The Inspiration for Ariana Grande’s New Song Is So Relatable

Ariana Grande has done it again, people. The Thank U, Next singer has unleashed yet another bop into the world. This one’s called “Boyfriend,” and it was co-written by the duo Social House, whom she frequently collaborates with. Sonically, it’s right on par with the songs she released on both the Sweetener and Thank U, Next albums: soulful and R&B-tinged with an incredibly catchy pop chorus. I’ve already listened to it 15 times, and I haven’t even had breakfast yet.

Fans shouldn’t read too much into the lyrics on this one. There doesn’t appear to be any hidden references to Grande’s ex-boyfriends like there were on the Thank U, Next album. Rather, this breezy track is all about the push-and-pull of being casual with someone but wanting more. “You ain’t my boyfriend (Boyfriend)/And I ain’t your girlfriend (Girlfriend)/But you don’t want me to see nobody else,” Grande sings on the chorus.

Grande took to Twitter Thursday night, August 1, and revealed the inspiration behind the song. “Well, I feel like this song captures a common theme in the lives of so many people I know,” Grande wrote. “People want to feel love but don’t want to define their relationship and have trouble fully committing or trusting or allowing themselves to fully love someone even though they want to.”

She continued, “We wanted to make something uplifting that captures that feeling of being afraid to take the leap and trust, being afraid of being hurt or feeling like you won’t be enough for that person…but also how it feels to have a crippling crush on someone.”

And as if the song wasn’t enough, Grande also dropped the video for “Boyfriend.” In it, Grande and Michael “Mikey” Foster from Social House play jealous friends with benefits who get inexplicably angry when they see the other flirting with someone else. At one point, Grande pulls out a literal bow-and-arrow and…well, just watch it for yourself, below. The 2020 VMAs is already shaking.

Naturally, fans are living for both this song and video:

Thank you, Ariana Grande, for blessing my weekend with yet another banger.

Pink Just Dyed Her Daughter’s Hair to Get Back at Mommy Shamers

Earlier this week, Jessica Simpson faced a slew of mommy shamers after she posted on Instagram a series of photos of her 7-year-old daughter Maxwell Drew at the salon dyeing her hair purple to match Dove Cameron’s Descendants character, Mal. Commenters accused Simpson of “ruining” her daughter’s hair. “Don’t like it at all!!! Much better before the color. The new color makes her look older than her age,” one user wrote.

Many Instagram users jumped to Simpson’s defense, though, asking the critics to mind their own business. “She looks adorable and I’m laughing at all of you clutching your pearls because of hair dye. Your poor kids must have the most boring lives!” one user wrote in the comments.

And one of Simpson’s supporters—a high profile one at that—even took the solidarity to another level: Pink recently shared on Instagram that her daughter has dyed her hair as well.

“I heard people were bummed on Jessica Simpson for letting her seven-year-old get her hair colored,” Pink wrote in the caption of the post, which includes a shot of her 8-year-old daughter, Willow, with blue hair dye. “So we thought we’d share what we did yesterday.” The hashtags say it all: “#bluehairdontcare #getyourownkids #parentpoliceareactuallyjustlonelysadpeople #illdyeyourhairtoolosers #ohlookmanocomments.”

Take a look:

Pink has certainly had her own struggles with mommy shaming. In April, she got backlash from social media users who took issue with the fact that she posted a photo of her baby’s bare bottom on Instagram. She’s also been called out for sharing a photo of her daughter sitting next to the stove, which many social media users criticized as being too “dangerous.”

Nobody Talks About the ‘Otherhood’ Stage of Life—So I Made a Movie About It

As the years went by and we kept pushing to get this movie made, we entered the “otherhood” age group ourselves. That’s when, finally, Netflix rescued us. The movie business had come of age and realized that the majority of the marketplace is female. Hallelujah. We got a green light, put the film together, and made a movie that stands for something. It’s a movie for anyone who has ever been or wants to be or has had a mother.

Looking back at the process of making this movie, it’s clear to me now that I’m essentially trying to show the world the second stage in a woman’s life can be extraordinary. In my younger years, I felt like I had to “find” things all the time. Find a direction, find a school, find a career, find a mate. Growing up in the ’70s and ’80s, life was all about the vision quest. Vision boards, visualize your future, make it happen! I sought validation and felt I had to prove myself. I was trying to answer the question, “What will I get, personally and professionally, from literally everything?” Vision boards have now been replaced by social media influencers, but the impulses haven’t changed for many young women. There’s an even higher expectation to find purpose today. We, the generation of glass ceiling breakers, tell future generations, “Go get what we made possible for you!”

