Kate Middleton and Prince William’s Royal Tour of Pakistan—See All the Best Moments

Another week, another royal tour.

On the heels of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry‘s trip to southern Africa, Kate Middleton and Prince William traveled from London to Islamabad yesterday, October 14, to begin their five-day tour of Pakistan. “This is the most complex tour undertaken by [the duke and duchess] to date, given the logistical and security considerations,” a statement released by Kensington Palace ahead of the tour said. “Pakistan hosts one of Britain’s largest overseas networks, with the British High Commission in Islamabad being one of the United Kingdom’s largest diplomatic missions in the world.”

While the couple’s three children are not with them on this trip, Hello! reports that the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge dropped Prince George and Princess Charlotte at school before their flight to Pakistan.

Here are all the best moments from the royal tour.

The Cambridges had a red carpet arrival in Pakistan, complete with flowers and gifts from local children. Middleton wore a turquoise ombré take on the shalwar kameez, the traditional dress of the country that includes a tunic top over trousers.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images
Karwai Tang/WireImage/Getty Images

First up, the royals visited a school where the children are part of a fast-track teacher training program called Teach for Pakistan, which focuses on young girls and women pursuing jobs in education, before meeting with kids from three schools in the Margalla Hills.

Mashama Bailey Is Becoming the Chef She Was Looking For

Before she was a finalist for the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef Southeast Award in 2018, before she was featured in her own episode of Netflix’s Chef’s Table, Mashama Bailey was, well, fired.

She had been living in New York at the time and working in a homeless shelter, running its after-school program. She was, as she puts it, “qualified, but inexperienced.” She was forced out for a number of reasons—office politics, included. But whatever the explanation, she had both more time on her hands and much, much less income to spend on restaurants and food without the work. So she cooked. People had told her forever that her food was excellent. So when a friend of a friend needed someone to help out on a catering gig, Bailey volunteered. One thing led to another, and in 2000, she enrolled in the Peter Kump Cooking School in midtown Manhattan.

She didn’t fall in love with it all at once or think that a career in food was her fate. But about three months in, she woke up one morning and felt a little off. Not ill, just a tad unwell. She had a part-time job at a cafe at the time and wondered whether she should skip her shift, but it hit her: “If I don’t go in someone is going to have to pick up the slack.” Kitchens are little universes, and each person has a job to do. Bailey felt accountable to her co-workers and to her boss. She wanted to show up for them. That’s when she this could be her fate and that she didn’t want to go back to her 9-to-5 world. “It was such a big change for me,” she admits. “To go into this hot kitchen where there were no rules.”

She buckled down, determined to perfect her knife skills, to learn to clean lettuce, to heat a pan just so. She is a technical person, so the work appealed to her, but she also knew she had no choice but to excel at the basics. “On some level, I think I knew that I had a voice in food,” she explains. “But I knew if I couldn’t work as fast as the men next to me, or if I wasn’t as efficient as the men in the kitchen, I wasn’t going to get far.”

Soon she was working in restaurants and, on the side, as a personal chef. She spent five months in France with the celebrated food writer Anne Willan, at her school La Varenne in 2007. “I want to be a food writer,” she told Willan. But Willan overruled her. “You’re good at this. You should be a cook.” So she went back to New York, working at Davidburke & Donatella, the Oak Room, and Prune. In the meantime, her parents had returned to their southern roots in Georgia. And Bailey wanted a break from New York, too. It was Prune chef and owner Gabrielle Hamilton who introduced Bailey to her current business partner, Johno Morisano. He had wanted to open a restaurant, but needed a chef. With her taste for the south and a certain exhaustion with the pace of New York, Bailey was an ideal candidate. The two opened The Grey in a restored bus station in Savannah, Georgia, in 2014.

Within its first 12 months, it was written up in the Washington Post. In 2015, Food & Wine named it one of the best restaurants of 2015. In 2017, Eater declared it its “Restaurant of the Year.” Critic Bill Addison wrote, “At a time when Southern cuisine has soaked up the limelight for at least the last 15 years, the restaurant synthesizes much of what’s relevant about this moment in American dining: an amalgamation of global and regional flavors; a big-city chef making a seismic impact in a smaller town; and an acute awareness of, and reckoning with, complex racial, economic, and cultural histories.” Also, the food was transcendent.

