Black Panther’s Ruth E. Carter Is the First Black Woman To Win an Oscar for Costume Design

At this year’s Oscars, Ruth E. Carter became the first black person to ever win Best Costume Design at the Academy Awards. Carter received the honor for her work on Black Panther., but this isn’t Carter’s first historic Oscars moment. In 1993, she became the first-ever black person to be nominated in the category for her work on Spike Lee’s Malcolm X. She was also nominated for Steven Spielberg’s Amistad in 1998. And this year, the third time was a charm.

While accepting the award, Carter acknowledged her prior nominations. “Wow, wow, I got it,” she said. “This has been a long time coming.” Carter also thanked her prior collaborator, Lee. “I hope this makes you proud. Marvel may have created the first black superhero, but through costume design, we turned him into an African king… It’s been my life’s honor to create costumes. Thank you to the Academy, thank you for honoring African royalty, and the empowered way women can look and lead onscreen.”

Carter designed the film’s iconic Afrofuturist looks—from the red armor worn by Wakanda’s female warriors, to King T’Challa’s ceremonial garb. Carter previously discussed her vision for the film’s costumes with Glamour, describing the style as: “we have an African aesthetic here, and we also have a futuristic, modern aesthetic. This is a place that’s advanced in technology, more advanced than the rest of the world, so you take those elements and you have to discover a culture. You have to put them together and make up your own.”

She also opened up about the immense pressure she felt to get the style right. “I felt a lot of pressure, every day, to not do a stereotype. Is this going to look common, or is it going to look great? Is it going to look like something we’ve seen before? Is it being crafted in a way that looks like it’s a play or a cartoon? Or a fake thing? Or is it being crafted in a way that’s going to look like it’s real and has a real function? Does it have fashion and beauty? The overall ideal is beauty. We want it to be beautiful, because we’re honoring it if we show it in a beautiful light. We’re dishonoring it if we show it in the light it’s been shown in, which is ugly and dark.”

With Carter’s historical win this evening, and the incredible reaction viewers had to the costumes, it’s safe to say that Carter absolutely nailed it.

Emilia Clarke Debuts a Dramatic Hair Change at the Oscars 2019

Emilia Clarke is no stranger to a dramatic hair transformation. Although she’s a natural brunette, the actress is most well-known for her almost-white platinum blond wig she wears as the Mother of Dragons, Daenerys Targaryen, on Game of Thrones. And for the past year, she’s been rocking a platinum shade IRL, too. As any (unnatural) blond knows, keeping hair that light does a number on it, and this past September, Clarke chopped her hair into a lob due to damage.

The actress just made another dramatic hair change, and debuted a deep chocolate hue where else but on the Oscars 2019 red carpet. She teased her new look on Instagram en route to the ceremony with a selfie captioned, “Blondes have more fun eh?! Well I will see about that this fine #oscar2019 evening….. let the good times roll.” (She also hashtagged #illegitimatelycantpeeinthisdress #butwhocaresitsthegoddamnoscars because obviously she’s the people’s queen.)

As if the change hadn’t already gotten fans talking, the hosts of E!‘s red carpet show mentioned that Clarke had actually dyed her own hair using a box dye from the drugstore before the show (which would be even more daring than riding a dragon). But after much speculation (like what brand has dye that good and how do we get it?), it turns out the hue is actually the work of a pro—Virtue ambassador and colorist Nicola Clarke. According to Clarke, “Emilia returned to a rich brunette for the Oscars—a really rich, healthy glossy shade that is just a touch darker than her natural color.” She used Virtue ColorKick to amp the gloss and shine and maintain the health of Clarke’s hair during the color process.

Clarke hasn’t yet opened up about why she changed her hair so close to the ceremony, but she has been vocal about how much blond has been a PITA in the past. In fact, she was reluctant to go platinum in the first place, since she was much more likely to be recognized by fans. As she told Harper’s Bazaar, “You clock anyone who’s got this hair color anyway, so you see someone with peroxide blond hair you look, and then [people] go, ‘Oh my God, it’s that chick from the show with the dragons’—and then I’m running!”

