What Khloé Kardashian Just Said About Losing Weight Is Upsetting People

Khloé Kardashian has caught some heat in the past for her comments about weight. Last March, she published an article to her app about how to look “thin AF” in photos, which didn’t go over well with people. Then, a few months later, both she and Kendall Jenner faced backlash for raving about how “skinny” their sister Kim looked at an event. “She’s anorexic here,” Khloé said, referring to Kim’s waist, completely meaning it as a compliment. Oof.

Now social media users are taking Khloé to task for a recent post about losing weight. Earlier this week, the reality star wrote on Instagram Stories two things she thinks girls want: to “lose weight” and to “eat.”

Naturally, it didn’t take long for the criticism to pour in. The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil, who has spoken out repeatedly about the need to stop talking about weight in the media, took a screen shot of Khloé’s post and tweeted late Wednesday night, “This makes me sad.”

She later clarified that she wasn’t critiquing Khloé specifically but “the fat-shaming media” in general.

But Jamil wasn’t the only one upset by the problematic post. On Twitter, fed up users called out Khloé for sending a potentially toxic message to her millions of followers. “It’s actually really sad that so many girls follow Khloe and they’re all being told that it is normal for all of them to want to lose weight, rather than it being normal for all of them to be happy with their bodies,” one person wrote on Twitter. “Eating and losing weight are not mutually exclusive. Thinking they are is eating disorder behavior,” tweeted another.

Check out some more reactions to Khloé’s comment, below. (A few come to her defense.)

Khloé hasn’t responded to the backlash yet, but we’ll update this post when and if she does.

If you or someone you know is struggling with disordered eating, please call the NEDA helpline at 800-931-2237 or visit its website.

Related Stories:

Khloé Kardashian Gave Tips for Looking “Thin AF,” and I Kind of Expected More From Her

Kim Kardashian’s Sisters Praised Her for Looking “Skinny,” and People Aren’t Happy

Khloé Kardashian Producing a New Show About Killer Sisters Just Feels Right

What Khloé Kardashian Just Posted About Losing Weight Is Upsetting People

Khloé Kardashian has caught some heat in the past for her comments about weight. Last March, she published an article to her app about how to look “thin AF” in photos, which didn’t go over well with people. Then, a few months later, both she and Kendall Jenner faced backlash for raving about how “skinny” their sister Kim looked at an event. “She’s anorexic here,” Khloé said, referring to Kim’s waist, completely meaning it as a compliment. Oof.

Now social media users are taking Khloé to task for a recent post about losing weight. Earlier this week, the reality star posted a quote to Instagram Stories that said girls want two things: to “lose weight” and to “eat.”

Naturally, it didn’t take long for the criticism to pour in. The Good Place actress Jameela Jamil, who has spoken out repeatedly about the need to stop talking about weight in the media, took a screen shot of Khloé’s post and tweeted late Wednesday night, “This makes me sad.”

She later clarified that she wasn’t critiquing Khloé specifically but “the fat-shaming media” in general.

But Jamil wasn’t the only one upset by the problematic post. On Twitter, fed up users called out Khloé for sending a potentially toxic message to her millions of followers. “It’s actually really sad that so many girls follow Khloe and they’re all being told that it is normal for all of them to want to lose weight, rather than it being normal for all of them to be happy with their bodies,” one person wrote on Twitter. “Eating and losing weight are not mutually exclusive. Thinking they are is eating disorder behavior,” tweeted another.

Check out some more reactions to Khloé’s post, below. (A few come to her defense.)

Khloé hasn’t responded to the backlash yet, but we’ll update this post when and if she does.

If you or someone you know is struggling with disordered eating, please call the NEDA helpline at 800-931-2237 or visit its website.

Related Stories:

Khloé Kardashian Gave Tips for Looking “Thin AF,” and I Kind of Expected More From Her

Kim Kardashian’s Sisters Praised Her for Looking “Skinny,” and People Aren’t Happy

Khloé Kardashian Producing a New Show About Killer Sisters Just Feels Right

15 Travel Essentials That Make Traveling a Whole Lot Easier

A great trip—whether you’re escaping for a weekend or jetting off on a long-haul flight to an unexplored destination—is arguably one of the best parts of the year. However, it can also be a bit of a hassle: We’ve all dealt with suitcases that break on day three of a week-long trip, freezing cold flights in recycled air, or hotels where the walls are just that much too thin to get a good night’s sleep. As a travel writer living in Berlin, I’m usually off somewhere—and because of such, I’m usually the friend everyone comes to for reccs on how to make traveling easier. My secret? I couldn’t live between flights without a lounge pass I snag from LoungeBuddy: An indulgent-but-not-obscene spend (between $30-40 in most cases) yields a restorative shower, a hot, not-fast-food meal (and, often, a free glass or two of wine)—and, most importantly, the sanity that comes from not having to set up camp and search for WiFi and outlets between flights in crowded airport terminals.

