The Best Wine Subscription Services

I’ve been trying to drink more wine for a while. I know this is a weird thing to admit when many are embarking on “Dry January” or otherwise making resolutions to do the opposite, but learning more about wine is perfectly in line with my goal for 2019: Be more Spanish.

I have a bit of a home field advantage. My family actually is from Spain. I go there once a year, over the summer. But every time I come home to New York, I end up feeling like I’m not quite Spanish enough: I don’t have an innate sense for making tortillas, I don’t take a middle-of-the-day-siesta (nor do I think I’d ever have the nonchalance to do it, even if I had the lifestyle), and I don’t drink wine in a way that makes my life better. As a native New Yorker, I’ve grown up with a knack for doing things that make my life harder—always running from point A to point B and getting immediately defensive when anyone gets in my way. No matter what I’m doing, whether that’s commuting or, yes, drinking wine, I’m rushing. That’s not a thing in Spain. There isn’t so much running, so much rushing, so much trying to get drunk at a breakneck pace. People there just are.

After much thinking, I’ve concluded that the most attainable way to achieve this Serene Spanish lifestyle is by drinking wine like they do: slowly, cheerfully, and frequently. Maybe with a tortilla.

Yes, I set this as a personal goal for 2019. But I’ve unintentionally been preparing for it for weeks. Instead of buying furniture at IKEA for my new apartment, I bought three large wooden cheese platters. Instead of picking up that dresser I really need, I acquired a hand-blown Sangria pitcher. (Some might argue that this is an aversion to decorating my sparse abode. To that, I say, why worry about making my empty apartment livable when I can relax with a glass of wine instead? Plus, I have a mattress.) There’s also been another fruitful development: I started dabbling in wine subscriptions.

Whether you’re interested in joining me on my quest to educate myself and make Wine January a thing, I’ve found that wine subscription services are incredibly helpful in sampling different varieties and makers. Plus it ensures that you’re always stocked without having to go farther than your mailbox. After much, ahem, testing, I’ve found that these five are my favorites. De nada.

Everything the Women on The Bachelor Request From the Grocery Store

Even those with just a passing knowledge of The Bachelor trivia can guess that the contestants give up their smart phones, email, and other forms of contact with the outside world while they’re filming the reality series. But I like to think that the withdrawal is made easier given they’re all there to find love…or at least a trip to Bachelor in Paradise and some Instagram sponsorships.

And there’s another surprising perk to being on the show: The ability to ask for anything they want at the grocery store and have it delivered by production. Imagine an unlimited supply of popcorn and wine—pretty great, right? Because of that, I’ve always been curious what is on each season’s grocery list so, before Colton Underwood hands out his first round of roses tonight, January 7, I asked the production team to share all the items the contestants requested.

The biggest surprise (to me, at least)? The sweets category is kind of lame. Even ice cream and frozen yogurt, something I’d consider necessary after a long day of talking about my “journey,” are nowhere to be found. Turns out, according to one of the producers, the women simply don’t ask for it. So, it’s not stocked at the house. If the women do get a craving, though, “sometimes we’ll do a special ice cream social night to kill time,” our source reveals. Contestants also don’t ask for desserts like cookies or candy because they’re already there. (Production assistants fill up jars with those treats as soon as the women move into the mansion.)

I also learned that in addition to ice cream socials and cookie jars, the producers throw pizza parties for the women while Colton’s off figuring out the meaning of love. So while you may not get to go on a helicopter ride with the bachelor, at least your carb cravings will be satisfied back home. And to be honest, that sounds like a better deal to me.

So what else is on the list? Take a look, below.

Fruits

  • Bananas

  • Strawberries

  • Blueberries

  • Raspberries

  • Pineapple

  • Apples

  • Grapes

  • Avocados

Vegetables

ERIKA

PHOTO: Rick Rowell

Erika brought her own bag of nuts to the mansion.

Meat & Eggs

  • Chicken breast

  • Ground turkey

  • Bacon

  • Turkey bacon

  • Sausage

  • Fish

  • Salmon

  • Shrimp

  • Beef jerky

  • Eggs

  • Egg whites

Dairy

  • Milk: non fat, soy, almond, and whole

  • Greek yogurt, plain and vanilla

  • Cottage cheese

  • Parmesan cheese

  • Cream cheese

Breads & Grains

  • White and wheat bread

  • Granola with mixed nuts

  • Oatmeal

  • Wheat tortillas

  • Instant rice

  • Breakfast potatoes

  • Pasta

  • Quinoa

The-Bachelor-Catherine-Colton-Underwood-wine-2019.jpg

PHOTO: Rick Rowell

Wine isn’t on the grocery list because it’s already well-stocked.

Condiments & Dressings

  • Ketchup

  • Mayonnaise

  • Mustard

  • Raw sugar

  • Olive oil

  • Salsa

  • Spaghetti sauce

  • Salad dressing

  • Peanut butter

  • Jelly

  • Pickles

Snacks & Dessert

Drinks

  • Orange juice

  • Ice tea

  • Coffee

  • Half & Half

  • Pomegranate Juice

The Bachelor premieres on ABC at 8 P.M. ET.

