Jennifer Aniston Threw a Christmas Party This Weekend—and Brad Pitt Attended

Jennifer Aniston threw a Christmas tree trimming party this past Saturday, December 14, and a very special guest attended: her ex-husband, Brad Pitt.

Now, before you jump to conclusions, it’s important to know a few things. 1) Pitt was just one of many A-listers who attended Aniston’s annual bash. Other celebs who went include Gwyneth Paltrow, Kate Hudson, and Jimmy Kimmel, according to People magazine. And 2) Aniston and Pitt have maintained a “friendly” relationship for a while now. Need we remind you that he attended her 50th birthday party back in February 2019?

“They have been in touch a few times since her birthday and are keeping it friendly,” a source tells People. Earlier they added, “The annual tree trimming party is always Jen’s favorite to host. She loves Christmas. As usual, a large group of friends attended.”

So, no, this doesn’t mean Aniston and Pitt are getting back together. Their relationship ended over a decade ago, after all. They’ve moved on and clearly have a very nice rapport with one another.

Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston in September 2001.

Getty Images

On Pitt going to Aniston’s birthday party in February, an insider told People, “He would not have been asked to come if that weren’t the case. It was a big night for Jen. The important people in her life gathered to celebrate with her. Brad fits into that group, and it was natural that he would want to come.” What the two of them have, per this source, is a “very civil relationship.”

Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston were married between 2000 and 2005. Shortly after their split, Pitt got together with Angelina Jolie, and a fictional, tabloid-fueled love triangle formed between the three of them. When Pitt and Jolie split in 2016, all eyes, unsurprisingly, were on Aniston. But it’s time this narrative that she’s still pining over Pitt end. She has more important things going on in her life. And so do we.

Elizabeth Warren Adds Kirsten Gillibrand and Kamala Harris’s Paid Leave and Reproductive Health Care Policies to Her Platform

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is blunt—the women have been pushed out.

In late August, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) exited the 2020 presidential race. Earlier this month, Senator Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) announced she would end her campaign too. Meanwhile, over a dozen candidates—most of whom are less well known than those two women—remain in the contest, with the field somewhat narrower and much, much more male than it was even 12 weeks ago. As some on social media have noted, there are now more billionaires up for the Democratic nomination than there are black women. And of the six candidates who qualified for this week’s Democratic debate, zero are people of color.

The problem is bigger than just who gets to stand behind a podium. With candidates like Gillibrand and Harris out of contention, their ideas risk elimination too. And Warren—who has put a feminist spin on retirement benefits and student debt—refuses to let that happen.

“We’ve seen a record number of women in this race,” Warren tells Glamour. “That means, together, we’ve been able to shape the national conversation, to highlight issues impacting people in America.” But, she adds, as men who can afford to pour tens of millions of dollars into their own runs declare their candidacies, that discussion suffers.

After Warren announced her bid, she unveiled her plan to make affordable childcare available to families nationwide. Gillibrand pioneered paid leave legislation. Harris prioritized reproductive healthcare. “These are powerful issues, not just for women, but for families,” Warren says. And of course, the fact that Gillibrand and Harris aren’t on the trail doesn’t mean we’ve solved them. So, Warren reached out to her former rivals and asked their permission—both to add their policies to her platform and to attribute those plans to the women responsible for them.

TV Shows That Ended in 2019—and Where to Watch Them Now

This post contains spoilers for your favorite shows. Consider yourself warned.

A handful of 2019’s best television shows took their final bow, leaving us with a gaping hole in our hearts and our schedules. Some series wrapped up in a way that can best be described as satisfying—so much so that we were pretty much OK with letting them go. Others, cough Game of Thrones cough , left us with more opinions and questions than some of us had in episode one. No matter how you felt about these endings, take a look back at the shows that ended in 2019—and where to revisit them once they’re gone.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

51 Winter Hairstyle Ideas Perfect for 2019

Is it just us, or has 2019 felt like the longest year ever? (Yes, Thank U, Next came out this year.) But now that winter is here, we’re ready to lean into the season and finish it off with a bang—give us the dark nails, the sparkly decorations, and most of all, the winter hairstyle ideas. With collaborations like Justine Marjan x Kitsch and the strong resurgence of headbands and hair clips, accessories are riding strong this season. That said, there’s always something about a classic updo or ponytail you really can’t go wrong with.