Not only that, when she chopped her hair late last year, she talked about how bleaching it for the show nearly ruined her hair. So perhaps this is an attempt to remedy that. Or maybe she just wants to get back to her roots. Either way, she slays.

There’s an Oscar-Winning Netflix Doc You Need to See: Period. End of Sentence.

The Academy Awards haven’t always favored female directors. In the 91-year history of the show, only five have ever been nominated for Best Director, and this year, once again, the category is made up of solely men. It’s not entirely dire, though, if you turn your attention to other categories. Take, for example, Period. End of Sentence., which won Best Documentary – Short Subject and was directed by a woman: Rayka Zehtabchi, a 25-year-old Iranian-American director.

Period. End of Sentence., a documentary that tackles the stigma around menstruation in rural India, is currently available for streaming on Netflix. The 26-minute film follows a group of women who use a new machine to create low-cost sanitary pads to create financial independence while also improving feminine hygiene in their village. Now, according to TIME, their pads are being used in 40 nearby villages. The doc also gives viewers a peek into how taboo menstruation is in these communities, where 23 percent of girls drop out school when they hit puberty due to their periods.

For Zehtabchi, seeing just how ingrained period stigma was for the women was the most life-changing part of making the film. Zehtabchi tells Glamour, “Some of the craziest moments during filming would be when we talked to older women—who had gone their entire lives menstruating and should have been talking to their daughters about menstruation—but couldn’t even tell us why it happened every month, or why they got it. It breaks your heart because if they’re so afraid of the thing that makes them women, then I can’t imagine what else you would be afraid to do or talk about.”

Zehtabchi was approached to direct the documentary by The Pad Project, the incredible organization that first brought this story to light. In 2012, Los Angeles-based teacher Melissa Burton brought students and staffers together to travel to Kathikhera, India to set up the pad-making machine that is featured in the film. But after their trip, they wanted to do more than just install a machine: They wanted to start a conversation about period stigma around the world. And thus, the documentary was born.

Even though the film has now received such incredible recognition, Zehtabchi and the Pad Project’s mission has stayed the same: to spread as much awareness about this issue as possible. “After seeing the film I hope people understand this period stigma doesn’t just effect those in India, we experience it in the United States and in other cultures as well,” Zehtabchi says. “I also want viewers to realize that empowering women worldwide really starts with beginning with opening up the conversation around menstruation. We can implement feminine hygiene, but first we have to break the taboo. I also want people to realize this isn’t just a film for women, it’s for men too. They’re 50 percent of the population and men need to be having these conversations and championing the film just as much as women are.”

As for being one of a few female directors nominated by the academy, Zehtabchi says, “Why does it have to be so amazing? Why does this have to be shocking that I’m a female director and that I’ve made a film about a women’s issue, in a country we don’t think much, and that the film is getting attention?” We couldn’t agree more.

Samantha Leach is an assistant culture editor at Glamour. Follow her on Twitter @_sleach.

Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Maya Rudolph Didn’t Host the Oscars, But They Should Have

For the first time in thirty years, the Oscars went forward without a host. There was much speculation about what the award ceremony would be like without a traditional emcee, but turns out it was handled: Three legends—Tina Fey, Maya Rudolph, and Amy Poehler—were brought out to set the tone for the evening.

Taking the stage early in the show, Fey joked right away that the three were definitely, 100 percent not the evening’s hosts. “We are not your hosts, but we’re going to stand here a little too long so that the people who get USA TODAY tomorrow will think we hosted.”

This lead to all of us watching at home to wonder the same question: Why the hell weren’t they hosting the Oscars? One viewer even tweeted, “Maya Rudolph, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler should never be at an awards show not hosting it.”

Fey, Rudolph, and Poehler have been slaying the game together since they were all co-stars on Saturday Night Live. (Their famous “mom jeans” sketch from the show is worth a revisit, if you somehow haven’t seen it.) And it’s not like these women don’t have experience—Fey and Poehler have hosted the Golden Globes together multiple times, starting in 2013. Last year, after Rudolph presented at the Oscars alongside Tiffany Haddish, Twitter lead a campaign for the two of them to host the 2019 show together.