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A Culture Editor’s Impulse Buys: $200 of Potions, Swedish Sweets, and More

It wasn’t so much that I wanted to hibernate in December (and spend all the dollars on quilts, coats, and pillow forts that would have made that happen) as much as I wanted to slather. The weather on the East Coast has been temperate, but the palpable shift in season hit me like a Nor’easter storm. Then it made me crave moisture.

Let me just kick off this tale of ceramides with a disclaimer: I’m in fact not much of an impulse clothes shopper. As the staff of Glamour can attest, I show up to work each week in the same Everlane GoWeave pants, cast of Demylee, AYR, and Vince sweaters, and three Ganni dresses. (I like to repeat outfits so much that 90 percent of photos of me on social media look like I had them taken on the same afternoon.) But whatever restraint I have when it comes to clothes evaporates in the face of creams, tonics, serums, pastes, and potions of all manners. With a much-anticipated trip to Rome between Christmas and New Year’s, I managed to resist most non–skin care temptations this month. It is, I think, most chic to indulge on the other side of the Atlantic. But what did I give into? Overpriced oils from Aesop, creams from Ole Henriksen, and a cone of hot roasted chestnuts in half a dozen piazzas in Rome.

The Sweater I Snapped Up to Wear on the Banks of the Tiber: $138
I’m no influencer, but even I can’t resist the charms of a vacation outfit. I spotted this Demylee x J.Crew sweater while I browsed the retailer’s site in a doctor’s office. Do I know on some level that I look jaundiced in marigold? Yes. But could I resist this adorable balloon-sleeve sweater? No. Before I could overthink it, it was paid for and I had a full photoshoot planned in the shadow of the Pantheon.

The Clutch That I’m Convinced Will Get My Life in Order: $89
Listen, I could draw up a firm budget, become a batch-cooker, clean the bathroom, and organize all the books I own…or I could skip all that and just invest in this “Grand Slim Zip Clutch” that I found on sale at Of a Kind and have since become convinced will transform me into a woman who never forgets to stock up on toilet paper in one brilliant blue instant. I picked the clutch.

The Roll-on Oil That’s Supposed to Cure All That Ails Me: $31
I think we’ve established that I’m a sucker for serums and lotions of all kinds, but I have a particular affection for niche products. Think: Lip plumpers. Bubble masks. Balm cleansers. I had walked into Aesop to pick up a scrub for a friend (her Christmas gift) when I spied a tube labeled “Ginger Flight Therapy.” Packed with ginger, lavender, and geranium, it’s meant to be applied to “neck, temples, wrists, and abdomen in times of stress, nausea, or weariness.” It’s America in 2019! All times are stressful. I had to have it. Weeks later, I’m not quite sure if it’s fixed our democratic institutions or the persistent headache I just can’t kick, but it smells delicious.

The Book I’ve Bought for Three Different Friends: $16.80 x 4 = $67.20
I read Educated by Tara Westover in one sublime week in November and gifted it to four friends in December. It’s a beautiful memoir about Westover’s childhood in rural Idaho, her survivalist parents, and what we mean when we talk about the value of an “education.” I’ve never read another book like it and each time a friend has asked me for a recommendation since, I just order another one from Amazon and have it shipped to her front door.

A Banana-Laced Brightener (and Four More Cosmetic Enhancements I Became Convinced I Needed): $226.47
Until the second I purchased this cheerful Ole Henriksen “crème” I would have insisted I didn’t believe in the concept. I’ve tended to believe that creams aimed “fine lines” and “puffed lids” are nice-scented scams. Minuscule quantities of moisture, marked up at an outrageous price! I didn’t want to fall for them. But then I started to see this adorable cream heralded on websites, positioned on store shelves, and in friends’ medicine cabinets. (I peeked! I couldn’t help it.) It’s supposed to brighten dour complexions and make concealer glide over dark circles like a dream. I had to have it. So while I had intended just to restock the liquid liner I’ve used since high school (Stila’s Stay All Day), I somehow ended up at checkout with Sachajuan Scalp Shampoo, my ‘gram-bait Ole Henriksen cream, Tatcha Silk Canvas Protective Primer, Tatcha Water Cream, and a free sample of the Milk Makeup Blur Stick.

Boots for Inclement Weather That Are Also Purple: $280
I had stopped into Cole Haan on a whim when I spotted a pair of so-hideous-these-could-be-Prada boots. When a helpful clerk mentioned that the shoes were 100 percent waterproof, I had a sudden vision of me in inclement weather, unaffected! The boots do come in black, which is the version I first tried on. But then I went wild and made a split-second decision to become a different person; one who wears maroon. I was in and out of the store in 20 minutes.

All the Roasted Chestnuts I Could Stomach in Rome: $28.50
I don’t eat meat, which means street food options tend to be rather limited for me. Most of the time it’s a stale hot pretzel or bust. Then I landed in Rome and discovered the best portable sustenance—hot chestnuts. Roasted over coals and piled into paper cones, a stack of chestnuts goes for about five euro. A dozen or so of them are warm, delicious, and leave just enough room for another scoop of gelato an hour later. I picked them up close to half a dozen times on vacation and wish I’d done it even more. The perfect seasonal snack.