I happen to be on the “otherhood” cusp: My only child leaves for her first year in college in 23 days and 11 hours (but who’s counting?). Everything is a question for her: roommates, leaving home, being a freshman again, choosing a major…. She’s asking herself, “How can I control the outcome of all this?” Yesterday, I had an out-of-body experience as I heard myself tell her, “Honey, no one can control the outcome.” I recognized in that moment that wisdom is the first gift of “otherhood.” What a relief it is to have lived long enough to find peace in the idea that one can lay back and let it all happen, because it’s going to happen anyway and it will happen for a reason.

The second gift of “otherhood” is enjoyment. The first half of my life was all about doing things. These “otherhood” years are about feeling them. Don’t get me wrong: I’m doing stuff all day long. But the hysteria has lifted. I finally feel like, “I’ve got this.” Now I want to feel it. I want to feel what it’s like to make a movie with extraordinary female partners, artists, and actors. I want to laugh and feel joy as I watch the finished product. I know I can’t control how the film will perform, but I can enjoy the process.

Cathy Schulman is a producer on Otherhood, now streaming on Netflix.

Sophie Turner Wore a $99 Mini Skirt—And It’s Still in Stock

It seems that Sophie Turner‘s still not over the glossy patent trend.

The Game of Thrones actress was photographed in New York with husband Joe Jonas, days after getting matching tattoos in honor of their dog Waldo, wearing a mini skirt. Now, given the time of year, that’s not super surprising. What made it an eye-grabbing look was that instead of being linen, denim or some other summery fabric, the skirt was made of black patent.

MMVV, ROKA

Turner styled the skirt, which is from I.AM.GIA with a Gumby T-shirt (yes, that Gumby) and another unseasonable item: a pair of knee-high leather boots.

It might not be the obvious choice for the hottest months of the year, but fashion can’t quite quit the PVC trend that’s been taking over retail for the past year-plus. It does help that Turner’s skirt is surprisingly affordable—$99 at Urban Outfitters, to be precise.

I.AM.GIA Edam Patent Utility Mini Skirt

Urban Outfitters

$99

Buy Now

You probably recognize the brand name from Instagram, or from celebrity style. I.AM.GIA’s been spotted on Bella Hadid, Winnie Harlow, and, of course, the Queen of the North. Turner has actually been wearing its pieces—including the Hersilla jacket and the Angelica corset—for some time.

Turner wearing I.AM.GIA’s Angelica corset while out with Joe Jonas earlier this summer.

Jacopo Raule

Custom Louis Vuitton wedding dress, under-$100 street style—love a star that can do both.

Sophie Turner Wore a $99 Miniskirt—And It’s Still in Stock

It seems that Sophie Turner‘s still not over the glossy-patent trend.

The Game of Thrones actress was photographed in New York City with husband Joe Jonas, days after getting matching tattoos in honor of their dog Waldo, wearing a miniskirt. Now, given the time of year, that’s not super surprising. What made it an eye-grabbing look was that instead of being linen, denim, or some other summery fabric, the skirt was made of black patent.

MMVV, ROKA

Turner styled the skirt, which is from I.Am.Gia, with a Gumby T-shirt (yes, that Gumby) and another unseasonable item: a pair of knee-high leather boots.

It might not be the obvious choice for the hottest months of the year, but fashion can’t quite quit the PVC trend that’s been taking over retail for the past year-plus. It does help that Turner’s skirt is surprisingly affordable—$99 at Urban Outfitters, to be precise.

I.Am.Gia Edam Patent Utility Miniskirt

Urban Outfitters

$99

Buy Now

You probably recognize the brand name from Instagram or from celebrity style. I.Am.Gia’s been spotted on Bella Hadid, Winnie Harlow, and, of course, the Queen of the North. Turner has actually been wearing its pieces—including the Hersilla jacket and the Angelica corset—for some time.

Turner wearing I.Am.Gia’s Angelica corset while out with Joe Jonas earlier this summer

Jacopo Raule

Custom Louis Vuitton wedding dress, under-$100 street style—love a star that can do both.

Jessica Simpson Is Being Mommy-Shamed for Dyeing Her 7-Year-Old’s Hair

In case you haven’t been hanging around kids lately, they’re all pretty much obsessed with the Disney franchise Descendants. This goes for Jessica Simpson’s seven-year-old daughter Maxwell Drew, who loves the show so much she recently dyed her hair purple to match Dove Cameron’s lavender-locked character, Mal. Unfortunately, after Simpson posted a photo of her child’s new look on Instagram, she was slammed by a slew of mommy-shamers.

