Princess Sofia of Sweden Is Fighting COVID-19 as a Medical Assistant

Princess Sofia of Sweden is temporarily trading in her tiara for scrubs amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Swedish royal (who married Prince Carl Philip in 2015) announced on Instagram Thursday, April 16 that she’d gone through training and has started working as a medical assistant at Sophiahemmet hospital in Stockholm to help in the fight against COVID-19. As you can see, her ID card simply reads “Sofia.” The princess is also the honorary chairman of the hospital.

“I am now placed in one of the hospital’s care departments, where together with other newly trained colleagues, I support and relieve the healthcare staff with different tasks,” Princess Sofia wrote on Instagram, explaining that her tasks will include cleaning and caring for patients.

“To have the opportunity to help in this difficult time is extremely rewarding,” she concluded. “Thanks!”

So how did she get this job? Well, an emergency program allows 80 people a week to take a three-day course at Sophiahemmet University College to learn how to support medical staff. According to a hospital spokesperson, the volunteers “can disinfect equipment, do shifts in the kitchen, and clean.”

Although the Sophiahemmet hospital has no confirmed coronavirus cases, it’s reportedly overwhelmed due to COVID-19. In a statement on Wednesday, April 15, The Royal Court said, “In the crisis we find ourselves in, the Princess wants to get involved and make a contribution as a voluntary worker to relieve the large workload of health care professionals.”

Princess Sofia of Sweden with assistant nurse Anna Kyhlstedt during Princess Sofia’s first day at work at Sophiahemmet hospital in Stockholm, Sweden.

JONAS EKSTROMER

Earlier this month, Miss England 2019, Bhasha Mukherjee, returned to work as a junior doctor at the Pilgrim Hospital in Boston, Lincolnshire. “When you are doing all this humanitarian work abroad, you’re still expected to put the crown on, get ready…look pretty,” she told CNN at the time. “I wanted to come back home. I wanted to come and go straight to work.”

As news about the novel coronavirus pandemic rapidly evolves, Glamour is committed to bringing our readers accurate and up-to-date information. As a result, information in this story and others like it may be updated. For the most recent news about COVID-19, please visit the CDC, WHO, and your state’s Department of Health.

7 Best Espresso Machines in 2020 to Unleash Your Inner Barista

It seems like eons ago when we were routinely sipping perfectly frothed lattes brewed by our local baristas, but bringing the best espresso machine into your kitchen could help fill the void of your favorite neighborhood cafe. Sure, you won’t be pumping out Lourve-level portraits in cappuccino form on your first try, but you can still whip up caffeinated beverages that far outshine the canned cold brew you’ve been pounding. Aside from quality of taste and consistency, investing in an espresso machine will make an impact on your wallet, because every coffee lover knows how quickly a daily caffeine fix adds up.

Making your beverages of choice at home is a great way to practice social distancing, and you might just learn a thing or two about the art of a great espresso. You don’t have to be a professional barista to create complex, flavorful drinks—but the first step is a great espresso machine. We spoke to Giorgio Milos, Master Barista for Illy Caffè, about what to look for in a quality machine. Ahead, his insights on how to find the one for you, and the seven best espresso machines reviewers can’t stop raving about.

What kind of espresso machines exist out there?

The best espresso machine for you depends on your needs and experience level. Manual machines, which you use to pump espresso out by hand sans electricity, are the most difficult to master. Semi-automatic machines are prepped the same way, but they operate with a dial or a button for water flow, rather than a lever. Automatic machines require you to grind the beans before they automatically brew your espresso drink, while super-automatic machines grind the beans for you. Just looking for something convenient? Capsule machines are the way to go. “For at-home use, I recommend capsule machines which prepare a consistent, beautifully tasting espresso,” explains Milos. “I have the illy X7.1 at home and use it every morning, but there are smaller and more affordable machines like the Y3.2, which is good for first-time buyers.”

How does an espresso machine work?

“For coffee purists, espresso is the quintessential coffee preparation—rich, aromatic, and velvety all at once; a natural layer of crema on top belying a full-bodied, yet deftly balanced liquid below,” muses Milos. “A jet of hot water passes under a pressure of nine bars through a cake-like layer of ground and tamped coffee. It’s truly a small miracle of chemistry and physics: science and art gliding together on air.” Securing a machine with nine bars of pressure is what experts will tell you makes true espresso, but stove-top alternatives will still get the job done if you’re on a budget.

