The Surprisingly Cathartic Process Of Packing Up Your Life

How do you pack up your life to start over?

Okay, “to start over” sounds dramatic—like I endured a devastating breakup, lost a loved one, or got laid off. But that’s the narrative that typically surrounds these things. And that’s the question I asked myself while staring into two very large, very empty suitcases a week before moving to live abroad.

For me, the reason was a mix of career and burnout combined with a little—nay, a lot of—restlessness. I wanted a new experience in a new place, even if temporarily, and I needed clothes (and courage, and money) to get there. But first, I needed to pack.

Before I folded or made any sort of edit of my 20-plus years of accumulated stuff, I turned to Google for help, hoping some wayward millennial had blogged about the same conundrum I found myself in. I read every “how to” article I could find on the topic. Here’s the gist of what the Internet tells you to keep in mind: the location and weather during the time you’ll be there (London, and who knows); how long you’d be staying (at least six months); he weight limitations of the airline you’re flying (not heavy enough). These were all great suggestions, but not super helpful in figuring out what I would need—and want—when I took a one-way flight to brand-new country.

Normally, I’m that friend who brings 10 different outfits for a five-day trip, because you never know what might happen. But this was different. For some reason, getting ready for a six-month journey versus a week-long vacation, something I’d never experienced before, brought out a different side of me. I like to joke to people that I blacked out while packing—because, when it came down to it, I ended up with a somewhat impractical, Kondo-esque approach: I packed what brought me joy. Which, it turns out, isn’t all that much.

FatCamera

Both of my suitcases were overweight—not because of clothes (they only take up a third of the armoire acting as my closet in London), but because of my excessive number of beauty products (a story for another day). This isn’t typical behavior for me. This kind of pared-down wardrobe would make me anxious. But by committing to a few beloved pieces, I gained a clearer picture of what I actually want to wear.

I realized that a T-shirt I can wear multiple ways is much more useful to me than a trendy party dress I’ll wear a handful of times. That’s not to say trendy dresses aren’t necessary—I packed the trendy dress for London, just in case. But when you’re forced to edit down, you realize that the “some day” outfits aren’t as important.

The Best Female Stand-up Comedians’ Specials to Watch Right Now

“I was once told that I couldn’t do a show because the ‘woman’s spot’ was filled for the show, and that’s a show with about seven, eight, or nine comedians on it,” comedian Emily McWinter told Glamour for a video about the sexist and misogynistic culture that exists in comedy. “They reserve one spot for a woman, and if there’s two deserving candidates, one just can’t be on the show.”

That’s just one of many examples detailing how this boys’ club results in male performers’ voices consistently being elevated over females’. Of course, the road to fixing this issue is long, but one thing you can do right now to help is give your time and money to female stand-up comedians. Watching these 14 specials, below, is a great place to start.

Tiffany Haddish Presents: They Ready (2019) Haddish hosts this new comedy special in which she gives us some of her own genius comedy as well as shining a light on six of her favorite up-and-coming comedians. If Tiffany Haddish thinks Chaunté Wayans, April Macie, Tracey Ashley, Aida Rodriguez, Flame Monroe, and Marlo Williams are hilarious, then we’re game to listen. Streaming on Netflix.

Katherine Ryan: Glitter Room (2019) Ryan’s latest comedy special is pure gold—or should we say glitter. She tackles several different topics throughout her hour-long set, including the Kardashians’ “revenge bodies,” school bullies, and raising, as she calls her, a “very fancy” child. Streaming on Netflix

Amy Schumer: Growing (2019) Of course Schumer has one of the most honest, hilarious specials about pregnancy in comedy history. “I didn’t know that being pregnant could be really hard,” she says at one point. “You bitches all lie about it.” And that’s all you need to know before tuning in. Steaming on Netflix

Ali Wong: Baby Cobra (2016) Wong’s brand of sharp, deadpan humor is perhaps best encapsulated in Baby Cobra. which she filmed for Netflix when she was seven months pregnant. She covers that, plus other personal topics like sex, hoarding, and feminism. If you’re on the fence about watching, just watch the clip, below, in which Wong delightfully tears into the double standard surrounding male and female comedians after they have kids. Streaming on Netflix

Amy Schumer: The Leather Special (2017) Schumer’s frank and unapologetic opinions on sex and relationships catapulted her to the center of the comedy universe in early 2015. Not long after this she released her first feature film, Trainwreck, and followed this up with Snatched, costarring Goldie Hawn, in 2017. All these experiences fuel Schumer’s Leather Special for Netflix. It combines the raunchy humor that classic Schumer fans love, along with post-fame pop-culture commentary that keeps things interesting. Streaming on Netflix