Simpson shared photos of Maxwell Drew sitting at the salon and showing off the finished hairdo, writing simply, “Inspired by The Descendants” in the caption. The criticism heaped on quickly: “So sad to see a child this young getting her hair dyed. She looked so much prettier with her natural golden locks. She still should be a child in every sense. That time is short,” one person wrote. Others accused Simpson of “ruining” her young daughter’s hair. “Don’t like it at all!!! Much better before the color. The new color makes her look older than her age,” someone said.

Simpson didn’t respond to any of the messages, but others quickly jumped to her defense. “She looks adorable and I’m laughing at all of you clutching your pearls because of hair dye. Your poor kids must have the most boring lives!” one of her followers said. Someone else chimed in and added, “Don’t listen to the haters. It is just hair and it looks so adorable! Doesn’t seem like she was forced into it and it seems that she loves it and is happy. That’s all that matters.”

Simpson and Maxwell’s hairstylist Riawna Capri, from L.A.’s famous Nine Zero One salon, also weighed in, writing, “She was a natural, in her natural habitat. I think we will be seeing her more than her momma.”

Simpson and daughter, Maxwell, in 2017.

Greg Doherty

At Romance Writers of America Conference, Attendees Share Favorite Books (and Dispel Stereotypes)

“I stole my first romance novel from my mom. She saw me reading it and freaked out, because nobody should have to explain an orgasm to a five-year-old,” remembers Seattle-based author Olivia Waite. Decades later, her interest hasn’t faded. Waite is one of around 1,900 people in attendance at the Romance Writers of America conference in New York and among her people.

RWA is the largest annual meet-up for professional romance writers in the world, and the association behind it boasts more than 9,000 members, hundreds of whom make a point to attend its signature event. Because as Alabaman writer Louisa Cornell—who has been to 12 conferences—puts it, “Being a writer can be a very lonely job, especially with romance. This genre is picked apart and looked down on. When it’s a situation where it’s a lonely business, and you’re looked down on for what you write, being able to be with your tribe is very important.”

That sense of camaraderie makes the event feel more like a Panhellenic conference than a traditional work requirement. One woman—a doctor with aquamarine hair—trekked from Toulouse, France, just to be there. In another corner, two women set up shop on the floor, and, over pizza, explained that they’d met at a previous conference and had spent the past 12 months co-writing a romance series together. Seasoned veterans were quick to spot orange ribbons on attendees’ badges, an indication it’s the wearer’s first time, to help bring them into the fold.

Tom Smarch Photography

For these women, who often experience online harassment and are subjected to crude or dismissive assessments of their work, the chance to connect with writer and fans, judgment-free, is a welcome change. “I had a friend of my sister’s ask her how I could write romance novels even though I’m single,” recalls novelist Rebecca Connolly, who had come to New York from Indiana. The comment stung, but she’s used to the criticism. “People think if you write romance novels you’re silly, you’re writing ‘mom porn,’ or you’re setting everyone up for unrealistic expectations. It’s sad because it completely belittles our craft, which we put a lot of work and heart into it.” Jen Geigle Johnson, Connolly’s Denver-based writing partner and roommate at RWA, has also experienced this. “It’s a feminist issue,” Johnson says. “Romance is viewed as a ‘women’s genre,’ which is why it’s downplayed, but the imagery can be just as beautiful as a ‘literary work,’ even though you’re writing a love story.”

It can also be life-changing. While Waite, for example, started off her reading traditional, heteronormative romance stories, she soon decided to check out queer and lesbian literature, sometimes known as F/F in the genre. “I wanted to read more inclusively across sexuality and racial lines. Then I read F/F, and it was like staring into a mirror,” Waite says. She came out as bisexual, and has dedicated herself to writing within the sub-genre. “I wanted to write F/F novels because I wasn’t seeing enough of them in stores. It feels so magical to get more queer romance voices out there, because there’s a real divide between the lesbian romance presses and the mainstream ones.”

Tom Smarch Photography

“There are young girls who are having a tough time with abusive boyfriends, who read young adult romance and see there’s a way out. There are older ladies who are widowed and read romance about women their age and realize there’s happiness still out there,” Cornell adds. “I wish people knew how much people’s lives are saved by these novels. Because there’s nothing better than laughing at a romantic comedy who’s just as clumsy, or spunky, as you are.”

Ready to dive into the happy endings? Read on for some of the RWA members’ favorite romance novels of all-time.

Gina Rodriguez Wrote the Most Heartfelt Tribute to Jane the Virgin

Jane the Virgin ended its spectacular, five-season run on The CW this week, and it’s clear that the show’s star, Gina Rodriguez, is feeling all the things. On Wednesday July 31, just before the grand finale, she posted a lengthy, heartfelt post on Instagram about what the ending meant to her.

