous women in the world. Their work is hectic and takes them all around the globe. Markle probably had a very good, very legit reason for not attending Chopra’s wedding, and she no-doubt sent over a basket of homemade banana bread as an apology.

Likewise, Chopra’s reason for not being at Markle’s baby shower probably wasn’t malicious. TMZ reports she was bogged down with meetings for a book she’s writing, which sounds about right. Maybe she was combing through scripts to figure out her follow-up to Isn’t It Romantic. Maybe she was so wrapped up in newlywed bliss with Nick Jonas she forgot about Markle’s baby shower. I would believe that. Just look at this photo of them:

This is the kind of love that would make you miss your flight to New York.

And this is the kind of love that says, “I’m so sorry for missing your baby shower. I got distracted listening to my hot 26-year-old husband cover ‘Year 3000’ on the piano”:

Chopra will make it up to Markle by sending her a Rolls Royce or something. (She has one of those, and it’s about time the duchess has one too.)

If you want more proof this beef has no legs, a second source tells Page Six. “There are no issues between the two women. They are friends, and anything you’re being told otherwise is inaccurate and untrue.”

And that, my friends, is most likely the real story. Priyanka Chopra and Meghan Markle are too fancy and too iconic to be bothered with a silly feud—and, honestly, same.

Lady Gaga Is Finally Speaking Out About That Oscars Performance With Bradley Cooper

You know an Oscars performance for Best Song is note-worthy when we’re all still talking about it many days later. But, just in case you missed it, Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper gave an intimate performance of their hit song “Shallow” from A Star Is Born, and the Internet collectively lost its mind with rampant speculation about whether the two were more than just friends and co-stars. It was an incredible live moment filled with chemistry, yes, but the response was more than a little problematic.

Now, Lady Gaga is finally speaking out about the rumors of their supposed affair during an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live!.

“Social media, quite frankly, is the toilet of the Internet,” she told Jimmy Kimmel of the commentary, while offering up an eye roll to end all eye rolls. “And what it has done to pop culture is just, like, abysmal.” So far, we’re detecting no lies here.

“Yes, people saw love and guess what? That’s what we wanted you to see,” Gaga continued. She added that while she’s not usually one to relinquish control of her live performance vibe, she let Cooper direct the entire thing, down to the lighting. “[Shallow] is a love song, A Star Is Born is a love story,” she explained. “It was so important to both of us that we were connected the entire time…. When you’re singing love songs, that’s what you want people to feel.”

Gaga noted that she’s been doing lovey duets with her “arms wrapped around Tony Bennett” for years and hasn’t been confronted with the same rumors and innuendo. So, yeah, we can all just shut down those Gaga/Cooper ‘ship rumors right now. Mostly, she’s just really proud of her friend for getting up there and singing live in front of the world.

“My favorite thing about the whole experience was I was just so excited for people, not only at home, but our peers in the room to see him sing live and know that he sang every take live in this movie every single time,” she said. “I mean, all of it. There’s no lip synching.” And because Gaga is the best sport, she even reenacted that now-iconic head tilt with Kimmel.

Watch the full interview below.

Now that Lady Gaga has finally set the record straight, it’s probably time for us all to let the old ways (of conjuring a relationship between two costars) die.