Anjelah Johnson: Not Fancy (2015) Johnson’s comedy career spans over a decade, starting with MADtv, where she developed iconic characters like Bon Qui Qui, and moving on to her own stand-up specials and film appearances. Her 2015 special, Not Fancy, combines her signature brash style with fresh new stories. Her “I will cut you” bit, below, sums things up beautifully. Streaming on Netflix

Christina P: Mother Inferior (2017) Christina Pazsitzky takes on motherhood specifically with this refreshingly candid special, addressing issues like giving birth, getting older, and her own personal childhood. “It’s kind of crazy when you think about it: how much it takes to make every one of you,” Pazsitzky says to her audience at one point. “And I gotta tell you: Most of you, not worth it.” Drag me, please. Streaming on Netflix

Cristela Alonzo: Lower Classy (2017) Alonzo gives her goofy, sarcastic take on everything from rooting for a losing sports team to Latino stereotypes to her relationship with her mother. If you miss Alonzo’s gone-too-soon sitcom, Cristela, then definitely check this out. Many of the elements that made her show funny are in this stand-up special. Streaming on Netflix

Tig Notaro, Boyish Girl Interrupted (2015) Notaro’s dry sarcasm and minimalist style is a welcome reprieve from the slew of stand-up comedians who think “bigger is better.” On Boyish Girl Interrupted, she comments (with her signature deadpan) on a variety of subjects, including her breast-cancer diagnosis and the death of her mother. The latter topic was the subject of Notaro’s amazing but short-lived Amazon show One, Mississippi. Available on HBO Go and HBO Now

Iliza Shlesinger: Confirmed Kills (2016): Shlesinger may take a few unwarranted jabs at beloved Disney princess, Ariel, in this special, but that aside it’s a hysterically good time, covering dating, family dynamics, and everything in between. Only watch the trailer, below, if you want to know the context of “confirmed kills” before checking out this special. Streaming on Netflix

Leslie Jones: Problem Child (2009) Before she was slaying our lives weekly on Saturday Night Live, Jones was a stand-up comedian refining her signature irreverent style. Her pre-SNL special Problem Child sums up that aesthetic to a tee, diving deep into sexual politics in a hilarious, unfiltered way. Streaming on Youtube and Google Play

Joan Rivers: Don’t Start With Me (2012) Rivers’ brand of politically incorrect pop-culture humor isn’t for everyone. At times it’s even downright offensive, but the late comedian’s icon status makes Don’t Start With Me worth a watch. Streaming on YouTube

Jen Kirkman: Just Keep Livin’ (2017) Women’s lives in 2017–2018 take center stage on Just Keep Livin’, with Kirkman riffing on relevant issues like catcalling and male feminists. Don’t worry, though: She does squeeze in some deliciously whacky stories as well, like the time she thought her Italian tour guide was a ghost. Streaming on Netflix

Katherine Ryan: In Trouble (2017) Ryan makes not one but two Taylor Swift jokes during her stand-up special. They’re good-natured, though, so the Swifties can lower their pitchforks. Ryan’s incredibly self-deprecating, as well, which makes for some very funny stand-up. Streaming on Netflix

Kathy Griffin: Balls of Steel (2012) Griffin’s entire schtick is making fun of celebrities, so only the most ravenous pop-culture consumers should watch her stand-up. On Balls of Steel, she takes (playful) shots at all your faves, including Britney Spears, Taylor Swift, and Paul Abdul. Available for rent on Amazon

The Best Female Stand-Up Comedian Specials to Watch Right Now

“I was once told that I couldn’t do a show because the ‘woman’s spot’ was filled for the show, and that’s a show with about seven, eight, or nine comedians on it,” comedian Emily McWinter told Glamour for a video about the sexist and misogynistic culture that exists in comedy. “They reserve one spot for a woman, and if there’s two deserving candidates, one just can’t be on the show.”

That’s just one of many examples detailing how this boys’ club results in male performers’ voices consistently being elevated over females’. Of course, the road to fixing this issue is long, but one thing you can do right now to help is give your time and money to female stand-up comedians. Watching these 14 specials, below, is a great place to start.