For our series “To Me, From Me,” I posed the same question to women who travel almost constantly for work. What’s the one thing they swear by—and aren’t afraid to splash out on—that makes their on-the-go lifestyles a little smoother and a heck of a lot less stressful? Read on for their picks, from a $48 restorative overnight facial you can fall asleep in (hello, jet lag) to a $550 carryon that holds up trip after trip (after trip).

16 Travel Essentials That Make Traveling a Whole Lot Easier

A great trip—whether you’re escaping for a weekend or jetting off on a long-haul flight to an unexplored destination—is arguably one of the best parts of the year. However, it can also be a bit of a hassle: We’ve all dealt with suitcases that break on day three of a weeklong trip, freezing-cold flights in recycled air, or hotels where the walls are just that much too thin to get a good night’s sleep. As a travel writer based in Berlin, I’m usually heading off somewhere—and because of my work, I’m usually the friend everyone comes to for recs on how to make traveling easier. My secret? I couldn’t live between long-haul flights without a lounge pass I snag from LoungeBuddy: An indulgent but not obscene spend (between $30 and $50 in most cases) yields a restorative shower, a hot, not-fast-food meal (and, often, a free glass or two of wine)—and, most importantly, the sanity that comes from not having to set up camp and search for Wi-Fi and outlets in crowded airport terminals.

For our series To Me, From Me, I posed the same question to women who travel almost constantly for work. What’s the one thing they swear by—and aren’t afraid to splash out on—that makes their on-the-go lifestyles a little smoother and a heck of a lot less stressful? Read on for their picks, from a $48 restorative overnight facial you can fall asleep in (see ya, jet lag) to a $550 carry-on that holds up trip after trip (after trip).

The Best Australian Beauty Brands You Need to Know

Can an entire continent be trending? Because if so, Australia is having a moment. An influx of Australian beauty brands, appropriately nicknamed A-Beauty, have taken a long layover-filled flight, landed in the United States, and made their way into carefully curated beauty routines. Stateside Sephora locations recently started carrying Aussie-born brands like Dr. Roebuck’s and Go-To Skincare, while the Instagram hashtag #sandandsky has been wrested from nature photographers and is now populated by beauty influencers testing out Sand & Sky Pink Australian Clay.

Australian beauty is all about effortlessness, joy, and a celebration of the country’s unique flora and fauna. (Fun fact: More than 80 percent of Australia’s flowering plants are found nowhere else in the world.) Beauty company founders looked right in their backyards for efficacious botanicals, healing clays, and natural substitutes for harsh chemicals. Many of our favorite A-Beauty brands are all-natural and cruelty-free. Plus, much like a Down Under sunset, A-beauty packaging is often simple and colorful. As a whole, it’s a beauty experience that’s uniquely uplifting.

“The unique element of Australian beauty is driven by our culture and its people,” says Kim Devin, co-founder of Dr Roebuck’s. “Nature and wellness is at the very center of our living and being, so it’s only natural that we treat our skincare routines in the same manner. Australia is rich in nutrients, resources and powerful, indigenous ingredients, so A-Beauty really brings the power and efficacy of Aussie elements to life.”

For Devin, the A-beauty standard is “clean, natural, ‘no-fuss’ skincare.” Since the culture takes pride in healthy lifestyle choices, Aussie beauty focuses on the “glowing from within” look—whether it’s the natural flush from a morning hike or a beauty fake-out concocted with sunless tanner and face oil. And that beach bum thing? “The messy, post-beach look is a very real trend here,” says Devin. “Overall, being healthy is synonymous with being beautiful.”

We think 2019 feels like the perfect time to inject a dose of Down Under positivity into your beauty routine. Keep scrolling for our 10 favorite beauty brands you need to know—the Earth, your skin, and your attitude will all thank you.