The Carry-on Bag I Was Forced to Check Against My Will: $96.80
Does a person need free will in order to impulse shop? If so, then scratch this one from the record. I had sailed onto the plane in New York with what let me just assert is a small suitcase. But when I tried to board in Rome, the woman at the gate insisted it wouldn’t fit in the overhead bins and compelled me to check it—for a steep fee! Cries that other people’s suitcases were at least as big as mine went unanswered. Reader, I checked it.

The Swedish Sweets I Bought My Boyfriend to Celebrate His New Job: $22
Some people recommend the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Others will enthuse over Bergdorf’s or some luxurious restaurant in TriBeCa. But the one place I recommend to all tourists is tucked into a small street in the West Village. It’s a modest storefront. It doesn’t shill fashionable coats or leather goods. It sells Swedish candies, and it’s the happiest place on earth. Please, I beg you: Go to Sockerbit if you’re ever in NYC. I passed it a mere 10 minutes after Jason called to tell me he’d just gotten offered a dream job. I had to go in. Now did I also have to purchase 32 ounces of peach skulls, watermelon sours, and caramel licorice? I don’t want to answer that question.

The Newsletter I Subscribed To Because the Title Alone Justified the Cost: $30
The brilliant writer Lyz Lenz (read this for a taste of her genius) launched a newsletter in December titled “Men Yell at Me.” Its elevator pitch? “Behind-the-scenes stories from a life of reporting and making men mad.” I know; I was sold in about three milliseconds too.

I paid $30 for an annual subscription and based on the first installments alone, I feel I can assure readers it’s a worthwhile investment. I laughed. I seethed. I felt so much righteous, white-hot rage I could have powered an electric stove. Join me!

Mattie Kahn is a senior editor at Glamour.

Chantecaille’s $85 Face Scrub Completely Transformed My Skin

No hate on Dry January, but why does the New Year have to be all about self-deprivation? After months of spending our time, energy, and money on everyone else, we’re ready to treat ourselves. Welcome to our weeklong series To Me, From Me.

My skin and I have always had a contentious relationship; two rounds of Accutane as a teen will do that to you. Even now that I’m well into my 30s and mostly blemish-free, I still have to be careful what I apply to my face. Over the last decade alone my skin has gone from oily to dry to combination and back again more times than we’ve had seasons of The Bachelor.

That’s why I’m hyper-vigilant when it comes to what I use on my face. Just because people swear something is “the best” doesn’t mean it’s the best for me. Or that the most expensive face cream on the market will give me J. Lo’s glow-from-within complexion (no, only J. Lo’s genes will do that). So when I find something that works for every season of my face, you better believe I’m sticking to it.

Now, before we get to what that product is, I need to lay the foundation for why I don’t mind spending so much money on it. I love makeup, and I’m not ashamed to say that pretty packaging will usually take me straight to the checkout line. But I also want whatever makeup I buy (and trust me, there’s a lot of it since I’m usually out at events or at award shows most evenings) to look amazing, do the job, and stay on without fading or melting. In order to do that, my skin has to be prepped and primed and ready to accept whatever liquid foundation or pigment I throw on it. If my skin is dry or flaky, or if my pores are clogged, then my makeup is just not going to look good no matter who makes it or how much it costs. And who wants to waste money because of that?

Perhaps that’s why I can justify (even though in all honesty, I still cringe) when I pay $85 for the best face scrub I’ve ever found: Chantecaille’s Bamboo & Hibiscus Exfoliating Cream.

PHOTO: Jessica Radloff

Chantecaille’s website says all the wonderful things that I would hope any product that costs almost $100 would do: it gently polishes, refines, and improves the appearance of your skin’s texture while delivering major hydration. It promises to minimize pores (thanks to glycolic acid), reduce fine lines (because of peptides), and improve my skin without causing irritation or redness (h/t to hibiscus flower, which contains high levels of pyruvic acid to help re-texturize skin). And you know what? It does. Of all the exfoliating scrubs, wipes, and creams that I’ve used in my 30-plus years on this earth, I’ve never found one that leaves my skin so baby soft and luxurious as this one. My makeup has never glided on so well—or stayed on all day. My bank account says crap, but my skin says thank you.

Yes, spending nearly $100 on a face scrub is probably insane to a lot of people. (I’m the daughter of a bankruptcy attorney, so he taught me well—maybe too well.) But I also look at it this way: it’s cheaper than weekly or bi-monthly facials. It’s also better than spending half that amount on a product that doesn’t quite do the job. And, I make sure to use it sparingly. You don’t have to use more than a dime-size amount to reap all the rewards, and I only use it three times a week. Plus, I love to support companies that are cruelty-free, like Chantecaille. All of their products are free of animal components, phthalates, sulphates, synthetic fragrances, and GMOs, among others. And it’s paraben-free. That’s important to me.

So, spending $85 on something that’s good for my skin, good for the environment, and frankly, good for my bank account (because as my dad tells me, money is meant to be spent if it’s for a smart reason) is a win. And while I can buy all the makeup I want, the skin on my face is the common denominator. And that deserves the ultimate treatment.