Tiffany Haddish Presents: They Ready (2019) Haddish hosts this new comedy special in which she gives us some of her own genius comedy as well as shines a light on six of her favorite up-and-coming comedians. If Tiffany Haddish thinks Chaunté Wayans, April Macie, Tracey Ashley, Aida Rodriguez, Flame Monroe, and Marlo Williams are hilarious, then we’re game to listen. Streaming on Netflix.

Katherine Ryan: Glitter Room (2019) Ryan’s latest comedy special is pure gold—or should we say glitter. She tackles several different topics throughout her hour-long set, including the Kardashians’ “revenge bodies,” school bullies, and raising, as she calls her, a “very fancy” child. Streaming on Netflix

Amy Schumer: Growing (2019) Of course Schumer has one of the most honest, hilarious specials about pregnancy in comedy history. “I didn’t know that being pregnant could be really hard,” she says at one point. “You bitches all lie about it.” And that’s all you need to know before tuning in. Steaming on Netflix

Ali Wong: Baby Cobra (2016) Wong’s brand of sharp, deadpan humor is perhaps best encapsulated in Baby Cobra. which she filmed for Netflix when she was seven months pregnant. She covers that, plus other personal topics like sex, hoarding, and feminism. If you’re on the fence about watching, just watch the clip, below, in which Wong delightfully tears into the double standard surrounding male and female comedians after they have kids. Streaming on Netflix

Amy Schumer: The Leather Special (2017) Schumer’s frank and unapologetic opinions on sex and relationships catapulted her to the center of the comedy universe in early 2015. Not long after this she released her first feature film, Trainwreck, and followed this up with Snatched, costarring Goldie Hawn, in 2017. All these experiences fuel Schumer’s Leather Special for Netflix. It combines the raunchy humor that classic Schumer fans love, along with postfame pop-culture commentary that keeps things interesting. Streaming on Netflix

Anjelah Johnson: Not Fancy (2015) Johnson’s comedy career spans over a decade, starting with MADtv, where she developed iconic characters like Bon Qui Qui, and moving on to her own stand-up specials and film appearances. Her 2015 special, Not Fancy, combines her signature brash style with fresh new stories. Her “I will cut you” bit, below, sums things up beautifully. Streaming on Netflix

Christina P: Mother Inferior (2017) Christina Pazsitzky takes on motherhood specifically with this refreshingly candid special, addressing issues like giving birth, getting older, and her own personal childhood. “It’s kind of crazy when you think about it: how much it takes to make every one of you,” Pazsitzky says to her audience at one point. “And I gotta tell you: Most of you, not worth it.” Drag me, please. Streaming on Netflix

Cristela Alonzo: Lower Classy (2017) Alonzo gives her goofy, sarcastic take on everything from rooting for a losing sports team to Latino stereotypes to her relationship with her mother. If you miss Alonzo’s gone-too-soon sitcom, Cristela, then definitely check this out. Many of the elements that made her show funny are in this stand-up special. Streaming on Netflix

Tig Notaro, Boyish Girl Interrupted (2015) Notaro’s dry sarcasm and minimalist style is a welcome reprieve from the slew of stand-up comedians who think “bigger is better.” On Boyish Girl Interrupted, she comments (with her signature deadpan) on a variety of subjects, including her breast-cancer diagnosis and the death of her mother. The latter topic was the subject of Notaro’s amazing but short-lived Amazon show One, Mississippi. Available on HBO Go and HBO Now

Iliza Shlesinger: Confirmed Kills (2016) Shlesinger may take a few unwarranted jabs at beloved Disney princess, Ariel, in this special, but that aside it’s a hysterically good time, covering dating, family dynamics, and everything in between. Only watch the trailer, below, if you want to know the context of “confirmed kills” before checking out this special. Streaming on Netflix

Leslie Jones: Problem Child (2009) Before she was slaying our lives weekly on Saturday Night Live, Jones was a stand-up comedian refining her signature irreverent style. Her pre-SNL special Problem Child sums up that aesthetic to a tee, diving deep into sexual politics in a hilarious, unfiltered way. Streaming on Youtube and Google Play

Joan Rivers: Don’t Start With Me (2012) Rivers’ brand of politically incorrect pop-culture humor isn’t for everyone. At times it’s even downright offensive, but the late comedian’s icon status makes Don’t Start With Me worth a watch. Streaming on YouTube

Jen Kirkman: Just Keep Livin’ (2017) Women’s lives in 2017 and 2018 take center stage on Just Keep Livin’, with Kirkman riffing on relevant issues like catcalling and male feminists. Don’t worry, though: She does squeeze in some deliciously wacky stories as well, like the time she thought her Italian tour guide was a ghost. Streaming on Netflix