Whatever your taste or hair type, scroll on for the freshest, most interesting winter hairstyle ideas, pulled fresh and direct from the best of the Internet. Consider it our gift to you; sorry we didn’t wrap it.

Watching Mariah Carey on ‘Billy on the Street’ Is a Master Class in Christmas Joy

Mariah Carey celebrated Christmas and Hanukkah on a holiday segment of Billy on the Street with Billy Eichner. She hugged strangers, conversed in Swedish, and performed a minor DIY crafting project.

The video, released online on December 16, is six blissful minutes of the legendary diva canvassing the streets of Manhattan, trying to be a good sport but looking like she’s getting her adult braces tightened. It’s 367 seconds of the queen of Christmas descending from her throne to connect with her subjects during the darkest days of the year. It’s butterflies and mistletoes and menorahs and a very funny look into the celebrity-industrial complex. Let’s go, Lambily, let’s go.

This year is the 25th anniversary of the Mariah Carey Christmas album, which includes the greatest Christmas song of the last 100 years, All I Want for Christmas Is You, which she says in the video she wrote in “fully, maybe an hour and a half.” The song’s power is not to be dismissed—after two and a half decades, it became a number one song literally during the writing of this article.

The 49-year-old—draped in crimson and trimmed in gold, hair like a butterscotch waterfall, contour casting a dramatic shadow like Santa himself leaping out of a fireplace—joined Eichner in his favorite activity: accosting people on the streets of New York City with questions and demands.

Most episodes of Billy on the Street, Eichner’s beloved game show, take place during daylight. Carey’s nighttime segment seems both more seasonally whimsical and also makes me wonder if she has a rider that says she won’t appear on camera in direct sunlight. Hopefully, they gave her whatever she wanted—it’s clear that a master is at work here. In the course of the short video she: sings “I Have a Little Dreidel” from memory, speaks Swedish, then appropriately acknowledges that she is showing off, kindly validates a man who says he was both naughty and nice this year, shakes hands with a puppy, and participates in a group hug.

It is written all over Carey’s face that she longs to be stretched out before a roaring fire in a remote chalet, drinking Veuve as a manservant drops by with a velvet-lined hutch filled with baby bunnies for her amusement. Her gameness to participate in this activity, which seems to represent everything I imagine she loathes (lack of creative control, unfettered contact with random people, etc.) feels loving. This woman who has already given us so much—she’s the female singer with the greatest number of Billboard 100 number one hits in history, as Billy points out—is still willing to totter around carrying a heart-eyes emoji Christmas ornament, trying to get strangers to kiss.

Carey’s voice sounds like sparkles and the taste of eggnog, her songs jolt the heart, and her presence as an improviser is deliciously uncomfortable. Like most of the Billy on the Street videos, her on-the-street segment gently reminds us that, like politicians, celebrities need us more than we need them. Part of Eichner’s genius is to expose the mechanisms of that relationship without being mean, and with Carey, who’s so beloved yet typically aloof, he is especially successful. Fans and celebrities are a weird, symbiotic family of entertainers and the entertained, passing each other on dark streets, trying to have moments of joy. And also, in Carey’s case, to establish appropriate boundaries. And may it be so, for us all. ’Tis the season to have balance.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

Watching Mariah Carey on Billy on the Street Is a Masterclass in Christmas Joy

Mariah Carey celebrated Christmas and Hanukkah on a holiday segment of Billy on the Street with Billy Eichner. She hugged strangers, conversed in Swedish, and performed a minor DIY crafting project.

The video, released online on December 16, is six blissful minutes of the legendary diva canvassing the streets of Manhattan, trying to be a good sport but looking like she’s getting her adult braces tightened. It’s 367 seconds of the Queen of Christmas descending from her throne to connect with her subjects during the darkest days of the year. It’s butterflies and mistletoes and menorahs and a very funny look into the celebrity-industrial complex. Let’s go Lambily, let’s go.

This year is the 25th anniversary of the Mariah Carey Christmas album, which includes the greatest Christmas song of the last 100 years, All I Want for Christmas Is You, which she says in the video she wrote in “fully, maybe an hour and a half.” The song’s power is not to be dismissed–after two and a half decades, it became a number one song literally during the writing of this article.

The 49-year-old—draped in crimson and trimmed in gold, hair like a butterscotch waterfall, contour casting a dramatic shadow like Santa himself leaping out of a fireplace—joined Eichner in his favorite activity: accosting people on the streets of New York with questions and demands.