Alison Roman Reinvented America’s Favorite Cookie. Up Next, World Domination

It’s hard to describe the mania that sweeps the internet when a new recipe from Alison Roman drops. Pulses quicken. Pans are whipped off their shelves. Within hours (sometimes minutes?) the photos pour in. And at some point, a hashtag becomes its shorthand. Not “Salted Butter and Chocolate Chunk Shortbread,” but #TheCookies. Not “Spiced Chickpeas Stew With Coconut and Turmeric,” but #TheStew. (Has the humble chickpea ever been so exulted?)

The cookbook author, New York Times columnist, and Bon Appétit contributor inspires such fandom it seems odd the group hasn’t come up with a name, like the Romantics. The Alisonnets?

The point is the enthusiasts are devoted. And their ranks are filled with home cooks, elite chefs, editors, and at least one Pulitzer Prize winner. Late last month, when the New York Times published one of Roman’s latest⁠—”Vinegar Chicken with Crushed Olive Dressing,” or #TheChicken—the writer Colson Whitehead summed up much of the viral response to the recipe with a simple tweet: “Fuck it, I’m in!”

This month, Roman, 34, releases her second cookbook, a followup to the 2017 sensation that was Dining In. She describes Nothing Fancy: Unfussy Food for Having People Over as the first’s “cool older sister.” It’s a bit more “evolved,” as she puts it. But just because it’s more ambitious, doesn’t mean it has to be complicated. Some of the most mouth-watering recipes in the book have just a few ingredients, like the garlic-laced spread Roman calls her “house dip.”

And as with Dining In, which was meant to nudge people into the kitchen, this cookbook also has an agenda. “Having food is great!” she summaraizes. “I feel like people panic about having enough food or the right food but just have food. It doesn’t have to be an elaborate multi-course meal.” In fact with an entire section of the book devoted to snacks, there’s a case to be made for a dinner built atop the perfect cracker or around a baked potato bar. Roman just wants people to commit to the notion that it doesn’t have to be stressful to send around a quick email or text invitation and sit down to delicious food. That could mean “house dip,” potato chips, and caviar or lasagna or a roast chicken. Or it could involve an summons to “come over for a giant ham,” which is a thing Roman that has done.

An admitted perfectionist, Roman tests and re-tests her recipes to make sure that when someone turns to one for that impromptu dinner, it works. It is after all much less fun to be spontaneous when the vegetables are burnt and the steak overcooked. “It’s all about trust,” Roman points out. Which means it’s important to her to be available to readers and to let them know that she’s a real person, with each of her recipes workshopped in her own (small!) home kitchen. (“If I had three fridges, I would be Martha Stewart. “I’d be like, ’75 lobsters for my closest friends!'”)

It also means about about 250,000 people expect to be able to get a hold of her on Instagram. Roman tries hard not to let the constant pressure (and occasional blowback—see an entire article titled “Is #TheStew Actually That Good?”) affect her: “I think that I use Instagram now as a place for output. I take in much less than I used to. For me, it’s a place where I can go and share work, and I can announce things, and I can get information into the hands of the people that want it, whether that’s a new recipe, or an event, or whatever.”

Molly Yeh Is Building an Empire on Tater Tots, Tahini, and Sprinkles

“When Nick brought up the idea of moving to the farm, I thought, ‘Oh my gosh. I could spend my days blogging,'” Yeh recalls. “And that was the moment when I thought that it really could become a real thing.” She also picked up a few shifts baking at a cafe in town, both for the structure, the income, and friends. Except for Hagen, she didn’t know a soul in North Dakota. After hours, she’d develop recipes and reach out to other bloggers. She started to write for Food52 and other sites. “I felt like it was too good to be true,” she remembers. Getting paid to bake at home.

The internet of course was and is full of blogs, but Yeh’s felt different. Its enthusiasm felt real. The love of sprinkles genuine. And of course, the recipes were great. Not just another vanilla cake, but one punched up with marzipan buttercream. Not just cupcakes, but black sesame cupcakes.

