LGBTQ+ People on the Power of Watching ‘The L Word’ for the First Time

Katherine Moennig and Sarah Shahi in season three. ©Showtime Networks Inc./Courtesy Everett Collection

Caitlin Copple Masingill, 36, Boise, founder and president, Full Swing PR

The L Word was huge in my own coming-out process. I binge-watched the series in my apartment in Sun Valley, Idaho, where I worked as a cocktail waitress for a year. I watched it with my best friend, Amy, who was straight but very supportive of my coming out-process. Having also grown up in rural Idaho, she was pretty intrigued by the L.A. lesbian subculture of the day. I couldn’t find any lesbians to date in Idaho, so it was a rough year, but watching The L Word gave me hope that I’d find someone eventually and be able to explore my true sexual orientation. Sure enough, when I moved to Montana for graduate school, Missoula proved to be full of lesbians, and watch parties of The L Word ensued. I met my first girlfriend shortly after I moved there. I dated women pretty much exclusively for a decade but ended up getting back together with my uber-supportive college sweetheart, a dude named Jeff. I prefer to identify as queer and not bisexual. I feel like I’m 80% gay and 20% bi, and Jeff happens to fall in the 20%. We’ve been married since June 2017 and have a three-year-old, and we live in Boise. I was the first openly LGBTQ person elected to the Missoula City Council in 2011, when I was 27.”

Kenny Screve, 24, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, LGBT+ advocate and social media influencer

“The first time I watched The L Word, I had recently came out of the closet. During that time, I was extremely afraid of not being accepted. Then I found the The L Word. I was extremely happy to watch something that supported the LGBT+ community. I thought it was so surreal and necessary. I enjoyed every minute of The L Word and really thought the world needed to see couples that aren’t heterosexual. The characters on the show were amazing and did a really good job showcasing what it’s like to be a lesbian. Meaning, their relationships aren’t much different from your typical heterosexual relationship. The show reminded me of Sex and the City, lesbian edition. The L Word also shows the struggle LGBT+ people have to go through on the daily. It really depicts the lives of some of my lesbian friends. I loved Tina and Bette as a couple. Ultimately, I just think it’s important for society to play shows like this because it gives us LGBT+ folk something to relate to. It can be really annoying to watch a show that you can’t relate to whatsoever. I watched it in my dorm room alone and sometimes with a group of friends. But mostly alone. When I’m really into a show, I don’t like to get distracted from all the tea, but I enjoy conversations with my friends about it. As a gay man, I totally related to some of the struggles faced by some of the L Word characters. Representation is super important. For society to move forward, it’s necessary.”

Mara Wilson, 32, Los Angeles, actor and writer

“As a teen, I was deeply closeted and thus conflicted about openly enjoying anything even rumored to be about women loving women. It was years before I admitted my love for the Spice Girls, let alone the Indigo Girls. Lesbians in pop culture were either the object of a joke or an object of male fantasy. So it was a relief when friends of mine started passing around DVDs of The L Word at boarding school. Yes, it was sensationalist and very of its time, but it was one of the first shows I saw that showed queer women as people. I remember being happy when I took a personality quiz and got Bette, and annoyed when I took another one and got Jenny. It was the first time I felt that I could identify fully with fictional queer women, maybe because all my friends, regardless of orientation, were doing it too.

”I definitely still had a long way to go, though: A few years later I saw a play in New York with my then boyfriend and said ‘Oh, my God!’ when I saw Kate Moenning’s name in the playbill. My boyfriend said, ‘What do you know that actress from?’ I said, ‘Oh, just from…stuff.’”

Melissa Kravitz is a writer based in New York City. Follow her at @melissabethk on both Instagram and Twitter.

Amal Clooney Style: Look Pulled Together, No Matter Where You’re Headed

Just like Pantone picks a color palette to set the mood for the year ahead, I pick a fashion muse. For the new decade I’m saying goodbye to floral prints, muted shades, and billowing dress silhouettes—you’re all canceled, just as swiftly as Woodstock 50—and hello to Amal Clooney Style. (Yes, with a capital S.) “Is Amal Clooney Style a thing?” I can hear you asking. Of course it is. It’s fashionable, but never a slave to fashion, and it almost always includes pointy-toed pumps. It says, “I mean business” and “I keep a tailor on retainer” and “Yes, my husband was named Sexiest Man Alive twice, but we all know who the real catch is here.” It’s also very aware of the occasion. At the office, Amal Clooney Style is a solid-color dress that’s knee-length or a little longer, on the weekend though—if you’re actually Amal Clooney, that often means “on the red carpet”—it can be a little bit unexpected.