A Timeline of That Bizarre Rumor About Chrissy Metz and Alison Brie

Alison Brie and Chrissy Metz have nothing but love for each other after all those bizarre rumors from last night’s Golden Globes.

Don’t know what I’m talking about? Here’s quick recap. Outlets started reporting Sunday night that Metz called Brie a “b-tch” during a Facebook Live pre-show interview on the Globes red carpet. “Do you know a girl named Alison Brie?” one of the hosts asked Metz during the chat. “Do I?” the This Is Us star responded before mumbling something inaudible that the Internet heard as “She’s such a b-tch.”

Metz quickly took to Twitter and shut this story down, though. “It’s terribly unfortunate anyone would think much less run a story that was completely fabricated,” the actress wrote. “I adore Alison and would never say a bad word about her, or anyone! I sure hope she knows my heart.”

Several responses from Brie, Metz, and people in their inner circles followed shortly after this. Below, check out a timeline of quotes and posts about this incident that prove, once and for all, there’s no bad blood between Metz and Brie:

The original statement from Metz’s rep, Cheryl McLean. “Chrissy has nothing but admiration and respect for Alison and, frankly, every fellow actor who must wade through this much-too-common attempt to create a feud among colleagues,” the statement reads, according to USA Today. “This ‘story’ is a complete fabrication and deserves no further momentum.”

Metz’s first interview about what happened. “I’m so distraught and upset,” she told People. “I don’t speak about anyone like that, I don’t speak like that. I love Alison, I follow her. … When I was walking up they said, ‘Do you know Alison,’ and I said, ‘Oh boy, do I.’ I love her.”

This Is Us director Ken Olin comes to Metz’s defense. “Folks, I’ve known @ChrissyMetz for three years and I have NEVER heard her say a mean word about anyone. Move on,” he tweeted.

Brie’s initial response. “But why?,” the GLOW actress said to Vanity Fair writer and reporter Nicole Sperling when asked about the rumor. “I know her. I saw her on the carpet and I told her how beautiful she looked.”

And, then, her sweet post about Metz on Instagram Story. “Nothing but love for @chrissymetz!!” Brie posted, alongside a photo of herself and Metz. “Rumors can’t keep us down!”

Metz saying she and Brie texted about the situation. She told Us Weekly she and Brie have already cleared the air. “It’s unfortunate people want to say stuff that they don’t know is true or not. Alison and I obviously are friends,” Metz said. “She knows that I would never say something like that…It’s kind of terrible. So I’m glad that … I mean, I know the truth. If you actually listen to the video, I don’t say anything. It’s actually not me speaking about that, so it’s unfortunate.”

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‘Fiji Water Girl’ Kelleth Cuthbert on What It Feels Like to Become the First Meme of 2019

At this year’s Golden Globes, the biggest story wasn’t who was snubbed or which celebrities were dressed the best. (Although we do have thoughts on that.) No, the night was all about Kelleth Cuthbert, the 30-something woman caught photobombing several celebrities on the red carpet while holding a tray of Fiji Water. If you’ve looked at any red carpet photos from the 2019 Golden Globes, you’ve definitely seen her:

FIJI Water At The 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards

PHOTO: Stefanie Keenan

Dubbed “Fiji Water Girl,” the memes quickly came flooding in about the mysterious woman with the excellent photobombing skills. “If Bradley Cooper doesn’t bring the Fiji girl out on stage to perform ‘Shallow’ with him I’m turning this show off,” one new fan wrote on Twitter. “FYI: I have already written 200 pages of the Fiji Water girl’s inner monologue tonight,” said another. A star truly was born.

The memes were fun, but we had questions. Mainly, how did this all come together? And what’s Cuthbert’s story? What does it feel like to reach sudden Internet fame just for standing there?

We were able to track down Cuthbert after the red carpet, once she was off the clock and had changed out of her signature blue dress (to match Fiji Water’s bottle cap color, of course) and into jeans. Turns out, she’s a model and actress in her early thirties, married, and from Toronto but currently living in Los Angeles. Cuthbert used to be a social worker in Canada, specializing in mental health and addictions counseling, while modeling on the side. She was going to apply for grad school, but the modeling work was going so well she decided to take a year off and fully commit to it. She never went back.

In the years since, she’s done commercials, PSAs, short films, and worked modeling gigs at other award shows, but this is by far the biggest exposure. Cuthbert tells Glamour she’s confused and overwhelmed by all the attention, though she thinks it’s hilarious. “I do love a good meme, so I think it’s incredibly ironic and funny that I’m one now,” she says. “The first meme of 2019, apparently! My husband is laughing very hard about all of this.”

“This is something I would go viral for,” she jokes. “I feel like I’ve been photobombing people since I was a kid.”

Cuthbert says it took a while for her to realize something was happening. “A couple people came up to me and were like, ‘FIJI’s going viral,’” she says, but she assumed it was about all of the women there for Fiji. “I thought maybe I’m in the background of a couple shots.”

But more and more strangers started coming up to her to tell her she had become A Thing. Others asked for selfies (no celebrities though, womp). Hours later, when she finally went on break, she looked at her phone and saw hundreds of texts and DMs from people. Her Instagram following the morning of the Globes was 53,000; now, it’s at 76,300 at press time. “One of my print agents tagged me in a meme of myself,” she says, with a laugh. “I called my mom on my break, and she was already laughing when she picked up the phone. My parents are not very hip to things going on, so the fact that they had already received this information says a lot about how viral it already went.”