Katherine Ryan: In Trouble (2017) Ryan makes not one but two Taylor Swift jokes during her stand-up special. They’re good-natured, though, so the Swifties can lower their pitchforks. Ryan’s incredibly self-deprecating, as well, which makes for some very funny stand-up. Streaming on Netflix

Kathy Griffin: Balls of Steel (2012) Griffin’s entire shtick is making fun of celebrities, so only the most ravenous pop-culture consumers should watch her stand-up. On Balls of Steel, she takes (playful) shots at all your faves, including Britney Spears, Taylor Swift, and Paul Abdul. Available for rent on Amazon

5 Fall 2019 Shoe Trends to Shop Right Now

Unlike the strappy heels and lace-up sandals you live in during the summer, fall footwear is all about comfort, durability, and ease. You want these shoes to live in your closet for years, so you look for styles that are timeless, yes, but also interesting. (You don’t want to get bored of those boots you invested in after a single season.) That’s where the trends come in, to elevate the tried-and-true silhouettes and make them feel special year after year. Whether it’s Western details updating the classic ankle boot or animal prints jazzing up combat shoes, there’s something for every shopper. Ahead, shop the five shoe trends you’re going to see everywhere this fall.

Cate Blanchett on ‘Where’d You Go, Bernadette’: ‘There Is No Such Thing as a Perfect Parent’

“It’s a complete oxymoron that we’ve all been [told] as women, the ‘perfect mother.’ There is no such thing as a perfect parent. You even still have conversations about mothers’ having to be sympathetic, or not do certain things,” Cate Blanchett tells me over the phone while we’re discussing her latest film, Richard Linklater’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette, in which she stars as Bernadette Fox, a character who is anything but a “perfect mother.”

For the uninitiated (i.e. those who haven’t read Maria Semple’s beloved 2012 novel that the movie’s based on), Bernadette is a former architect turned agoraphobic recluse. And though she’s criticized by the other mothers at her daughter’s expensive private school in suburban Seattle—including Audrey (Kristen Wiig), the queen of the PTA and Bernadette’s public enemy number one—it doesn’t matter as long as she’s still completely adored by her daughter, Bee (Emma Nelson).

But then, Bernadette’s life is turned upside down after Bee, who is about leave for boarding school, reveals her one wish before she goes: to take a family trip to Antartica. Bernadette agrees at first, then becomes more and more anxious about the impending journey. Eventually, it becomes her undoing. Halfway through the story, Bernadette disappears. Vanishes without a trace. To some—many, actually—that would be an unforgivable thing to do to your family. Bee, however, is the only one who understands her mother’s need to escape.

Bernadette (Cate Blanchett) with her daughter, Bee (Emma Nelson), during a chaotic school pickup.

WILSON WEBB/ANNAPURNA PICTURES

“It’s traditionally seen as being a monumentally unsympathetic thing for a mother to do,” Blanchett, a mother of four, says of Bernadette’s decision to leave.”But you have to empathetically get inside Bernadette—who can often be quite an alienating character—in order to understand. She has experienced massive creative failure, and she’s run away from it. All of her stuff has come up, and she’s got to deal with it in order to move onto the next chapter of her life.”

Playing Bernadette as a fully-formed character was somewhat of a challenge for Blanchett. In the book, the story is told through a series of documents, transcripts, and memos, allowing readers to understand Bernadette’s internal thoughts through her emails and correspondence. In the film, however, you’re watching Bernadette write these documents. Blanchett considered it her job to bring emotion to these moments as well as figure out the logistics. “When she sends an email, what is she actually doing when she sends it?” Blanchett explains. “[Because] it’s a lot of pain and grief that Bernadette is masking underneath her acerbic, relentlessly negative outpourings.”

Taylor Swift’s New Song ‘Lover’ Reveals A Lot About Her Relationship With Joe Alwyn

Miley Cyrus wasn’t the only pop star to drop a new single this week that seems to be about her current relationship status. Taylor Swift released her fourth single—which also happens to be the title track—from her upcoming album Lover.

In some ways, “Lover” goes back to Swift’s roots. The song is relationship and lyrics-driven, a Swift signature, and there’s a hint of her country background in the sound. As for those lyrics, it seems clear that the “lover” being discussed in the song is her current boyfriend Joe Alwyn. It’s a rare glimpse into their romance, given that Swift has kept her relationship with the British actor incredibly private. (They’re rarely even seen together at public events.) Even so, that didn’t stop fan theories and rumors from swirling earlier this year that the couple’s about to get engaged. That hasn’t happened yet, that we know of, but the lyrics of “Lover” imply Swift is in this relationship for the long run.