The Co-Founder of #MuteRKelly: Time’s Up on R. Kelly, But the Work’s Not Done Yet

Earlier this month Lifetime debuted Surviving R. Kelly, a six-part docuseries that explores the allegations of sexual assault and abuse that have surrounded the artist for decades. (He denies the accusations.) Until now the claims have had little impact on his career. But the response to the series has been enormous, with new attention on the women’s stories in the Time’s Up era. In Georgia a criminal probe has been opened to look into claims of sexual harassment and abuse. On social media, celebrities and collaborators have started to speak out. At a recent appearance protestors rallied outside. Here, the co-creator of the #MuteRKelly campaign reflects on what justice would look like and whether people are at last prepared to listen to black women and girls.


I was 14 when I heard that R. Kelly had married Aaliyah, who was his protégée. She was 15 at the time and it baffled me. I didn’t think of it as abuse. It was more, “What does a 15-year-old want with an old man?” R. Kelly was 27. To me, he was ancient. But I dismissed it. I was a kid, and I didn’t understand. I thought, “I guess this is what celebrities do.”

It just hit me then, “We’re dancing to these women’s pain.”

More rumors came up, and each time I didn’t think too much about it. I wasn’t OK with it, but I didn’t make a fuss about it either. Then [BuzzFeed] reported in 2017 that R. Kelly operated what some in the media around Georgia called “a sex cult.” After decades of accusations, it dawned on me that people knew full well what was going on, what was happening to black women, and we had made a collective decision not to take action. And I realized, I’m one of those people who is not standing stand with the victims. I had heard him on the radio. I had heard his music at barbecues, graduations, parties. It just hit me then, “We’re dancing to these women’s pain.”

Kenyette Barnes and I started #MuteRKelly in response to the news that this was happening in Georgia, where I live. I don’t know what I expected, but I wasn’t prepared for the response. We got so much hate mail. People were telling us we wanted to take a black man down, that we were believing these victims with no evidence, or that the women deserved what they said happened to them. It shocked me.

The petition that we circulated asked radio stations not to give him air time, and I figured it wouldn’t be a big deal. I thought, “OK, I’m going to send this petition to the radio stations, and it’ll be like, ‘Yep, he’s a horrible person. We’ve always known it. We’re going to stop playing him.'” That would be that. Two days of my life, and then this is taken care of for good. I was naive. It wasn’t like that at all. We were met with silence. Then we were met with ridicule.

There were a few bright spots, otherwise I’m not sure I could have kept at it. Women started to reaching out from all over, writing to us, “Oh my God, thank you so much for doing this. I’ve been doing my own personal protest against him forever.” Or, “I’ve been telling my friends that they shouldn’t support this man.” With #MuteRKelly, people started to feel like, “We have a banner to fly our flag under.”

Little by little, we have watched people come over. We’ve watched the tide turn, as people started to take a deeper look at these reports. The fact that the #MeToo movement and the Time’s Up movement exploded at the same time—that’s a factor. Because now the women who said, “I was a little uncomfortable with this, but I brushed it off” know that there’s a lot of us out there who aren’t going to be quiet.

#MeToo and Time’s Up and #MuteRKelly focus on different aspects of sexual abuse that we experience as women, but our goal is the same. We’re standing up and telling people, “We’re not going to accept this in our workplace. We’re not going to accept this from our entertainers. We’re not going to accept this in our lives and our homes. We’re not going to accept this behavior for our children. Wherever we find it, we’re going to root it out.” That’s the importance of this moment, and that’s the reason it’s so crucial that this conversation is back at the forefront of people’s minds. The difference here is that this alleged abuse affected black women and girls, a lot of them not from privileged backgrounds.

In black communities, I think when people heard about #MeToo, the reaction was, “Yes!” When we heard about Time’s Up, it was, “Yes!” When people heard about #MuteRKelly, it was like, “Hold on now…” His music is so rooted in our experience that we have an emotional connection to it—not so much to him, but to the music itself. When people hear “Step In The Name Of Love,” it brings up good memories. When they hear “I Believe I Can Fly,” they’re not thinking about Space Jam, they’re thinking about their baby’s graduation from kindergarten. It’s not OK, but I do think a lot of people didn’t want to let those good feelings go and face the reality that was behind them.

It’s hard to accept that sometimes, yes, someone is a terrible person. And our support has helped them this whole time.