What is the best espresso machine?

There are several top-rated machines to consider, at a range of price points and functionalities, but the best machines have optimal pressure and water temperature. “Pressure is what makes espresso different from any other coffee preparation. Fortunately, almost all espresso machines come with a pump system that can handle the job and apply nine bars of pressure. The temperature of the water is even more critical, and the range must be within 90-94C (194-201F).” If you’ve been improving your home while you’re stuck inside, arm your kitchen with tasty drinks via the best espresso machines around. Ahead, seven models that rose to the top, backed by thousands of reviewers who sung their praises.

Zac Efron Fans Are Livid About That High School Musical Reunion Performance

A few fans on Twitter weren’t feeling so happy after Zac Efron’s appearance in the mini High School Musical reunion for the recent Disney Family Singalong.

Here’s what went down: On April 16, ABC hosted a singalong of a bunch of Disney classics performed by the likes of Ariana Grande, Darren Criss, and Queen Beyoncé herself. But for some reason, Efron did not take part in the highly-anticipated performance of “We’re All in This Together” by the original High School Musical cast. Ashley Tisdale, Lucas Grabeel, Vanessa Hudgens, Monique Coleman, and Corbin Bleu joined director Kenny Ortega on the video call, but Efron simply introduced the performance before peacing out.

“It’s my greatest pleasure to introduce a musical performance by some of my oldest friends,” he said, never to be heard from again.

Fans on Twitter were not impressed. “WHERE!! IS!! ZAC!! EFRON!!” one user wrote. “my childhood I am crying.”

Still, at least some were thrilled to welcome Joshua Bassett from High School Musical: the Musical: the Series on Disney+ into the fold, since he ended up performing Troy Bolton’s parts instead of Efron.

At least one user took the opportunity to remind everyone that actor Drew Seeley was the actual voice behind Troy Bolton for the songs of High School Musical’s first movie, including the iconic “Start of Something New” and “Breaking Free.” In fact, he even toured as Troy for the High School Musical: The Concert tour. True story.

HSM director Kenny Ortega told Deadline that Efron was genuinely excited to join the reunion and had a very good reason for skipping the singing bit. “We couldn’t reach Zac until late but when we did, he immediately jumped in, of course,” Ortega said. “Everyone we reached out to was quick—and you’ll see it in their spirit and the way they come together from their homes. They recognize this is an opportunity to strengthen spirits for those joining us for the broadcast.” It seems like Efron just didn’t have enough rehearsal time!

As Troy Bolton would say…

The Top 5 Dumbest Quarantine Fights I’ve Had With My Partner

It’s officially Day ??? of quarantine—I’ve lost count in this never-ending purgatory. If you’re lucky enough to be healthy and bored at home like I am, it’s hard not to drive yourself or the people around you crazy. I have single friends starting to flirt with their houseplants and family members reaching way past their limit on “quality” virtual time together. I’ve learned that isolation can put a strain on even the healthiest relationships, and if you’re a couple confined to a small apartment, get ready to become overwhelmingly annoyed by the seemingly most innocent of actions.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my boyfriend—this is the best relationship I’ve ever been in. I still consider us very happy, but after weeks of not seeing a single other human when he breathes too loudly, you’ll find me googling “can rolling eyes too hard cause permanent damage?”

Madeline Hirsch

Back in simpler times (i.e. February), our lives were split between separate apartments and demanding jobs. Now we’re together every second of every day—I can hear his Zoom call as I type this. As our world shrinks to the confines of a tight New York City apartment, our fights have gotten laughably stupid. Blame it on the close quarters, lingering uncertainty, or direct lack of sunlight, but I’m officially petty. Behold:

The Puzzle Fight:

He abandoned a highly difficult New Yorker puzzle to play video games. It was a Saturday night, and I plugged away for a few hours fueled by rage and Lambrusco. I never finished it, but I did somehow conflate “supportive boyfriend” with “supportive puzzle partner” for an entire night, as proven by my stage sighs.

The Zoom Conference Call Debacle:

Around Day 7, we bickered for an hour about who had the more annoying Zoom voice. I admittedly get about five decibels louder on calls even though “we have the technology” to be understood at a normal volume. (Note: The man I love apparently is a fan of the “circle back.” So, in my book, that’s equally offensive.)