Below is the lyric video to watch and discuss. (Swift says the full music video will be released next week, ahead of the album.)

The theorizing from fans starts with the first verse, of course.

We could leave the Christmas lights up ’til January / This is our place, we make the rules / And there’s a dazzling haze, a mysterious way about you dear / Have I known you 20 seconds or 20 years?

It’s also now clear that the fake Christmas tree Easter egg in the “ME!” video was a reference to this song.

The second verse appears to verify what many have suspected, but the couple has never confirmed publicly: Alwyn and Swift have been together for three years. (They reportedly met at the 2016 Met Gala, but didn’t start dating until the fall of that year.) As for the rest of the verse, we know Swift loves to have her friends over to hang. She also made a similar reference to a boyfriend’s appeal (who many thought to be Alwyn) in her song, “Gorgeous”: “You’re so gorgeous, I can’t say anything to your face.”

Miley Cyrus’ New Song Sure Sounds Like It’s About Her Breakup With Liam Hemsworth

Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth‘s split is less than a week old, but the singer may have just given us some serious insight into what went wrong—at least from her perspective—in the form of a new song, “Slide Away,” which she released last night.

Last weekend, the couple announced via a representative that they were separating. “Liam and Miley have agreed to separate at this time,” the statement read. “Ever-evolving, changing as partners and individuals, they have decided this is what’s best while they both focus on themselves and careers. They still remain dedicated parents to all of their animals they share while lovingly taking this time apart. Please respect their process and privacy.”

Since then, Cyrus was spotted kissing Kaitlynn Carter in Italy and rumors about what caused the split have been flying. But let’s look at the lyrics for “Sliding Away”—which may offer some clues.

Here’s the audio for the song that Cyrus posted on her YouTube channel—where the only imagery is bottles and pills in the water of a pool or the ocean.

The first verse is quite telling. Cyrus seems to reference the good times in the relationship (“paradise”), and that one day it “turned to dust,” perhaps referencing how quickly things went south for the couple.

Once upon a time, it was paradise / Once upon a time, I was paralyzed / Think I’m gonna miss these harbor lights / But it’s time to let it go / Once upon a time, it was made for us / Woke up one day, it had turned to dust / Baby, we were found, but now we’re lost / So it’s time to let it go

She goes on to sing about wanting a “house in the hills,” which is quite a ways from Malibu, where she and Hemsworth had a home they lost in the fires. Could it also be a subtle wink to Carter, who is currently starring on The Hills: New Beginnings with her ex, Brody Jenner?

I want my house in the hills / Don’t want the whiskey and pills / I don’t give up easily / But I don’t think I’m down

Even the chorus hints that the song could be about Hemsworth, as he’s a known surfer. “So won’t you slide away Back to the ocean, I’ll go back to the city lights,” she sings.

This section might be the most telling, however, given that Miley Cyrus was incredibly young when she met Liam Hemsworth during the filming of their movie, The Last Song:

Miley Cyrus’s New Song Sure Sounds Like It’s About Her Breakup With Liam Hemsworth

Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth‘s split is less than a week old, but the singer may have just given us some serious insight into what went wrong—at least from her perspective—in the form of a new song, “Slide Away,” which she released last night.

Last weekend, the couple announced via a representative that they were separating. “Liam and Miley have agreed to separate at this time,” the statement read. “Ever-evolving, changing as partners and individuals, they have decided this is what’s best while they both focus on themselves and careers. They still remain dedicated parents to all of their animals they share while lovingly taking this time apart. Please respect their process and privacy.”

Since then, Cyrus was spotted kissing Kaitlynn Carter in Italy and rumors about what caused the split have been flying. But let’s look at the lyrics for “Sliding Away”—which may offer some clues.

Here’s the audio for the song that Cyrus posted on her YouTube channel—where the only imagery is bottles and pills in the water of a pool or the ocean.

The first verse is quite telling. Cyrus seems to reference the good times in the relationship (“paradise”), and that one day it “turned to dust,” perhaps referencing how quickly things went south for the couple.