Ready for a primer in Amal Clooney Style? Let’s recap her best looks from 2019.

The Duchess of Sussex’s New York baby shower, hosted by close friend Serena Williams, was held in February the penthouse suite at The Mark, a swanky uptown hotel, which reportedly costs $75,000 per night. Which is all to say, Amal Clooney knew she’d be photographed and among well-dressed company. She selected a slim-fitting strapless jumpsuit with a same-color belt that brings us to rule No. 1 of Amal Clooney Style: Accentuate your natural waist. (You won’t see a sack dress in the next dozen photos.) Gold hoops and matching pumps are understated but equally festive.

Gotham

The Prince’s Trust

A month later, Amal and her mister attended a dinner hosted by Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace. George Clooney’s classic tux (and, um Buckingham Palace) indicates that the event was black tie, which means it was the perfect occasion for a floor-length strapless gown paired with a one-shoulder cape with a cascading train. The look perfectly demonstrates Amal Clooney Style rule No. 2: If you’re wearing solid black or white, make sure there’s something visually interesting about the silhouette, texture, or details.

Best Belts to Wear This Winter and How to Style Them

Phillip Faraone

As part of a very 2019 monochromatic outfit, a bedazzled, ’00s-inspired statement belt has worked its way back in our favor. Between appointments, a bold jacket frames the outfit (and the belt) perfectly.

Edward Berthelot

When the February closet doldrums set in, the corset belt you bought last spring plus fall’s boiler suit equals a whole new look.

Hanna Lassen

It’s all in the details: Every element of Olivia Palermo’s look adds a layer of flair, including a belt she could have picked up yesterday in Soho or swiped from her grandmother’s closet. (The best belts to invest in are those you’ll wear absolutely forever.)

Matthew Sperzel

For a fresh take on a classic skirt suit, look for one with a belted slim-cut double-breasted blazer. (Or style a belt over a blazer you already own.) An array of necklaces—from the delicate beads you bought at a beach surf shop to a “borrowed this from Kanye”–thick chain—make the timeless outfit look totally modern.

Edward Berthelot

If you can’t decide which style you love most, don’t forget to keep your search broad: Sometimes the best belts are hiding in the men’s department. Also consider a belt bag, which gives you the outfit update and lets you go hands-free.

Beyoncé: Giving Zero Effs Is ‘the Most Liberating Place to Be’

Beyoncé is one of the world’s most private celebrities. Case in point: She rarely gives interviews anymore. Instead, she chooses to express herself through her projects, from emotional albums like Lemonade and her Netflix documentary, Homecoming. Hell, even her Instagram posts are often without captions.

But recently she talked to Elle (via fan-sourced questions) about topics as varied as her latest Ivy Park collection, her work process, motherhood, and body image. One highlight of the Q&A comes when a fan asked Queen Bey how she feels about unnecessary scrutiny around her body. “Everybody’s weight fluctuates,” the fan wrote. “How does it make you feel when people are constantly commenting on your appearance?”

Beyoncé’s reply: “If someone told me 15 years ago that my body would go through so many changes and fluctuations, and that I would feel more womanly and secure with my curves, I would not have believed them. But children and maturity have taught me to value myself beyond my physical appearance and really understand that I am more than enough no matter what stage I’m at in life.”

She continued, “Giving zero 🤬s is the most liberating place to be. Also knowing true beauty is something you cannot see. I wish more people focused on discovering the beauty within themselves rather than critiquing other folks’ grills.”

Amen to that.

But Beyoncé also admitted that negative comments can get to her sometimes. “Yes, I’m human,” she said. “In moments of vulnerability, I try to remind myself I’m strong and I’m built for this. Thank God most of the noise bounces off of me after all of these years.”

We also learned her karaoke go-to songs are “Escape (The Piña Colada Song)” and “Hotel California”. She doesn’t know her Snapchat handle, but she is aware of Keke Palmer’s “I’m sorry to that man” meme because she answered, “Sorry to that Snapchat. 🤪🤫🤐.” And her least favorite question to be asked is actually relatable to a lot of women: “Are you pregnant? Get off my ovaries!”