So what’s changing now? Well, the docuseries Surviving R. Kelly premiered is forcing people who, until now, refused to accept these allegations start to think about who or what they want to protect. As black people, we have an inside voice and an outside voice. We’re cautious when it comes to criticizing other black people in the media. We feel and often attacked from all sides. People don’t want to contribute to that. Sometimes we can’t parse out when an attack is relevant and when it’s not—who we should support and who we shouldn’t. Part of the problem also is that as a culture in general we worship celebrities. We want to be like them. Eat what they eat. Wear what they wear. It’s hard to accept that sometimes, yes, someone is a terrible person. And our support has helped him this whole time.

Watching the show and seeing how deep the alleged abuse goes, seeing the whole timeline of it laid out, with so much corroborating evidence—from people who’ve worked for R. Kelly, from people who’ve collaborated with him, from people in the industry? It’s impossible to ignore this. It forces each of us to ask ourselves, “Why am I so invested in supporting this person who has never thought about supporting black women?”

We owe this to Dream Hampton, the executive producer of this series, and to all the women who’ve come forward and to all the legal teams that are helping these women attempt to get justice. Kenyette and I started #MuteRKelly and continued it even when we were disheartened, because we knew it could snowball and make a difference. We’re part of a nationwide movement now, but it has not been a short road. No one is getting rich off of this. No one is getting famous or making a fortune off of this. People won’t even tell their friends what their salaries are, and yet these women are on national television, telling their deepest, darkest secrets, showing us their worst pain. That deserves our respect. Now all we can hope is that action will be taken; this has been an emotional rollercoaster—for us since 2017, but for some of these women for decades.

Legal justice is important, and I’m glad to see that investigators in Georgia and Illinois want to look into this now. But for our movement, it has always been about the culture that supports a culture of abuse and breaking that culture down. If we can get R.Kelly off the radio, if he can’t book concerts, if his music is not on streaming services, that’s a success to us. That’s people telling him, “We will not support this. We will not support it from our entertainers, from our politicians, from our religious leaders, from our neighbors, from our friends.”

If nothing else happens, the fact that so many women decided to take a step forward, whether that means through the legal process or just to be open about this with their families and friends, with their children—I think that is a win that we’ve gained from this movement. The rest will just take continued effort. Time’s up, but the work’s not done yet.

Oronike Odeleye is the national co-founder of #MuteRKelly. Follow her on Twitter at @SuiteLadyOro.

The Cofounder of #MuteRKelly: Time’s Up on R. Kelly, but the Work’s Not Done Yet

Earlier this month Lifetime debuted Surviving R. Kelly, a six-part docuseries that explores the allegations of sexual assault and abuse that have surrounded the artist for decades. (He denies the accusations.) Until now the claims have had little impact on his career. But the response to the series has been enormous, with new attention on the women’s stories in the Time’s Up era. In Georgia a criminal probe has been opened to look into claims of sexual harassment and abuse. On social media, celebrities and collaborators have started to speak out. At a recent appearance protestors rallied outside. Here, the co-creator of the #MuteRKelly campaign reflects on what justice would look like and whether people are at last prepared to listen to black women and girls.


I was 14 when I heard that R. Kelly had married Aaliyah, who was his protégée. She was 15 at the time and it baffled me. I didn’t think of it as abuse. It was more, “What does a 15-year-old want with an old man?” R. Kelly was 27. To me, he was ancient. But I dismissed it. I was a kid, and I didn’t understand. I thought, “I guess this is what celebrities do.”

It just hit me then, “We’re dancing to these women’s pain.”

More rumors came up, and each time I didn’t think too much about it. I wasn’t OK with it, but I didn’t make a fuss about it either. Then [BuzzFeed] reported in 2017 that R. Kelly operated what some in the media around Georgia called “a sex cult.” After decades of accusations, it dawned on me that people knew full well what was going on, what was happening to black women, and we had made a collective decision not to take action. And I realized, I’m one of those people who is not standing with the victims. I had heard him on the radio. I had heard his music at barbecues, graduations, parties. It just hit me then, “We’re dancing to these women’s pain.”

Kenyette Barnes and I started #MuteRKelly in response to the news that this was happening in Georgia, where I live. I don’t know what I expected, but I wasn’t prepared for the response. We got so much hate mail. People were telling us we wanted to take a black man down, that we were believing these victims with no evidence, or that the women deserved what they said happened to them. It shocked me.