Imagine a world where we got more than just three quick minutes of Fey, Rudolph, and Poehler’s banter? Even better, what if that included a few incredible cameos from Haddish? Hello, ratings gold.

Instead, they revealed that they were simply on stage to present the Best Supporting Actress award—no surprise hosting twist here. The three then spoke out about how women always offer a supporting role in their work. While that included joking that they support each other’s boobs (because, of course) and that Rudolph dubs Fey’s lines overseas, their message rang true. After The Oscars suffered from a series of controversies leading up the ceremony—including the removal of original host Kevin Hart—these women still showed up and supported the Oscars, helping the show put its best food forward. Because that’s what women do.

So next year, give us what we all want.

The Crazy Rich Asians Cast Totally Won the 2019 Oscars Red Carpet

So many celebrities are having a blast at tonight’s Oscars, but no group is more jazzed to be there than the cast of Crazy Rich Asians. The movie, which hit theaters last summer and is based on the popular novel by Kevin Kwan, was a critical and commercial success—and it turned its cast members into bonafide superstars. Of course, Michelle Yeoh was already a legend before Crazy Rich Asians, but the film introduced us to Henry Golding and made us even more obsessed with Awkwafina, Constance Wu, and Gemma Chan.

We knew the group’s red-carpet looks would be on point, but we didn’t know seeing them all together tonight would inspire such “squad goals” envy. That term is tossed around a lot, I know, but when you see just how much fun the Crazy Rich Asians cast is having at the Oscars, you’ll wish you were part of their crew.

Let’s start with the fact Awkwafina’s Oscars purse is literally a gold tequila flask. As if I wasn’t already stanning her.

We also need to talk about their fashion choices. Gemma Chan looks like an actual Disney Princess.

Constance Wu is feeling the hell out of her dress. Wouldn’t you?

Henry Golding looks like he walked straight out of Pride and Prejudice. Mr. Darcy is shaking.

And Michelle Yeoh looks like…well, an icon. We honestly don’t deserve her.

Naturally, the cast is spending much of the night loving on each other. I’m very into this photo of Wu and Awkwafina spilling tea before the actual show started:

Plus, this photo of Yeoh and Awkwafina? We need a buddy comedy starring them immediately. Just go ahead and take all my money.

Twitter is just as obsessed with the Crazy Rich Asians cast tonight as I am. Below, check out just a few reactions.

BRB, re-watching the movie 6,000 more times.

Oscars 2019 Red Carpet: All the Details on Lady Gaga’s 128.54-Carat Tiffany & Co. Oscars Necklace

From the Golden Globes to the SAGs, Lady Gaga has made statement after stunning statement on the red carpet this awards season. She closed out the A Star Is Born victory lap at the Oscars, where she’s up for two awards, Best Actress and Best Original Song. Her final look was not only another notable entry in her fashion legacy, but it also featured an important piece of design history.

Lady Gaga walked the Oscars red carpet in a black Alexander McQueen gown with matching elbow-length gloves. It was her jewelry that captured everyone’s attention, though: She was decked out in Tiffany & Co. jewelry, including the cushion-cut brilliant Tiffany Diamond necklace.

The Fancy Yellow stone at the center of Lady Gaga’s necklace weighs 128.54 carats. It dates back to 1887, and was purchased by Charles Lewis Tiffany himself in 1878, according to a press release from Tiffany & Co.

In addition to the Tiffany Diamond, the necklace also features 16 cushion-cut diamonds and 46 round brilliant diamonds. But it’s not just the size and provenance of the stone that makes Lady Gaga’s accessory so special. The last time this piece of jewelry left the Tiffany vaults was for a promotional shoot Breakfast at Tiffany’s—which makes Audrey Hepburn the last person to wear it publicly.

Lady Gaga is up for Best Actress at this year’s Oscars. Hepburn worn the category in 1962, for her role in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Throughout awards season, fans have been drawing comparisons between Lady Gaga’s outfits and those of classic Hollywood legends. For instance, her Valentino gown from the Golden Globes was likened to the dress Judy Garland wore in the 1954 version of A Star Is Born.