When Cuthbert woke up that morning, she certainly didn’t expect Internet stardom. This was just a side gig in between modeling and acting. She did her own hair and makeup before the event, though, “I wish now that I hadn’t chosen to sleep in a little longer. I thought, ‘I don’t need to put that much effort into myself…no one’s really going to see me.'” Yeahhh, that didn’t happen.

Cuthbert says that the report her moves were calculated isn’t true. “I never said that. I just stand where I’m told, wherever there is an opening.” Cuthbert tells us she simply moved from spot to spot and passed out water as she tried to keep a neutral-but-pleasant face. “Everyone has their work or event persona,” she explains. “You try to look at least somewhat pleasant and not have too much resting bitch face. You have to look somewhat friendly and happy to be engaging with people.” She wasn’t trying to photobomb everyone, she says: “Sometimes you’re caught between a lot of cameras, so there’s a lot of photographers at different angles. You’re just kind of trapped sometimes. See that’s the thing: I feel like I was looking away, but sometimes I was looking so I could move out of the way.”

FIJI Water At The 76th Annual Golden Globe Awards

PHOTO: Stefanie Keenan

So what’s next for Cuthbert now that she’s a star? First up, processing it all. “I haven’t even had the time to sit down and think about what could come from this, but truly anything would be exciting. I would love to get an acting role. That would be amazing.” Before all of this happened, her goals were to get a theatrical agent to shift away from modeling. More doors might be open now, but Cuthbert is taking it in stride. “I definitely think I’m ready for [the fame], but such is the nature of the Internet that these things just go by in a flash,” she says. “No one will find this funny in a week. We’ll see! I think all of this stuff is very fleeting. I enjoy the craft of acting, but all the other stuff around it is just noise. It’s light and fun, and I think it’s meant to be taken that way. Not too seriously.”

That said, “I saw a good [meme] of me that said, ‘Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.'”

10 Women on How to Get Rid of Frizzy Hair

Frizz. We all have it (no one is immune to damage or a change in humidity). While hair care brands have bombarded us with messaging that frizzy hair is the enemy, there is something to be said for embracing it. Frizz can be a halo or a crown, and it gives hair texture and life. While we love it a times, there are times when a girl just wants to be sleek too. For those days, we gathered intel from 10 women with various hair textures. Read on for the tips and tricks that changed their hair forever.

On Products

I have really wavy, frizzy, kind of curly hair. One of my friends suggested I start using Miss Jessie’s Quick Curls. After applying a palmful of the goop to my damp hair (I toss my hair upside down and scrunch it in), I twist locks of hair into spirals with my fingers and let it air-dry. Now I can have perfectly curly ringlets whenever I want, no frizz. But very important: You cannot achieve the same effect with a blow-dryer; you have to let it air-dry. If you don’t, the curls fall flat a lot faster and get really wonky. —Jacqueline Wladis, commerce manager

When I was younger, I, like everyone else, overstraightened my hair and created a mess of split ends. That’s when my mom told me to start embracing my natural wave. Now my daily look consists of brushing to detangle after I shower and a pump of this amazing oil from Kérastase that I work into the ends of my wet hair before bed. The result is silky, smooth hair in the morning. Best of all—no damage. —Alexa De Paulis, junior designer

My hair is super overprocessed from heat damage, and it’s hard to find a deep conditioning hair mask that continues to work. This year I got my hands on the Gisou Honey Infused Hair Mask, and it diminishes frizz, makes my hair so soft, and helps smooth the damaged ends. I like to leave it in for a good 10 minutes once or twice a week. My hair has become so much more lustrous! —Azadeh Valanejad, video producer

Whenever I try to do a specific hairstyle, whether it be braids, an updo, or just something fun with hair accessories, I find my hair never stays in place and can appear frizzy with lots of flyaways. When that’s the case, I use this Sachajuan hair paste which completely changed my life and is one of my absolute favorite hair products to date. It helps keep my hair in place without looking sticky or greasy and can be used on wet or dry hair, which makes it ideal for styling. —Tara Gonzalez, associate commerce editor

On Drying

If you don’t invest in a gold-standard hair-dryer, you’re not serious about taming frizz. Over the years I’ve realized professional hair-dryers are like sports cars: crafted with high-velocity engines and top-of-the-line parts and performance-driven design and features. Do your homework and be willing to spend the money. Coupled with the right high-quality brush for your texture, a professional-grade dryer is the best way to defrizz. The two made-in-Italy brands I use and trust: Solano and Twin Turbo. —Perrie Samotin, deputy digital director

If you apply your product to hair that is the slightest bit dry, your product will not evenly saturate, and you will be left with frizzy, undefined curls. To avoid this mistake, skip the towel turban, keep a spray bottle on hand, and start applying your styling product on super-wet hair. A great rule of thumb to follow is if it looks frizzy when its wet, it’s going to be frizzy when it’s dry. I personally like to comb through a leave-in conditioner, then rake in a curl cream with my fingers, and lastly, scrunch with a liquid gel. This provides moisture, enhances curl definition, and holds the style so your curls stay defined for days. —Melissa Guido, hairstylist and curl expert