The petition that we circulated asked radio stations not to give him air time, and I figured it wouldn’t be a big deal. I thought, “OK, I’m going to send this petition to the radio stations, and it’ll be like, ‘Yep, he’s a horrible person. We’ve always known it. We’re going to stop playing him.'” That would be that. Two days of my life, and then this is taken care of for good. I was naive. It wasn’t like that at all. We were met with silence. Then we were met with ridicule.

There were a few bright spots, otherwise I’m not sure I could have kept at it. Women started to reaching out from all over, writing to us, “Oh my God, thank you so much for doing this. I’ve been doing my own personal protest against him forever.” Or, “I’ve been telling my friends that they shouldn’t support this man.” With #MuteRKelly, people started to feel like, “We have a banner to fly our flag under.”

Little by little, we have watched people come over. We’ve watched the tide turn, as people started to take a deeper look at these reports. The fact that the #MeToo movement and the Time’s Up movement exploded at the same time—that’s a factor. Because now the women who said, “I was a little uncomfortable with this, but I brushed it off” know that there’s a lot of us out there who aren’t going to be quiet.

12 Best Drugstore Foundations of 2019 Under $20

In a dream world we’d all have the skin of an Insta filter. But until that genetic code is cracked and bottled into a serum, there’s foundation. Obviously, this leads to some problems. We could use Dior and Giorgio Armani all day, but that cost isn’t always feasible if you’d rather invest the money in, say, your actual skin. And drugstore foundations—while much, much better than the ones from even five years ago—are tough to navigate without being able to swatch in-store. Who wants to buy something without knowing how it applies, dries down, and wears for eight hours? Luckily, there’s word of mouth, and if you ask any Glamour staffer about these 12 favorites, they’ll convince you to try them in a heartbeat. With nothing over $18, why not? Scroll on for the best in drugstore base makeup.

Ariana Grande’s *Thank U Next* Album: Everything We Know So Far

We’re not even two weeks into the new year, and Ariana Grande is already breaking the Internet. The pop star did that quite a bit last year, whether it was with her song “Thank U, Next,” her relationship with Pete Davidson, or just, ya know, breathing. And 2019 is shaping up to be just as big. Not only is she headlining Coachella in April—she’ll be the fourth female and youngest person ever to do it—but new music is on the way. First up is the new song “7 Rings,” which Grande revealed on social media will drop next Friday, January 18.

We already know the backstory behind this track, too. Grande explained on Twitter that she and her six friends, Vic, Courtney, Alexa, Tayla, Njomza, and Kaydence, were having a “rough day” in New York City when they decided to hit Tiffany & Co. for a pick-me-up. (You know, as all rich people do.) “We had too much champagne. I bought us all rings,” Grande tweeted. “It was very insane and funny. And on the way back to the [studio], Njomza was like ‘Bitch, this gotta be a song.’ So we wrote it that afternoon.”

As for the actual song, we don’t know much at this point. Grande teased the single cover on Thursday (January 10), which features the title spray-painted black on a pink door.

The music you hear at the beginning of Grande’s “Thank U, Next” video is actually the instrumental to “7 Rings,” Grande confirmed in December. Have a listen for yourself, below.

Meanwhile, Grande’s Thank U Next album is still shrouded in secrecy. Here’s everything we know so far:

1. The title. Grande confirmed it on November 3 when she revealed the phrase “Thank U, Next”—which she’d been tweeting a lot at that time—was both a song and album name.

2. The vibe. Billboard described the new sound as “deep, bass-driven bangers with trap beats alternating with airy, sad ballads.”

3. The tracklist. Three songs have been confirmed thus far: “Thank U Next,” “7 Rings,” and “Imagine,” which was released as a promotional single.

4. It’s sad. But that doesn’t mean it’s slow. “A lot of it sounds really upbeat, but it’s actually a super sad chapter,” she tells Billboard. “This [album’s] not particularly uplifting.”

5. Champagne helped make the record. Grande says Thank U, Next was the product of a lot of “feminine energy and champagne and music and laughter and crying,” according to Billboard.

6. There are no collaborations on the album. This will be Grande’s first album to feature just her.

7. The album is finished. Though Grande said she keeps “writing things she wants to add.” She teased the release would be at the end of 2018, so fans should definitely expect to hear it this year. Hopefully on the sooner side.