Once upon a time, it was paradise / Once upon a time, I was paralyzed / Think I’m gonna miss these harbor lights / But it’s time to let it go / Once upon a time, it was made for us / Woke up one day, it had turned to dust / Baby, we were found, but now we’re lost / So it’s time to let it go

She goes on to sing about wanting a “house in the hills,” which is quite a ways from Malibu, where she and Hemsworth had a home they lost in the fires. Could it also be a subtle wink to Carter, who is currently starring on The Hills: New Beginnings with her ex, Brody Jenner?

I want my house in the hills / Don’t want the whiskey and pills / I don’t give up easily / But I don’t think I’m down

Even the chorus hints that the song could be about Hemsworth, as he’s a known surfer. “So won’t you slide away Back to the ocean, I’ll go back to the city lights,” she sings.

This section might be the most telling, however, given that Miley Cyrus was incredibly young when she met Liam Hemsworth during the filming of their movie, The Last Song:

Target Is Re-Releasing Its Best Designer Collaborations of All Time—See Every Single Look

Guard your credit card, because Target is gearing up to re-release some of its best, most sought-after designer collaborations from the last two decades.

In honor of 20 years of brand partnerships, Target is launching a sweeping, limited-edition 300-piece collection on September 14 that functions as a greatest hits compilation of its best designer pair-ups of all time. It’ll include a massive variety of clothing, accessories, and household items from Issac Mizrahi, Anna Sui, Lilly Pulitzer, Zac Posen, Missoni, Proenza Schouler, Rodarte, Jason Wu, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altuzarra, and more. Pieces start at just $7 and go up to $160—oh, and this time, all women’s apparel will be available in sizes XS to 3X. Be warned: There’s a five-item limit per customer on this release.

Rick Gomez, Target’s executive vice president and chief marketing and digital officer, said in a press release that this collection is a nod to the company’s effort to bring designer items to everyday consumers. Its first capsule collection was with Mizrahi in 2003; it then ran a few more high-end partnerships before formally creating the Designer Collaborations program, which eventually featured the likes of Alexander McQueen, Jean Paul Gaultier, Peter Pilotto, among others.

“Two decades ago, when we first set out to make beautifully designed products affordable, we created a movement in retail and culture that proclaimed that design could be—and should be—for all,” he said. “This Anniversary Collection takes our guests on a nostalgic journey through our designer collaboration history where they can discover products that they’ll fall in love with all over again, or for some, for the very first time.”

There are so many pieces that are coming back (remember those Missoni coffee cups?!), so if you missed them the first time, now’s your chance to bring them home. If we know one thing about Target’s designer collaborations, it’s that they go fast—so you’ll want to figure out your shopping strategy ahead of the launch. Check out every single lookbook image in the gallery ahead, and start scoping out exactly what five items you want.

Target Is Rereleasing Its Best Designer Collaborations of All Time—See Every Single Look

Guard your credit card, because Target is gearing up to rerelease some of its best, most sought-after designer collaborations from the last two decades.

In honor of 20 years of brand partnerships, Target is launching a sweeping, limited-edition 300-piece collection on September 14 that functions as a greatest hits compilation of its best designer pair-ups of all time. It’ll include a massive variety of clothing, accessories, and household items from Issac Mizrahi, Anna Sui, Lilly Pulitzer, Zac Posen, Missoni, Proenza Schouler, Rodarte, Jason Wu, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altuzarra, and more. Pieces start at just $7 and go up to $160—oh, and this time all women’s apparel will be available in sizes XS to 3X. Be warned: There’s a five-item limit per customer on this release.

Rick Gomez, Target’s executive vice president and chief marketing and digital officer, said in a press release that this collection is a nod to the company’s effort to bring designer items to everyday consumers. Its first capsule collection was with Mizrahi in 2003; it then ran a few more high-end partnerships before formally creating the Designer Collaborations program, which eventually featured Alexander McQueen, Jean Paul Gaultier, and Peter Pilotto, among others.

“Two decades ago, when we first set out to make beautifully designed products affordable, we created a movement in retail and culture that proclaimed that design could be—and should be—for all,” Gomez said. “This Anniversary Collection takes our guests on a nostalgic journey through our designer collaboration history where they can discover products that they’ll fall in love with all over again, or for some, for the very first time.”

There are so many pieces that are coming back (remember those Missoni coffee cups?!), so if you missed them the first time, now’s your chance to bring them home. If we know one thing about Target’s designer collaborations, it’s that they go fast—so you’ll want to figure out your shopping strategy ahead of the launch. Check out every single look book image in the gallery ahead, and start scoping out exactly what five items you want.