Finish a blow-dry with a blast of cold air. It makes all the difference in achieving a smoother finish, even with straight hair, and especially when you rough-dry it with your hands as I do (a lazy woman’s approach but it works for me). A lot of hair-dryers have a cool setting; I find the one on my Harry Josh model extra chilly and effective. I blast it for 15 seconds at the end and I’m done. —Ying Chu, executive beauty director

Brush your hair in place while in the shower and try to mess with it as little as possible afterward to avoid frizz. Also, blow-dry with a diffuser attachment on a low heat/low power setting. But do it with your head upside down to achieve maximum volume. —Toni Macaroni, model

On Unexpected Tips

I try to blow out my frizzy, wavy hair only once a week, but maintaining sleek waves throughout the whole week has proved to be impossible. That was until I was introduced to silk pillowcases and scrunchies. They changed my life. I twist my hair into a high bun and secure it with a silk scrunchie before bed—the fabric doesn’t crease my hair, especially when I’m also laying my head on a slippery silk pillowcase. In the morning I take my hair down, mist my roots with dry shampoo and I’m good to go—no frizz at all. —Jillian Ruffo, beauty writer

My number-one tip for preventing frizz: Keep your hands out of your curls! Constantly touching your hair will bring all the frizz you try to avoid. —Ashly Rodriguez, hair blogger

Whenever I have frizz, which is on a daily basis, I love to take my L’Oréal Elnett Satin Strong Hairspray and spray it on a comb. After spraying, I lightly brush through the top of my hair to set it in place. On top of that, I wish this hairspray came in a perfume—I love the scent! And it holds my frizz down for the entire day. —Michaela Podolsky, influencer

What Outlander Finally Gets Right About Rape This Season

Note: This post contains spoilers about the most recent episode of Outlander. It also may be triggering.

Readers of the Outlander books had whispered it was coming this season, and then it happened: Brianna, daughter of Jamie and Claire, was brutally attacked by new villain Stephen Bonnet. It happens after Brianna spots Claire’s wedding ring from Jamie (a notable change from the books) on Bonnet’s gambling table and tries to haggle with him for it. Bonnet isn’t in the mood; he thinks all things are his for the taking. So he rapes her in a back room of the tavern, while a room full of men sit outside and ignore her screams. And laugh. And drink. And even neatly place Brianna’s boots—which Bonnet ripped off her feet and cast aside—beside the door as if she were a house guest.

The scene reminded me of Christine Blasey Ford’s devastating testimony on Capitol Hill, when she told the Senate Judiciary Committee the one thing she will never forget about the night at that party with Brett Kavanaugh: “Indelible … is the laughter, the uproarious laughter between the two . . . I was underneath one of them while the two laughed.”

“There is a belief that rape equals penetration,” Kilbourne says. “If it isn’t penetration, it isn’t rape, and therefore it doesn’t matter.”

It’s another moment when the 18th-century storyline feels shockingly relevant in 2019, and it’s a turning point in the season. Yes, the show is known for its hot, consensual sex between Jamie and Claire, but the plot is often driven forward by rape and sexual assault. There’s Jamie’s torture and rape by Jack Randall at Wentworth prison. There’s the off-camera rape of Fergus (again by Randall) at a brothel in Paris. The drugging and rape of young Ian by the Bakra, also known as Geilles Duncan, after she steps out of a pool of blood. All men, all raped—and these male characters get to process and deal with their assaults, Jamie most of all.

“Most male rape victims don’t talk about it,” says Jean Kilbourne, creator of the Killing Us Softly film series, media critic, and feminist activist who has studied how women are portrayed in advertising and media. “They have to be encouraged to come forward, the shame and stigma is so deep.” Kilbourne says Jamie’s reaction—how he doesn’t just shrug off the trauma and isn’t healed immediately—is the most accurate portrayal of real life. We see him grapple with depression and suicide. Importantly, Claire doesn’t shun him or tell him everything’s fine; instead she uses varying tactics to get him to open up about the trauma. (“We’ve barely even talked about it,” she says during a fight one night in Paris. “Tell me, goddamn it. Talk to me, make me understand.”) Once Jamie does, the couple take a major step toward healing.

In Season 2, Fergus also finds some solace in confiding to Claire, who emphasizes the rape was not his fault. In Season 4, when Ian has a flashback about his assault that triggers a panic attack, it’s Jamie who counsels him. And in the process debunks a myth about male rape as he explains to Ian that it’s possible to have an erection and still be against a man’s will: “You have a conscience, your cock does not.” Kilbourne can’t recall a similar scene between two men onscreen. “People understand that a man can be anally penetrated,” says Kilbourne, “But if he has an erection, they think, Doesn’t that mean it was consensual? It’s hard for people to imagine.”