“It’s never been my goal to create something that is found on the internet elsewhere,” Yeh says. “I only want to create things that are new. I don’t want to take up space with another avocado toast.” That foundational commitment is perhaps one of the reasons that Yeh isn’t afraid to introduce readers to a flavor that some don’t know or ask them to special order a spice. She’s a Jewish Chinese cook who lives in North Dakota on a beet farm. Now would be a terrible time to be afraid to stand out.

She hears from a lot of people who are one of a handful of Jewish people in their town or a recent urban transplant to a rural area. She also just hears from a lot of people who share her love of marzipan. With the show—the production of which she likens to summer camp because “we all just pile into the house and hang out and eat food”—her audience has expanded. But at the moment, she’s most interested in cooking for one special viewer—her seven-month-old, Bernie. “I have a cookbook where I keep all the recipes from these milestones, her first Passover, her first Rosh Hashanah,” Yeh explains. The weekend after this interview, Yeh plans to take her apple-picking and then jar applesauce. She’s one of the Food Network’s most bankable stars. She has a rabid fanbase, two cookbooks, and almost 420,000 Instagram followers. But Yeh is nervous: “It’s her first applesauce, so it has to be perfect.”

When Yeh moved to the farm, food is what helped connect her to her neighbors, who lives miles and miles from her. “In most places in the Midwest, the best food is found in people’s homes, on their farms, at church potlucks,” Yeh says. “The culture of home-cooking is so strong. Nick has recipes that have been in the family for generations and he still knows the stories behind them.” If she can give something to her daughter and to her viewers, it’s that. That sense of pride in heritage and self and place. And also, of course, that sense of when to drizzle a dish with tahini.

11 Women Who Are Changing the Food World

This year has made one thing clear: Women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field—they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award–winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. So far, we’ve celebrated women in sports, beauty, and style. Up now: 11 women who have made the food world more equitable, more ambitious, and so much more delicious. From an MIT-trained flavor scientist to a chef who’s created a new canon in southern cuisine, these women have expanded our minds and our palates. Mmm. Dig in.

Natasha Pickowicz Makes Fund-Raising for Planned Parenthood a Sweet Deal

It was November 9, 2016, and Natasha Pickowicz woke up with an emotional hangover. She felt stunned. Drained. Mad. Donald Trump had just clinched the election, but she still had to pick herself up, endure her normal hour-long commute, and go to her job at Flora Bar, as if nothing had happened. But at work, no one could focus. Instead the chefs, managers, and staff met to figure out how to turn pain into purpose.

So Pickowicz—the executive pastry chef at Flora Bar and Café Altro Paradiso best known for her black-cardamom-heavy sticky buns—went back to basics. She proposed the idea of a bake sale. “I was like, What if we did something that everybody could relate to this nostalgic, timeless idea?” she tells Glamour. “Whether you were little and it was in your church basement, or in middle school for your field hockey team, everyone’s had the experience of setting up your table, hanging out with friends, and raising money [with baked goods].”

Simple in theory, sure, but the bake sale Pickowicz, 35, pulled off would put any PTA mom to shame. Gone were traces of Betty Crocker or Pillsbury Funfetti. Instead, in the spring of 2017, Pickowicz invited 18 world-renowned pastry chefs and friends to come together and bake 50 items each. People like Bon Appetit‘s Claire Saffitz and James Beard Award–winning cookbook author Dorie Greenspan all joined forces to sell their signature goods and raise funds for Planned Parenthood of New York City with each spoonful of sugar. That afternoon Pickowicz collected $8,000—and an annual tradition was born.

In 2018, Pickowicz raised $22,000—once again all in $5 increments. And for the third, which was held this past spring, Picowicz set the ambitious goal of $40,000. She met it, and then some, raising $96,000. The growth has been exponential, but there are certain pillars that have anchored each event. It takes place at Café Altro Paradiso, it lasts one (long) shift, and proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood of New York City, not the national organization. “It was important to me that it was about our community and what’s happening here,” she says. “This way I can find out firsthand how our funds are getting used. The money is going toward more hormone therapy centers in the boroughs. They’re also building a fleet of mobile health centers, these trucks that will park and and be based in underserved areas. So it’s these hyper-regional things that PPNYC is working on.”