This is the first time the Tiffany Diamond makes an appearance on the red carpet, according to Reed Krakoff, Chief Artistic Officer of Tiffany & Co. Lady Gaga’s stylists, Sandra Amador and Tom Eerebout, said in a statement: “The chance to work with such an amazing piece of design and history tonight is a creative dream come true. There are so many beautiful jewels in the world, but the radiant Tiffany Diamond, which weighs over 128 carats, is truly exceptional, which is just so fitting for Lady Gaga.”

Oscars 2019: The Hair and Makeup Looks Everyone Will Be Talking About

Just like that, awards season is coming to a close, and the 2019 Oscars is sure to send it out with a bang. While it’s arguably the biggest awards show of the season, this year there’s more buzz surrounding the event than ever, given it’s the first time in 30 years the show will have no host, there’s no clear frontrunner for best picture, and Gaga may or may not get one step closer to an EGOT.

One thing we do know for sure is we can count on the Oscars to deliver some jaw-dropping beauty looks. While it’s been a strong awards season beauty-wise, from Cardi B’s incredible updo at the Grammys to Sandra Oh’s waves at the Golden Globes, the Oscars are always a league of their own. While the other ceremonies tend to lean more experimental, the Oscars are the epitome of true Hollywood glamour.

Check out our favorite hair and makeup looks from the Oscars red carpet, below. We’ll be adding more details as they roll in throughout the night.

Oscars 2019: Every Single Look From the Red Carpet

The Oscars are the grand finale of awards season, with the most stacked guest list and some of the most highly-anticipated red carpet looks. You can always expect to spot some gowns fresh off the Fashion Week runways, making their Hollywood debut at the Academy Awards. Then, there are the custom creations that end up making red-carpet history at the event. At the 2019 ceremony, there were plenty of contenders for the Oscars Fashion Hall of Fame, from Emilia Clarke’s sparkly Balmain to Constance Wu’s princess-worthy Versace. Catch up on every single look from this year’s red carpet, right here.

There’s an Oscar-Nominated Netflix Doc You Need to See: Period. End of Sentence.

The Academy Awards haven’t always favored female directors. In the 91-year history of the show, only five have ever been nominated for Best Director, and this year, once again, the category is made up of solely men. It’s not entirely dire, though, if you turn your attention to other categories. Take, for example, Period. End of Sentence., which is nominated for Best Documentary – Short Subject and was directed by a woman: Rayka Zehtabchi, a 25-year-old Iranian-American director.

Period. End of Sentence., a documentary that tackles the stigma around menstruation in rural India, is currently available for streaming on Netflix. The 26-minute film follows a group of women who use a new machine to create low-cost sanitary pads to create financial independence while also improving feminine hygiene in their village. Now, according to TIME, their pads are being used in 40 nearby villages. The doc also gives viewers a peek into how taboo menstruation is in these communities, where 23 percent of girls drop out school when they hit puberty due to their periods.

For Zehtabchi, seeing just how ingrained period stigma was for the women was the most life-changing part of making the film. Zehtabchi tells Glamour, “Some of the craziest moments during filming would be when we talked to older women—who had gone their entire lives menstruating and should have been talking to their daughters about menstruation—but couldn’t even tell us why it happened every month, or why they got it. It breaks your heart because if they’re so afraid of the thing that makes them women, then I can’t imagine what else you would be afraid to do or talk about.”

Zehtabchi was approached to direct the documentary by The Pad Project, the incredible organization that first brought this story to light. In 2012, Los Angeles-based teacher Melissa Burton brought students and staffers together to travel to Kathikhera, India to set up the pad-making machine that is featured in the film. But after their trip, they wanted to do more than just install a machine: They wanted to start a conversation about period stigma around the world. And thus, the documentary was born.