These are breakthrough moments, but Claire has never found this kind of support. After nearly being raped by Jack Randall after she goes through the stones, Claire has no time to cope; she keeps running. When English officers interrupt Jamie and Claire’s tryst in the glade—the haze of the attack leaving viewers unsure of the severity of the assault—Claire goes into shock, but it seems to be more about the blood on her hands from killing the officer than her own violation. Next she’s assaulted by Randall again, dress torn open, his knife threatening to cut off her nipple. Jamie comes to her aid, but afterward there is no discussion of what happened. The scenes are a subtle reminder of what our culture says to women about assault: It’s nothing. Brush yourself off and move on. It wasn’t really rape.

Outlander Season 4 2018

PHOTO: Aimee Spinks

Brianna and Claire share a moment.

Kilbourne suggests there are a few reasons the story has played out this way. “There is a belief that rape equals penetration,” Kilbourne says. “If it isn’t penetration, it isn’t rape, and therefore it doesn’t matter. We saw this play out in Blasey Ford’s testimony. People would comment, He didn’t rape her, so what’s the big deal? Why is she bringing this up now?”

But Kilbourne also sees something of a Bechdel test when rape is used as a storyline: Who can a woman depend on after an assault? “Does Claire have a female friend?” she points out. By and large Claire does does not. Mrs. Fitzgibbons isn’t someone she can trust enough upon arrival at Castle Leoch. There’s the hope of friendship with Geilles, but that idea unravels faster than Father Wakefield rushes to burn a witch at the stake. In Paris, Louise is mostly preoccupied by gossip (though she does redeem herself when Faith is stillborn). And this season Adawehi is brutally murdered just as her relationship with Claire begins to blossom. Notably, when Mary Hawkins was raped, Claire is a friend she can turn to, offering medical care and comfort and telling Mary, “It’s not your fault.”

Which brings us back to this season’s story arc. Brianna, immediately after the rape, does have someone to turn to: Her new maid Lizzie immediately offers aid. But despite her torn dress and bloody petticoat and bruises, Brianna refuses to speak of the trauma. “You have my hand here, and my ear if you need it,” Lizzie persists. Like so many women who delay telling anyone about an assault, Brianna doesn’t reveal what happened, not until she learns she’s pregnant and finally tells Claire. That’s two people in her corner. And once Claire shares the story with Jamie, Brianna has a third ally.

“You have my hand here, and my ear if you need it,” Brianna’s maid, Lizzie, says immediately after the assault.

This week, in a heart-to-heart with her father, Brianna suggests she could have prevented the attack: “I could have fought. I could have tried harder.” Jamie, in turn, gives voice to the words that make every survivor hesitate to come forward. “You’re right, you could’ve. Unless of course you wanted it,” he says. “I’m thinking you’re maybe playing with the truth a bit, lass. Maybe it wasn’t rape at all. Maybe you took a liking to the lad, and made the story up after… Maybe you enjoyed it.”

It’s enough to enrage Brianna, who tries to strike him, until Jamie grabs her by the neck and viscerally shows how she couldn’t have stopped Bonnet and survived. “Do you think yourself a coward because you couldn’t fight off a wolf with your bare hands?” Jamie says. “It took courage not to fight. If you did he would have killed you.” The scene doesn’t end there. “Did you fight back, against Jack Randall?” Brianna asks. And laid bare there is what hurts most: the shame. “I gave my word not to fight, for your mother’s life,” Jamie replies. “I would do the same again.”

Outlander Season 4 2018

PHOTO: Aimee Spinks courtesy of Starz

Jamie counsels his daughter Brianna.

Says Kilbourne: “Men hear all the time, Why didn’t you fight back?” Rape is about power, physical and psychological, she reminds. Randall gets off on his power over Jamie. Bonnet shows his upper hand when “pays” Brianna with her mother’s ring. Put another way, says Kilbourne, they each pull off “a total mindfuck.”

With only two episodes left in the season, there are hints that Roger, once he’s reunited with Brianna, will also line up in her corner (though perhaps not right away if the child is not his?). But Brianna is finally a female character who will be given the time and support she needs to heal.

“It’s useful to have a show like this illustrate these issues—even if they don’t get it entirely right,” says Kilbourne. “We need to see that men can be raped. That it’s important to talk about rape. That assault, of all kinds, can have lasting effects. It helps break down the mythology of it all.” And most of all, episodes like these are a reminder to all of us to be a friend. To be there unconditionally when a survivor is ready to open up. To listen. To believe.

Wendy Naugle is Glamour’s executive editor. Follow her on Twitter @WendyNaugle.

The Best Advice For Frizzy Hair

Frizz. We all have it (no one is immune to damage or a change in humidity). While hair care brands have bombarded us with messaging that frizzy hair is the enemy, there is something to be said for embracing it. Frizz can be a halo or a crown, and it gives hair texture and life. While we love it a times, there are times when a girl just wants to be sleek, too. For those days we gathered intel from 10 women with various hair textures. Read on for the tips and tricks that changed their hair forever.