The Day I Found Out I’m “Terrible” at Making Coffee:

In quarantine, whoever brews coffee gets 15 minutes less sleep—a lifetime when you’re less of a morning “person,” more of a morning “lump of existential dread.” After a few weeks of taking on this monumental task of selfless devotion, I found out I’m doing it wrong. Apparently, I’m not “careful” enough to avoid grounds. Is this a personal attack? Not really. Did I treat it as one for a full 20 minutes? Yes.

The Most Comfortable Women’s Underwear of 2020: Aerie, Everlane, & More

Across the internet, you’ll find impassioned cases for the best pants to wear when you don’t plan to leave home. Leggings, jeans, and sweats are the biggest contenders, but the most comfortable women’s underwear is often overlooked. Of course, each of the classics has its merits. A good pair of leggings offer support and perhaps a promise that you’ll practice some planks. Jeans provide comfort with their ability to help you maintain a sense of normalcy. And then there are sweatpants: the option that feels as close as possible to being wrapped up in a warm duvet even after getting out of bed. But there’s no need to choose between any of these when your second-skin layer of clothing is up to par. Case in point: the 21 pairs of comfy underwear below.

While personal preference is everything when it comes to shopping intimates, there’s something especially soothing about a pair of fuller-cut underwear right now. We’re talking about briefs, even granny panties—they’re comfortable, soft base layers that offer support but are light on compression. And they’re hot. Yes, hot. The most comfortable women’s underwear can still have delicate details of lace, mesh, and pointelle that feel sexy without being a strappy thong or too-complicated piece of lingerie. Of course, it’s your prerogative to wear your comfy underwear as pants—whether your plans include rewatching all of Dawson’s Creek or briefing your coworkers over Zoom (camera placement considered, of course). Ahead, 21 pairs of the most comfortable women’s underwear.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Outlander’s Sam Heughan Opens Up About the ‘Constant Bullying’ He’s Faced for 6 Years

Outlander actor Sam Heughan posted a lengthy message to Twitter on Thursday night, April 17, opening up about the “constant bullying” he says he’s faced online for the past six years.

“I am at a loss, upset, hurt, and have to speak out,” he wrote. “It’s affecting my life, mental state, and is a daily concern. My costars, friends, family, myself, in fact I’m associated with, has been subjected to personal slurs, shaming, abuse, death threats, stalking, sharing private information, and vile, false narrative.”

Heughan then got specific, mentioning certain rumors and stories that have plagued him over the years. “Recently, these false claims vary from me manipulating fans, being a closet-homosexual, trying to mislead or exhort fans for money, and disregarding COVID advice,” he wrote. “I’ve done non [sic] of the above.”

The 39-year-old says the latest bout of criticism he’s received has to do with his decision to stay in Hawaii during coronavirus quarantine. He says he traveled to the state not knowing how severe the situation with COVID-19 would become and, after talking to people he trusts, decided his safest option was to stay.

“Upon the advice of everyone I trust, I decided to remain in a safe environment,” he wrote. “It was a good decision. I am safe, isolated, putting no one at risk, and am not a burden to the locals.”

He continued, “We have not been asked to leave…Recently I was ill for three months and am being doubly careful.”

Heughan ended his message urging detractors to unfollow him and thanking the fans who have supported him throughout the years. “I’m so hurt by this,” he posted. “As an actor in these time, we feel impotent. We can’t do much but I have tried to use what leverage I have to provide a voice to charities that need it and hopefully a little entertainment or light relief. For those still unhappy I suggest you unfollow.”

“To every fan that has supported me and the work I do, thank you,” he said. “I’m so grateful, from the bottom of my heart. Stay safe and please be kind to yourself and each other.”

Read Sam Heughan’s full statement in the tweet, above.

Sam Heughan of ‘Outlander’ Opens Up About the ‘Constant Bullying’ He’s Faced for 6 Years

Outlander actor Sam Heughan posted a lengthy message to Twitter on Thursday night, April 17, opening up about the “constant bullying” he says he’s faced online for the past six years.

“I am at a loss, upset, hurt, and have to speak out,” he wrote. “It’s affecting my life, mental state, and is a daily concern. My costars, friends, family, myself, in fact I’m associated with, has been subjected to personal slurs, shaming, abuse, death threats, stalking, sharing private information, and vile, false narrative.”