Even though the film has now received such incredible recognition, Zehtabchi and the Pad Project’s mission has stayed the same: to spread as much awareness about this issue as possible. “After seeing the film I hope people understand this period stigma doesn’t just effect those in India, we experience it in the United States and in other cultures as well,” Zehtabchi says. “I also want viewers to realize that empowering women worldwide really starts with beginning with opening up the conversation around menstruation. We can implement feminine hygiene, but first we have to break the taboo. I also want people to realize this isn’t just a film for women, it’s for men too. They’re 50 percent of the population and men need to be having these conversations and championing the film just as much as women are.”

As for being one of a few female directors nominated by the academy, Zehtabchi says, “Why does it have to be so amazing? Why does this have to be shocking that I’m a female director and that I’ve made a film about a women’s issue, in a country we don’t think much, and that the film is getting attention?” We couldn’t agree more.

Samantha Leach is an assistant culture editor at Glamour. Follow her on Twitter @_sleach.

Here’s Your First Look at Target’s 3 New Sleepwear and Intimates Brands

In the past two years, Target has given its its in-house fashion brands a major overhaul, all while expanding its commitment to inclusivity. A New Day and Universal Thread launched with a full range of sizes, 00 to 26W or XS to 4X, from the get-go; Kona Sol, its newest swim label, debuted with an unretouched campaign. This spring, the retailer is adding three new brands to its womenswear portfolio, zeroing in on a specific category of apparel: intimates and sleepwear.

The first of the trio is Auden, an expansive line of bras and panties (there are 40 and 50 available styles to choose from, respectively) available in sizes 32AA to 46G. Then, there’s Stars Above, a 125-piece collection of pajama sets and pieces to just do nothing in, ranging from XS to 4X. Finally, there’s Colsie, a more trend-driven selection of loungewear and intimates, in sizes XS to 3X, aimed at the Gen-Z crowd. (Think Wild Fable, but for nighttime.)

In the age of splashy, size-inclusive intimates launches—Savage x Fenty comes to mind—Target’s latest release makes a lot of sense. The retailer serves a wide breadth of customers, and has worked to showcase diversity in its ad campaigns through casting and no retouching. Plus, like everything else at Target, these three new brands are all incredibly affordable: Nothing in Auden exceeds $22, while items in Colsie and Stars Above cap out at $29.99.

Previously, Target’s in-house intimates were divided in three separate lines: Xhilaration, Gilligan & O’Malley, and Ava & Viv. The largest bra size offered was a 46DDD, at Ava & Viv. Now, shoppers will be able to buy up to a 46G online, for the first time ever.

“We’re offering a more extensive size range than ever before so we can meet the needs of our guests,” says Jill Sando, Senior Vice President, General Merchandise Manager, Apparel and Accessories and Home at Target. As for where Target plans to go from this launch: “We’ll also continue to listen to our guests and make adjustments based on their feedback.”

More than simply offering an array of sizes at an accessible price, Target is emphasizing how customers can feel comfortable shopping and wearing undergarments. “We’re always looking for ways to make our brands more inclusive and celebratory of all body types,” Sando tells Glamour. “Within intimates and sleepwear specifically, what our guests are looking for has continued to evolve. Now, more than ever, they want to feel comfortable and confident in their own bodies.”

“Our team met with hundreds of women—ages 16-54 and of all body shapes and sizes—to have real conversations about their intimates: what’s working, what’s not and what can we do better,” Sando continues. “One thing they all had in common was the fact that finding the perfect bra is a struggle. They want more from their bra—they want to love it! With Auden in particular, we conducted bra fittings with hundreds of women to help us refine and inform the final assortment.”

On top of offering more options for shoppers, Target is hoping to refine the process of buying intimates in stores and online with Auden, through Bra Fit studios in retail locations and a “Find Your Fit” tool on its website. As with its apparel, the retailer’s intimates and sleepwear will be merchandised together, in a single section, in stores without a distinction between sizes.

You can expected more newness from Target in 2019: The retailer anticipates to have 25 owned brands available to shoppers by the end of the year. Auden, Stars Above, and Colsie are a pretty great start. All three lines will be shoppable in stores later this month and on Target.com on March 3. Glamour got an exclusive first look at the product—check out the first look at Target’s latest fashion brands, below.