Most episodes of Billy on the Street, Eichner’s beloved gameshow, take place during daylight. Mariah’s nighttime segment seems both more seasonally whimsical and also makes me wonder if she has a rider that says she won’t appear on camera in direct sunlight. Hopefully they gave her whatever she wanted—it’s clear that a master is at work here. In the course of the short video she: sings “I Have A Little Dreidel” from memory, speaks Swedish then appropriately acknowledges that she is showing off, kindly validates a man who says he was both naughty and nice this year, shakes hands with a puppy, and participates in a group hug.

It is written all over Mariah Carey’s face that she longs to be stretched out before a roaring fire in a remote chalet, drinking Veuve as a manservant drops by with a velvet-lined hutch filled with baby bunnies for her amusement. Her gameness to participate in this activity, which seems to represent everything I imagine she loathes (lack of creative control, unfettered contact with random people, etc) feels loving. This woman who has already given us so much—she’s the female singer with the greatest number of Billboard 100 number-one hits in history, as Billy points out—is still willing to totter around carrying a heart-eyes emoji Christmas ornament, trying to get strangers to kiss.

Mariah Carey’s voice sounds like sparkles and the taste of eggnog, her songs jolt the heart, and her presence as an improviser is deliciously uncomfortable. Like most of the Billy on the Street videos, her on-the-street segment gently reminds us that, like politicians, celebrities need us more than we need them. Part of Billy Eichner’s genius is to expose the mechanisms of that relationship without being mean, and with Mariah, who’s so beloved yet typically aloof, he is especially successful. Fans and celebrities are a weird, symbiotic family of entertainers and the entertained, passing each other on dark streets, trying to have moments of joy. And also, in Mariah’s case, to establish appropriate boundaries. And may it be so, for us all. ‘Tis the season to have balance.

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour.

Tiffani Thiessen Talks About Her Iconic Characters and Working with Woody Allen

In March 2016 at 8:31 p.m. I tweeted the following: “I really really wish I were friends with Tiffani Thiessen.” I have no idea what made me put that out into the world at that very moment, but I can tell you it’s totally true. I feel like there are few people on TV I can truly say I’ve grown up watching and still care about, and Tifffani’s one of them. I’ve always just gotten a good vibe from her and was curious to talk about what it’s like playing two iconic roles—Kelly Kapowski on Saved by the Bell and Valerie Malone on Beverly Hills, 90210. was also excited to hear about her new role on the charming Netflix show Alexa & Katie.

Before our chat, we spoke on the phone to go over what outfit she’d be talking about and I was surprised by her pick. Tiffani wanted to talk about what she wore to a red carpet premiere that she described as a fairytale—it was for her first big movie, Hollywood Ending, and she was handpicked to be in the film by Woody Allen. This gave me pause—the filmmaker has been accused by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow of sexual abuse, which Allen has denied.

Tiffani was dressed by Giorgio Armani himself for her first Cannes film festival to promote 2002’s Hollywood Ending.

J. Vespa

Since the accusation, several stars have vowed not to work with him. For Tiffani Thiessen, though, the moment in question was more about going from being a TV star in teen shows to having a legitimate movie star moment—listen to her describe walking the iconic red Cannes stairs—and being dressed by one of the most well-known designers in the world, Georgio Armani to promote Hollywood Ending in France and in New York.

Also in Armani for the New York premiere of Hollywood Ending in 2002.

Ron Galella

We also talked about what Tiffani bought herself when she realized she was actually making some real money (she admitted she was at the Gucci store a lot in the ’90s), how her style has changed after becoming a mom to two kids, what it was like going through puberty on national television, Valerie Malone’s combat boots, and how we have her to thank for that weird ’90s trend in which we left our top jeans button undone.

Here’s the episode!

Follow host Perrie Samotin on Instagram @perriesamotin, guest Tiffani Thiessen at @tiffanithiessen, and subscribe to What I Wore When on Apple Podcasts or where ever you listen to your favorite shows.

The Best Gifts for Runners, All Approved By Someone Who’s Run All the Miles

The best gifts for runners probably aren’t as obvious as you think. Running shoes come to mind, for example, but unless you know the exact brand, style, and size your runner prefers, you’re going to strike out. (Many runners are more loyal to their running shoes than they are to their families.) You should also steer clear of the mysterious running gadgets that are tempting you from the racks by the register. Instead, consider the actual best gifts for runners below, which all have been vetted and tested by a longtime runner. (Me.)