Related Stories:

Ariana Grande Just Made Coachella History

Pete Davidson Says He Cried With His Mom After Splitting With Ariana Grande

Here’s How Miley Cyrus Had Ariana Grande’s Back After Her Split With Pete Davidson

Your Favorite Stores Are Getting In On the Subscription Box Trend—and We Put Them to the Test

One of the biggest fashion trends of late: subscription boxes. How we shop is less about a hemline or a specific color but rather whether you want to rent or buy.

Rent the Runway (with its “unlimited” monthly service) and Stitch Fix (itself a $3 billion business) are the Goliaths paving the way. Jennifer Hyman, cofounder of Rent the Runway, frequently points out how the American woman buys 68 items of clothing year, some of which she never ends up wearing. (According to the company, the subscription part of its business has grown 150 percent year over year since it launched in 2016.)

“Social media has created an atmosphere in which, yeah, you could wear the same thing twice, but you’d rather not,” says Rachel Saunders, strategy director of retail strategy firm Cassandra. “So how do you do that without spending a fortune? It’s all contributed to this idea that it’s OK to share clothes with strangers.”

Allied Market Research estimates the clothing rental market will reach $1.856 billion in global value by 2023, with more and more players in the game, like Le Tote and Gwynnie Bee. Naturally, individual brands—ones you’d normally shop at their stand-alone stores or at a mall—now want a piece of that pie, especially as brick-and-mortar shopping continues to decline.

Classic workwear purveyor Ann Taylor, fashion-forward brand Vince, and even trend-focused label Express have all launched subscription services over the last few months that allow shoppers to test a curated selection of pieces at home before either buying their favorites and sending back the rest (and then being replenished with different options). Many of these ventures are being managed by the same company: New York–based CaaStle, which seems to have a lock on the back-end management of fashion subscriptions, at least for now.

So are these services really worth it when weighed against buying clothes outright? How easy is the rental process, really? How good is the selection? And does this mean the end of shopping as we know it?

We compared five of the big brand options (all of which, coincidentally, are being managed by CaaStle) to see how they stack up, what’s worth it, and what’s not. These might be early adopters, but judging by where the industry is growing, it’s likely you’ll see even more of your favorites jump into this space over the course of 2019.

PHOTO: Courtesy of Vince

Known for its minimal but still fashion-forward pieces, Vince enters the subscription game with Vince Unfold. To get started you create a virtual closet with at least 10 items (though it’s recommended that you add more than 24), from which the brand creates your first box. Each shipment comes with four pieces. When you’re done with it, you send it back and get four new ones in a brand-new box.

The biggest difference between Vince Unfold and other brand-specific subscription boxes comes down to one thing: inventory. Vince is much more high-end than other single labels dipping their toes in this market, with most pieces featuring three-figure price tags—think silk tank dresses ($345), shaggy bear coats ($695), and oversize cashmere cardigans ($495).

Price: $160 a month. You can exchange your four-item box an unlimited number of times, but you must return your whole box to do so. If you want to keep a piece that you’re renting, you can purchase it at a discount, between 20 and 60 percent off.

Pros: Vince clothes are gorgeous and luxurious, which means that every single item that comes in your box can easily be mixed and matched with whatever’s in your wardrobe. Additionally, the selection of products is pretty vast. You’ll get tons of mileage out of these clothes.

Cons: The price point is high, especially when you weigh it against Rent the Runway’s unlimited offering (which has Vince on its roster). Also, you can’t return pieces individually, only as a whole box, and you don’t pick what you’re getting in each shipment.

TL; DR: While this subscription still makes sense from a cost-benefit standpoint if you’re a big fan of Vince, they could improve on the details. Try it here.

PHOTO: Courtesy of Ann Taylor.

Infinite Style by Ann Taylor lets you rent three pieces from Ann Taylor (excluding Loft and Lou & Grey) at once. You have to select a minimum of eight pieces to add to a queue. It takes about three days to process and another two days to ship; you find out exactly which items from your edit are being shipped to you in an email with tracking information for your package.

Where Ann Taylor’s service really shines is in its abundance of workwear. We found pieces like houndstooth ankle pants (which retail for $98), a tweed sheath dress ($159), and a sequined fringe jacket ($129.)

Price: $95 a month. You can return the complete box for a new one as many times as you’d like throughout the month.

Pros: This is one of the best subscription box options out there if you need a big rotating closet of professional clothing. Plus, you get the option of buying clothes you’ve already rented for 60 to 70 percent off.