Heughan then got specific, mentioning certain rumors and stories that have plagued him over the years. “Recently, these false claims vary from me manipulating fans, being a closet-homosexual, trying to mislead or exhort fans for money, and disregarding COVID advice,” he wrote. “I’ve done non [sic] of the above.”

The 39-year-old says the latest bout of criticism he’s received has to do with his decision to stay in Hawaii during coronavirus quarantine. He says he traveled to the state, not knowing how severe the situation with COVID-19 would become and, after talking to people he trusts, decided his safest option was to stay.

“Upon the advice of everyone I trust, I decided to remain in a safe environment,” he wrote. “It was a good decision. I am safe, isolated, putting no one at risk, and am not a burden to the locals.”

He continued, “We have not been asked to leave…Recently I was ill for three months and am being doubly careful.”

Heughan ended his message urging detractors to unfollow him and thanking the fans who have supported him throughout the years. “I’m so hurt by this,” he posted. “As an actor in these time, we feel impotent. We can’t do much but I have tried to use what leverage I have to provide a voice to charities that need it and hopefully a little entertainment or light relief. For those still unhappy I suggest you unfollow.”

“To every fan that has supported me and the work I do, thank you,” he said. “I’m so grateful, from the bottom of my heart. Stay safe and please be kind to yourself and each other.”

Read Sam Heughan’s full statement in the tweet, above.

Too Hot to Handle Is Basically Love Island With No Touching

Perfect for people craving content adjacent to Love Is Blind and Bachelor in Paradise, Netflix’s latest reality show, Too Hot to Handle, centers on a group of young, hot singles who move to a resort and are tasked with forging deep, romantic connections. A $100,000 cash prize is waiting for them if they succeed.

But here’s the catch: They’re not allowed to have any sexual contact with each other. Any kissing, fondling, or actual sex results in a decrease in the prize money. Wild, right? It takes all the best elements of Love Is Blind and Bachelor in Paradise and amplifies them.

There’s another show Too Hot to Handle will remind you of, too: Love Island, the British reality dating series about hot singles who spend an entire summer coupling up with other hot singles in hopes of emerging as the audience’s favorite duo. If you even casually know what Love Island is, you’ll see the comparisons to Too Hot to Handle easily. If not, allow me explain—and after you finish Too Hot to Handle, give Love Island a spin. I promise you’ll be just as hooked.

The setting

The mega-mansions that house the contestants in each of these shows are just as important as the people themselves. They are similar in style, both with gathering areas, fire pits, getting-ready pods, and huge pools. All the daters sleep in a single room with multiple beds, which means it’s very difficult to get away with…you know, doing things. On Love Island, they just don’t care and do it anyway. On Too Hot to Handle, they literally can’t without breaking the rules.

The snarky narrators

The best part of Love Island is arguably the narrator, Iain Stirling, whose shady commentary grounds the hot-people problems of the show in some kind of reality. The same thing applies to Too Hot to Handle, courtesy of a delightfully sarcastic female narrator who doesn’t let any of the ridiculous things the cast does go by without some comment. When she rags on Haley for thinking the word “loophole” meant “silver lining,” or when Chloe congratulated herself for saying “animosity?” I died.

Dates

One-on-one dates on Love Island and Too Hot to Handle don’t happen consistently, like they do in Bachelor Nation. They’re sporadic and impromptu—and both daters don’t know about them until minutes before. The dates on these shows also aren’t extravagant like they are on The Bachelor. They happen in hot tubs or on blankets by the beach. Nothing fancy, but arguably more intimate than anything we’ve seen on any Bachelor show.

The gathering spot.

In both Love Island and Too Hot to Handle, there’s a spot where the collective group meets for big announcements: a fire pit. It’s here where the hosts typically drop major bombshells, like cast eliminations on Love Island or if the group has lost money on Too Hot to Handle. In the latter’s case, it’s even funnier because the host is a talking, Alexa-like robot named Lana.

The introduction of new housemates.

These shows each do a good job at bringing new cast members in to shake up the state of the union. On Love Island, it’s to break up or challenge existing couples. On Too Hot to Handle, it’s similar, but mostly it’s to see if a new person may tempt someone to break the no-hooking up rule.