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

A Sober Holiday Season Doesn’t Have to Be Boring

Then came a real test: a season soaked with social stress and opportunities to take the edge off with a mug of mulled wine. “I felt like something was missing without drinking and I had a lot of despair, thinking it would always be that way,” McKowen says.

As hard as it was, the experience of having a sober holiday season was still hugely empowering for McKowen—as it was for me. When I woke up the next morning having survived my first sober Christmas Day for more than 20 years, I felt an overwhelming sense of pride, as well as an even stronger belief in my choice. “I realized how much I’d been missing and how alcohol made an already tricky season even more so,” McKowen says. “By the time my second sober holiday season came around, it was a totally different experience. I love the holidays now. They are a lot simpler and focused on the things we want the holidays to be about: gratitude, reflection, community.”

If you’re sober this season, or simply looking to be more mindful of your drinking, here’s some advice from those of us who have been there.

1. Remind yourself why you’re choosing not to drink.

Warrington recommends having a really clear idea of the reasons you’re choosing not to drink. You might be fed up with hangovers, want to save money, or have a fitness goal you’re striving for. “Focus on what you’re creating space for in your life by cutting out booze,” she says. “I always say, the only thing you’re missing out on by not drinking is getting drunk”

2. Keep an open mind.

If, like Warrington, your first sober holiday season is motivated by curiosity—What would happen if I didn’t end up doing a drunken rendition of “Santa Baby” this year?— her advice is to keep an open mind. “Assume you’re going to have fun,” she says. “For me, sober parties were more strange than anything, as I was so used to having a drink in my hand it felt odd not to, but I soon got used to it and enjoyed the freedom of being able to leave whenever I wanted.”

3. Know when to sit out.

If the whole idea of being sober at a party is just one step too far, that’s absolutely fine. “You don’t have to go to the party. Really. You don’t,” McKowen says. “So many of the parties, dinners, and obligations we commit to are optional. It doesn’t occur to us that we can simply back out and take the pressure off.”

4. Plan ahead.

When it comes to the social events you do want to go to it really helps to plan ahead. McKowen recommends having someone to check in with before, during and after the event, both to keep you accountable to sobriety and help emotionally.

Harvey Weinstein Claims He’s a ‘Forgotten Man’ in New Interview

Harvey Weinstein is still in the middle of criminal proceedings on sexual assault charges, is soon due back in court, and has reached a tentative $25 million settlement with some of his accusers (which insurance will cover), but he still thinks he’s a victim in this situation.

The disgraced former movie mogul whom dozens of women have accused of sexual misconduct seems to be looking for sympathy in a new interview with the New York Post. Oh, and he would also like credit for all the work he did for women.

“I feel like the forgotten man,” he said. “I made more movies directed by women and about women than any filmmaker, and I’m talking about 30 years ago. I’m not talking about now when it’s vogue. I did it first! I pioneered it! It all got eviscerated because of what happened,” Weinstein said. “My work has been forgotten.”

Never mind that “what happened” was a whole lot of alleged abuse.

“I want this city to recognize who I was instead of what I’ve become,” he continued. Weinstein used a few examples from his past to try to make his point. “Gwyneth Paltrow in 2003 got $10 million to make a movie called View from the Top,” he said. “She was the highest-paid female actor in an independent film. Higher-paid than all the men.” He also cited “social issues” taken on in movies from his companies, Miramax and The Weinstein Company. “I understood the celebratory nature of the film [Paris Is Burning] and bought the distribution rights,” he said. “The same thing is true for Transamerica [for] which Felicity Huffman got an Academy Award.” (Huffman was nominated for an Oscar for her role in 2006, but did not win.)

In response to Weinstein’s interview, 23 women—including Judd, McGowan, and Rosanna Arquette—released the following statement to USA Today.

“Harvey Weinstein is trying to gaslight society again. He says in a new interview he doesn’t want to be forgotten. Well, he won’t be. He will be remembered as a sexual predator and an unrepentant abuser who took everything and deserves nothing,” The Silence Breakers said. “He will be remembered by the collective will of countless women who stood up and said enough. We refuse to let this predator rewrite his legacy of abuse.”