Cons: Given the higher price tag compared with comparable services, you have to really love the Ann Taylor look. You also have to return a complete box in order to get sent new product.

TL; DR: This is a solid solution to the what-to-wear problem, with some casual attire and cocktail looks thrown in too. Try it here.

PHOTO: Courtesy of Express.

Called the Express Style Trial, this service allows shoppers to rent three items from the brand at a time for $69.95 a month. There’s a pretty big range of merchandise to choose from, all of which feels very current—a striped jumpsuit (which retails for $79.90), a faux-leather-trimmed shift dress (also $79.90), and a satin maxidress ($88).

“We see Style Trial as an complement to our e-commerce and store business, allowing our customers to engage with fashion and experiment with new styles and trends that she may not otherwise invest in,” says Jim Hilt, executive vice president and chief customer experience officer at Express. “It provides our customer with easy access to the latest trends, as well as an ongoing rotation of staple pieces at a fraction of the prices.”

To begin renting, you have to add at least eight items to a virtual closet (though it’s recommended that you add around 20). From that selection, Express creates a box of three pieces to send to you. You can prioritize what you want, through a feature that promises “we’ll try to ship those first.” But once you’re done with those first three, you can ship everything back, and Express will dispatch a new box. You can do this as many times as you want. Express estimates that a super-active user could have 12 different pieces a month (or four boxes); an average user would probably have about nine (or three boxes).

Price: $69.95 a month. You can cancel the subscription at any time, and you can return your boxes to exchange for new items as frequently as you like.

Pros: The price, definitely—if you’re already a big fan of Express, you can maximize the amount of returns that you do throughout the month to get the most product.

Cons: The work-appropriate options are on the limited side (in general, the offerings are much better suited for casual wear). Because of the way that Express builds its subscription boxes, you don’t select the exact items that end up in your shipment. You also can’t cancel your subscription directly online, only over the phone.

TL; DR: If you are already a big Express shopper, the cost benefit of this is pretty great. Try it here.

PHOTO: Courtesy of Rebecca Taylor.

Rebecca Taylor’s foray into subscription boxes, RNTD, is comparable to Rent the Runway Unlimited in price—both are $159 a month. The brand grants you access to a rotating closet with four items at any given time; you must add at least 10 pieces to a queue, from which Rebecca Taylor then puts together your shipment.

“The pricing was meant to be realistic and attainable for our customer,” says Janice Sullivan, president of Rebecca Taylor. In other words: It’s hoping this service opens Rebecca Taylor up to a new shopper who otherwise couldn’t afford to constantly and consistently buy its pieces. And the “new arrivals” section has a solid mix of Rebecca Taylor’s signature dresses as well as some of its more trend-forward garments: a silk embroidered ruffle dress ($395), high-waisted plaid pants ($395), and a laminated navy trench coat ($1,295).

“I think consumers value options, the option to rent, to own, to lend, to resell—as a brand you want to move with her and be there on every level that makes sense,” Sullivan adds.

Price: $159 a month. You get four pieces per shipment, and you can send the box back for new items as often as you’d like.

Pros: It’s hard to not love Rebecca Taylor. And while a closet full of its pieces has long been out of reach for most shoppers, it’s suddenly much more accessible.

Cons: Like with Vince, you can’t return individual pieces to get new ones—only the full shipment. That’s really what sets it apart from Rent the Runway Unlimited, which carries Rebecca Taylor.

TL; DR: You’d have a pretty dreamy rotating wardrobe. You just have to love or let go of everything you get as a bundle. Try it here.

PHOTO: Courtesy of New York & Co.

New York & Co.’s NY&Company Closet is one of the most affordable subscription boxes out there, charging $49.95 a month for three items at a time from the brand—return them all, and receive a new selection in the mail.

This offering has a great mix of both work and weekend clothes, making it one of the most versatile single-brand subscription boxes. But like the other stores offering rental service, it’s one brand—you have to like the aesthetic. On offer are pieces like a leopard sweaterdress ($74.95), a red striped blazer ($79.95), and houndstooth wide-leg pants ($79.95).

Price: $49.95 a month. You get three items at a time; you can return the full box for new product as many times as you like.

Pros: You get a lot of bang for your buck with this one.

Cons: The unpredictability of not getting to choose exactly what comes in your shipment isn’t ideal.

TL; DR: This is a great value subscription service for someone who wants to test-drive this method of shopping. Try it here.

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