The queen has spoken.

With Miss Universe’s Win, Black Women Hold Every Major Pageant Title in the World Right Now

Pageants often get a bad rap for being regressive leftovers from a different time. While some of that criticism is fair, the organizations that run them have made changes in recent years to become more modern. (Case and point: the elimination of the swimsuit competition at Miss America.) And there’s no question that their reach is still enormous, with competitions running in all 50 states and in countries around the world.

Now, for the first time ever, all four major pageant titles—Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe—are held by black women. Last night, the newly-crowned Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa, joined Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst, and Miss Teen USA Kaliegh Garris to become the fourth black woman to currently wear a major pageant crown.

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me, with my kind of skin and my kind of hair, was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said, according to the BBC. “I think that it is time that that stops today.”

“It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African-American women that are doing so much great work,” Ms. Franklin told the New York Times in May. “People will argue that race doesn’t matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery.”

“Nia, Cheslie, and Kaliegh: you are trailblazers, creating your own path on your own terms. Congratulations,” Senator Kamala Harris tweeted in May. Now, Tunzi joins the group (defeating Kryst).

None of the women are the first black woman to wear their particular crown. Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America in 1984; Carole Gist won Miss USA in 1990; Janel Bishop won Miss Teen USA in 1991; and Janelle Commissiong was crowned Miss Universe in 1977. But on social media, enthusiasm for this particular clean sweep was undeniable.

Even Oprah weighed in, tweeting, “Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you…leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls 🇿🇦🇿🇦🇿🇦.”

The significance of all four women wearing the crowns at the same time was also a much-discussed topic.

This is yet another example of how much representation matters—in the world of pageants and beyond.

With Miss Universe’s Win, Black Women Notch Another Major Pageant Title—And Worldwide Representation

Pageants often get a bad rap for being regressive leftovers from a different time. While some of that criticism is fair, the organizations that run them have made changes in recent years to become more modern. (Case and point: the elimination of the swimsuit competition at Miss America.) And there’s no question that their reach is still enormous, with competitions running in all 50 states and in countries around the world.

Now, for the first time ever, the titles for Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe are held by black women. Last night, the newly crowned Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa, joined Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst, and Miss Teen USA Kaliegh Garris.

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me, with my kind of skin and my kind of hair, was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said, according to the BBC. “I think that it is time that that stops today.”

“It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African American women that are doing so much great work,” Ms. Franklin told the New York Times in May. “People will argue that race doesn’t matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery.”

“Nia, Cheslie, and Kaliegh: you are trailblazers, creating your own path on your own terms. Congratulations,” Senator Kamala Harris tweeted in May. Now, Tunzi joins the group (defeating Kryst).

None of the women is the first black woman to wear their particular crown. Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America in 1984; Carole Gist won Miss USA in 1990; Janel Bishop won Miss Teen USA in 1991; and Janelle Commissiong was crowned Miss Universe in 1977. But on social media, enthusiasm for this particular clean sweep was undeniable.

Even Oprah weighed in, tweeting, “Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you…leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls 🇿🇦🇿🇦🇿🇦.”

The significance of all four women wearing the crowns at the same time was also a much-discussed topic.

This is yet another example of how much representation matters—in the world of pageants and beyond.

For the First Time, Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Now Miss Universe Are All Black Women

Pageants often get a bad rap for being regressive leftovers from a different time. While some of that criticism is fair, the organizations that run them have made changes in recent years to become more modern. (Case and point: the elimination of the swimsuit competition at Miss America.) And there’s no question that their reach is still enormous, with competitions running in all 50 states and in countries around the world.

Now, for the first time ever, the titles for Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe are held by black women. Last night, the newly crowned Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa, joined Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst, and Miss Teen USA Kaliegh Garris.

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me, with my kind of skin and my kind of hair, was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said, according to the BBC. “I think that it is time that that stops today.”

“It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African American women that are doing so much great work,” Ms. Franklin told the New York Times in May. “People will argue that race doesn’t matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery.”

“Nia, Cheslie, and Kaliegh: you are trailblazers, creating your own path on your own terms. Congratulations,” Senator Kamala Harris tweeted in May. Now, Tunzi joins the group (defeating Kryst).