She shared a photo of herself wearing a black jacket over a wedding dress—a clue about the happy way the creators decided to end Jane the Virgin. “Wow,” she wrote. “We started shooting the first season of Jane in July 2014. A few days into shooting I turned 30 on set. Yesterday I turned 35. And today is the very last episodes, 99 and 100, airing of Jane the Virgin. Five years. Five years of love, laughter, growth, pain, surprises, deaths, new births and a shit ton of memories.”

“Thank you, Gina, for giving us Jane Villanueva and for all the lessons I have learned through this beautiful character that you portrayed amazingly and to your full potential with your entire heart. No one else could play Jane like you,” one fan wrote in the comments section. Actress Yvonne Orji, known for playing Molly on Issa Rae’s HBO hit Insecure, added, “Amazing!!! AMAZING! 5 glorious years!!”

Gina Rodriguez wasn’t the only person who walked down memory lane before yesterday’s emotional finale. Her co-star, Justin Baldoni, who plays her love interest Rafael Solano, posted an interview in which he tears up talking about the impact of getting to work on Jane. Watch it for yourself, above.

“It’s rare to get a chance to be a part of something this beautiful,” he said. “You grow up and you dream about being a performer or being an actor or being a director and those dreams seem so far away from who you are as a young boy and then you win the lottery and it happens.”

A How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Reboot Is Coming

Grab your love ferns, people, because a reboot of How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days is coming. Yes, according to a new article from the Los Angeles Times, Quibi, a streaming company that develops content exclusively for mobile phones, and Paramount TV are developing an adaptation of the classic Kate Hudson rom-com. Here’s the official description of his reboot, per an email from Quibi: “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days follows a glib young online columnist and an oversexed advertising executive who both need to prove, once and for all, they’re capable of being monogamous. They soon discover, however, keeping a relationship is harder than Andie Anderson made it look!”

Confusion around the phrase “oversexed advertising executive” aside, I’m deliriously excited about this project. Guy Branum, who worked heavily behind the scenes on The Mindy Project, has been tapped to write, so you know it’s in good hands. There’s no word yet, though, on whether Hudson or Matthew McConaughey will make appearances. They could be the bosses of said “glib young online columnist” and “oversexed advertising executive.” I’m just throwing out ideas!

©Paramount/courtesy Everett Collection

And I have many, many more. How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days is, hands down, my favorite romantic comedy of all time. It’s a near-perfect movie. Kate Hudson deserved an Oscar nomination for it. So I’m personally quite invested in making sure this reboot is incredible. Here are just a few tips for making sure that happens:

  • The spirit of the love fern must be present. Ideally, it’s an actual love fern, but I’ll accept a love ficus or love Venus flytrap.
  • Instead of Celine Dion, the “glib young online reporter” should trick the “oversexed advertising executive” into attending a Billie Eilish concert.
  • Give Kathryn Hahn a starring role.
  • A dog must, must, must pee on a pool table.
  • And that dog can only be named Princess Sophia.

People Think Joe Biden’s “Go Easy On Me, Kid” Greeting To Kamala Harris Was Condescending

Presidential hopefuls Senator Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and former Vice President Joe Biden faced off again during the second night of the latest Democratic debates on Wednesday.

The two candidates had previously shared the stage on June 27, when Harris took Biden to task for his record on race and controversial comments he’d made about working with segregationists in the Senate. At the beginning of last night’s debate, Biden seemed to reference the tough exchange, greeting Harris with a remark some found objectionable. His mic captured his joking to her, “Go easy on me, kid.”

And online, the off-the-cuff comment isn’t sitting well with some who feel that referring to a politician like Harris as a “kid” is patronizing at worst and tone-deaf at best.

“@JoeBiden told @KamalaHarris ‘go easy on me kid’ when they shook hands at tonight’s #DemDebate. Calling your presidential opponent ‘kid’ is more than just a harmless ‘Bidenism.’ It’s dismissive,” one person tweeted. Another explained, “I honestly can’t get over Joe Biden calling Kamala Harris ‘kid.’ It was intentionally minimizing. It was designed to make her look petty and small, to put her in her place.”

But Biden’s words didn’t seem to rattle Harris. (Nor did it seem she listened to his request.) During the debate, the candidates sparred over their respective health care plans and Harris defended herself against Biden’s claims that her “Medicare for All” blueprint was too expensive and could cause people to lose their workplace-based insurance. Harris hit back, going on to argue that Biden’s health care proposal would leave out large numbers of Americans who also need coverage.