On Products

I have really wavy, frizzy, kind-of-curly hair. One of my friends suggested I start using Miss Jessie’s Quick Curls. After applying a palmful of the goop to my damp hair (I toss my hair upside down and scrunch it in), I twist locks of hair into spirals with my fingers and let it air-dry. Now I can have perfectly curly ringlets whenever I want, no frizz. But very important: You cannot achieve the same effect with a blow-dryer, you have to let it air-dry. If you don’t, the curls fall flat a lot faster and get really wonky. —Jacqueline Wladis, commerce manager

When I was younger, I, like everyone else, over-straightened my hair and created a mess of split ends. That’s when my mom told me to start embracing my natural wave. Now my daily look consists of brushing to detangle after I shower and a pump of this amazing oil from Kérastase that I work into the ends of my wet hair before bed. The result is silky, smooth hair in the morning. Best of all—no damage. —Alexa De Paulis, junior designer

My hair is super over-processed from heat damage and it’s hard to find a deep conditioning hair mask that continues to work. This year I got my hands on the Gisou Honey Infused Hair Mask and it diminishes frizz, makes my hair sooo soft, and helps smooth the damaged ends. I like to leave it in for a good 10 minutes once or twice a week. My hair has become so much more lustrous! —Azadeh Valanejad, video producer

Whenever I try to do a specific hairstyle, whether it be braids, an updo or just something fun with hair accessories, I find my hair never stays in place and can appear frizzy with lots of flyaways. When that’s the case I use this Sachajuan hair paste which completely changed my life and is one of my absolute favorite hair products to date. It helps keep my hair in place without looking sticky or greasy and can be used on wet or dry hair which makes it ideal for styling. —Tara Gonzalez, associate commerce editor

On Drying

If you don’t invest in a gold-standard hairdryer, you’re not serious about taming frizz. Over the years, I’ve realized professional hairdryers are like sports cars: crafted with high-velocity engines and top of the line parts and performance-driven design and features. Do your homework and be willing to spend the money. Coupled with the right high-quality brush for your texture, a professional-grade dryer is the best way to defrizz. The two made-in-Italy brands I use and trust: Solano and Twin Turbo. —Perrie Samotin, deputy digital director

If you apply your product to hair that is the slightest bit dry, your product will not evenly saturate and you will be left with frizzy, undefined curls. To avoid this mistake, skip the towel turban, keep a spray bottle on hand, and start applying your styling product on super wet hair. A great rule of thumb to follow is if it looks frizzy when its wet, it’s going to be frizzy when it’s dry. I personally like to comb through a leave-in conditioner, then rake in a curl cream with my fingers, and lastly, scrunch with a liquid gel. This provides moisture, enhances curl definition, and holds the style so your curls stay defined for days. — Melissa Guido, hair stylist and curl expert

Finish a blow-dry with a blast of cold air. It makes all the difference in achieving a smoother finish, even with straight hair, and especially when you rough-dry it with your hands as I do (a lazy woman’s approach but it works for me). A lot of hair-dryers have a cool setting; I find the one on my Harry Josh model extra chilly and effective. I blast it for 15 seconds at the end and I’m done. —Ying Chu, executive beauty director

Brush your hair in place while in the shower and try to mess with it as little as possible afterwards to avoid frizz. Also, blow dry with a diffuser attachment on a low heat/low power setting. But do it with your head upside down to achieve maximum volume. —Toni Macaroni, model

On Unexpected Tips

I try to blow out my frizzy, wavy hair only once a week, but maintaining sleek waves throughout the whole week has proven to be impossible. That was until I was introduced to silk pillowcases and scrunchies. They changed my life. I twist my hair into a high bun and secure it with a silk scrunchie before bed—the fabric doesn’t crease my hair, especially when I’m also laying my head on a slippery silk pillowcase. In the morning, I take my hair down, mist my roots with dry shampoo and I’m good to go—no frizz at all. —Jillian Ruffo, Beauty Writer

My number-one tip for preventing frizz: Keep your hands out of your curls! Constantly touching your hair will bring all the frizz you try to avoid. —Ashly Rodriguez, hair blogger

Whenever I have frizz, which is on a daily basis, I love to take my L’Oréal Elnett Satin Strong Hairspray and spray it on a comb. After spraying I lightly brush through the top of my hair to set it in place. On top of that, I wish this hairspray came in a perfume—I love the scent! And it holds my frizz down for the entire day. —Michaela Podolsky, influencer

Every Drugstore Makeup Steal Celebrities Wore at the 2019 Golden Globes

We don’t have to tell you that award shows are fancy affairs. As one of Hollywood’s greatest traditions, it’s the one time of the year you can expect celebrities to really do it big. After all, we’re talking about black-tie parties that give away vouchers for $1,900 vampire breast lifts and luxury TP in their gift bags. So it’d be unsurprising if the beauty products too were accessible to only the 1 percent, right?

While that might the case for “penis facials,” many of the hair, makeup, and skin care products glam squads use during the awards circuit are refreshingly affordable. Brands often broker deals with makeup artists and hairstylists to use their newest launches for red carpet looks. And why not? As the “who are you wearing” question proves, celebrities on the red carpet are essentially walking billboards. Plus, this is also good news for the rest of us. We might not be able to drop thousands on a designer gown, but $10 on a foundation Gina Rodriguez looked incredible in all night? You bet we want—and can have—that.

Ahead, keep tabs as we track all the best drugstore beauty finds from awards season. Something tells us you’re going to want to make a pit stop on the way home from work tomorrow.