None of the women is the first black woman to wear their particular crown. Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America in 1984; Carole Gist won Miss USA in 1990; Janel Bishop won Miss Teen USA in 1991; and Janelle Commissiong was crowned Miss Universe in 1977. But on social media, enthusiasm for this particular clean sweep was undeniable.

Even Oprah weighed in, tweeting, “Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you…leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls 🇿🇦🇿🇦🇿🇦.”

The significance of all four women wearing the crowns at the same time was also a much-discussed topic.

This is yet another example of how much representation matters—in the world of pageants and beyond.

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Season Three, Episode Five Recap: How That Pool Scene Between Rachel Brosnahan and Alex Borstein Was Really Filmed

Amazon Prime

“Miami was a little cursed,” Brosnahan says, with a laugh. “It was just so hot. Heat records were being broken while we were there, and Alex was just melting in her leather jacket, wool pants, and boots by the pool. We had a very limited time to get a lot done, and the weather was not on our side. There was either a monsoon or a million degrees and humid.”

Brosnahan says that while she was trying to keep cool between takes, paparazzi were lurking nearby to snap photos. “There are some really hilarious and awful photos in various states of heatstroke, where I’m fanning myself and look like I’m about to keel over,” she says. “There’s one funny one where I’m making a weird face while wearing a giant hat in a cape dress and fanning myself intensely. We actually got rained out of one of the pool days, so all of that pool stuff was consolidated into one day. It was a miracle we got it all finished in a day.”

It wasn’t just Brosnahan and Borstein who had to contend with the sky-high temps. The crew was also dealing with sunstroke, according to Borstein. “So many people went down out there. Florida’s rough, man,” she says. “I guess people retire there because they just stay indoors in their air-conditioned retirement home.”

Amazon Prime

Now that it’s been about six months since the scene was filmed, Borstein hopes she’ll be able to watch it eventually. “I don’t usually watch myself, but I’m sure one day I’ll watch it. I hear it’s really funny.”

It is. Take my word for it.

The third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is now streaming on Amazon Prime. Jessica Radloff is the Glamour West Coast editor. You can follow her on Instagram here.

53 Gift Ideas for Guys to Please Everyone on Your List

Gifting season is in full swing, and after you nail the perfect presents for your girlfriends, your mother-in-law—and, yes, yourself—you likely still have at least one guy left on your list. Thinking of gift ideas for guys is a whole different beast, and the last thing you want to do is clutter his space with typical “dude” stuff like a universal remote or a pack of golf balls. To bless the men in your life with pleasant surprises they’ll actually get use out of, read on for 53 thoughtful, functional, and stylish presents that will end the holiday season on the brightest note.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

2020 Golden Globes Nominations: See the full list here.

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Quentin Tarantino, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Noah Baumbach, Marriage Story

Anthony McCarten, The Two Popes

Bong Joon-ho and Han Jin-won, Parasite

Steven Zaillian, The Irishman

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

Thomas Newman, 1917

Hildur Guonadottir, Joker

Randy Newman, Marriage Story

Alexandre Desplat, Little Women

Daniel Pemberton, Motherless Brooklyn

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again,” Rocketman

“Spirit,” The Lion King

“Into the Unknown,” Frozen 2

“Stand Up,” Harriet

“Beautiful Ghosts,” Cats

Best Motion Picture, Animated

Frozen 2

Toy Story 4

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

Missing Link

The Lion King

Best Motion Picture, Foreign Language

The Farewell

Pain and Glory

Parasite

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Les Misérables

TELEVISION

Best Television Series, Drama

The Crown

The Morning Show

Succession

Big Little Lies

Killing Eve

Best Television Series, Musical, or Comedy

Barry

The Politician

Fleabag

The Kominsky Method

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Loudest Voice

Chernobyl

Unbelievable

Fosse/Verdon

Catch 22

Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series, Drama

Jennifer Aniston, The Morning Show

Olivia Colman, The Crown

Jodie Comer, Killing Eve

Nicole Kidman, Big Little Lies

Reese Witherspoon, The Morning Show

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Drama

Brian Cox, Succession

Tobias Menzies, The Crown

Billy Porter, Pose

Kit Harington, Game of Thrones

Rami Malek, Mr. Robot

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Musical, or Comedy

Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Kirsten Dunst, On Becoming a God in Central Florida

Christina Applegate, Dead to Me

Natasha Lyonne, Russian Doll

Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Fleabag