The dress code

Everyone is in swimsuits 98% of the time. During the other 2%, they’re wearing Instagram influencer-ready evening wear, which is funny because….who are they dressing up for? I’ve always wondered this on Love Island, and I had the same confusion during Too Hot to Handle. I understand it’s a TV show, but the pomp and circumstance of it all is not lost on me.

The cast of Too Hot to Handle. 

Aline Arruda/Netflix

And last but not least: The conceit of the show

While the methods of the programs differ, the goal is to same: to find a true romantic relationship that stands on solid ground, and then see how money plays into that. Both shows offer the promise of a cash prize if you find true love. What happens after that, though, is anyone’s game.

Too Hot to Handle is now streaming on Netflix

No-Heat Curls: We Tried TikTok’s Viral Hack on 5 Hair Types

At this point in quarantine, I have spent so much time on Instagram it could be considered my side hustle (minus, you know, getting paid for it). Everything is starting to blur together between the fluffy coffee, pillow challenges, and loaf after loaf of banana bread, that it takes something seriously different to get me to stop scrolling and actually double tap.

A few days ago I stumbled upon a video from hairstylist Justine Marjan that actually stopped me in my tracks. While, yes, what initially caught my eye was her adorable cherub sweatshirt, I stayed because she was braiding a pair of stockings into her hair for no-heat curls, a hack she had picked up from TikTok. It looked a little absurd, but the results were gorgeous.

The method is easy enough. Take a pair of tights, and drape it on your head like a headband, using an alligator clip to keep it in place. In the comments Marjan mentions you can prep your hair with a little texture spray or hairspray for extra hold, but as long as your hair is damp you should be fine. On each side of your head, divide your hair into two sections, and French braid the tights into your hair, using the leg of the stockings as the third section of hair. Secure with hair ties, and go to sleep. In the morning, undo your braids and shake out the waves.

I was hooked. It looked mesmerizingly easy—like the “rag curls” I used to do when I was little, except instead of tight Shirley Temple ringlets, it produces those elusive perfectly undone waves that I’m always trying to get right. And the fact that it doesn’t use any heat is perfect for zhushing up my hair for Zoom calls, without adding any damage.

Still, I hold a lot of skepticism for these kinds of “universal” hair hacks. What works on fine, flat hair rarely does the same for someone with thick waves or frizz. So, I enlisted a few Glamour editors—all with varying hair types—to give TiktTok’s famous no-heat curls technique a try. Here’s how it went.

Talia Gutierrez

Outer Banks: People Are Absolutely Obsessed With Netflix’s New Show

Warning: Light spoilers ahead.

Another weekend of social distancing looms, but don’t worry:Netflix has you covered with its new show Outer Banks, a Riverdale meets The O.C. meets Gossip Girl hybrid that will keep you so entertained, you’ll forget about everything that’s going on in the world. (And while it’s important to stay informed about what’s happening with the coronavirus, our brains also need to decompress. This show is ideal for that.)

Outer Banks centers on John B. Rutledge (Chase Stokes), a 17-year-old boy who lives in the Outer Banks region of North Carolina. After his father goes mysteriously missing in the pursuit of a $400 million treasure, he and his friends—a group of unpopular, not-so-wealthy kids nicknamed the Pogues—set out to find the gold themselves. But they face several obstacles along the way, namely the Kooks, the wealthier, elite teens in town who clash with the Pogues every chance they get. There are also love triangles, interfamilial issues, and more soapy intrigue that places Outer Banks nicely alongside the other great teen shows of pop culture.

Seriously, you will find something to latch onto with this series. Maybe it’s the love triangle between John B., Sarah (Madelyn Cline), and Topper (Austin North). Or perhaps you’ll get invested in the personal lives of the other Pogues: JJ (Rudy Pankow), Pope (Jonathan Daviss), and Kiara (Madison Bailey). There are romance entanglements among that, group too. Perhaps the mystery surrounding John B.’s father will pull you in, or the question of who finds the treasure in the end. There’s so much going on with Outer Banks, and it’s all gripping.

These Twitter reactions, below, are proof of that. People can’t stop talking about the show, and they all have something different to say. Take a look for yourself, below.

So why not join in on the conversation? Outer Banks is now streaming on Netflix.