And while Pickowicz’s bake sale has remained focused on New York, for New York, more and more bake sales like hers are popping up nationwide. She’s frequently tagged on Instagram in photos from bake sales in Nashville or Charlotte, North Carolina, or someone emails her for advice. “I’ve had young women reach out to me and be like, ‘I had a bake sale at my local park!’ And then there’s the bigger ones, like in New Orleans, where they raised $60,000,” she says. “People are also doing them in red states, where they’ve gotten a lot of blowback from people in the community who are offended by it. Like, this summer, we saw a lot of them for Yellowhammer Fund and [to protect reproductive rights] in Alabama.”

As she begins planning for her 2020 bake sale, Pickowicz dreams of seeing even more people follow in her footsteps—and for the sale to have an even larger impact. “With the presidential election next fall, it’s going to be a really, really crucial year,” she says. “And with four years having gone by, I hope that next year explodes more than ever.”


This year has made one thing clear: Women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field—they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award–winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. So far, we’ve celebrated women in sports, beauty, and style. Up now: 12 women who have made the food world more equitable, more ambitious, and so much more delicious. From an MIT-trained flavor scientist to a chef who’s created a new canon in Southern cuisine, these women have expanded our minds and our palates. Mmm. Dig in.

How Great Jones Co-Founders Sierra Tishgart and Maddy Moelis Cooked Up the Next Great Kitchenware Brand

With Great Jones, dinner at home is more accessible—and more fun. The brand launched with a dutch oven christened “The Dutchess,” which comes in such shades as broccoli and mustard. Soon after it set up a service called “Potline” that users can text for recipe advice or food inspiration. (Text 1-814-BISCUIT.) With each new well-crafted element, Great Jones cements its place in the home cook’s dream kitchen. To quote an iconic hostess and Real Housewives of New York star, Tishgart and Moelis have made it nice.

Now Great Jones has a real staff, an office kitchen, and ambitions much bigger than just looking good on Instagram. “We’re working on product development now,” Tishgart confirms. “From the beginning, we thought about the kitchen as a broader space than just the five pots and pans that we launched with, and we’re excited to tackle other parts of the kitchen where we feel like there’s a need for improvement.”

Moelis points out that their hotline has been an outsize success, indicating that Great Jones isn’t just in the business of retail, but in fact has inspired a kind of tribe of home cooks. For Tishgart, who still draws on her editorial experience, the question is: “How can we both entertain and educate people?”

“Things move so fast now, and people can press a button and get whatever,” Tishgart notes. “Cooking is a moment to slow down.”

A few months ago, Tishgart’s then-fiancé gave her a 30-minute warning that he’d invited three people over for dinner. She Googled a Bon Appétit recipe for clams, to which she added chickpeas. Then she piled “blobs of ricotta” on top of fresh zucchini and pesto. “I put those things on the table with a big baguette. We sat outside and it was wonderful.”

Tishgart can’t hand-deliver baked clams or warm bread to her customers. But if Great Jones can make that feeling of nourishing friends and loved ones over a simple meal feel just a little bit more achievable, well, that should earn her five stars.

Mattie Kahn is the senior culture editor at Glamour. Follow her @mattiekahn.

This year has made one thing clear: Women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field—they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award–winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. So far, we’ve celebrated women in sports, beauty, and style. Up now: 11 women who have made the food world more equitable, more ambitious, and so much more delicious. From an MIT-trained flavor scientist to a chef who’s created a new canon in southern cuisine, these women have expanded our minds and our palates. Mmm. Dig in.

Cara Nicoletti Knows How the Sausage Gets Made

Growing up, Cara Nicoletti was never told to eat her vegetables. Instead, she spent her childhood hanging around her grandfather’s butcher shop in Massachusetts. Meat was the family business—and business was good. Her grandfather Seymour was a third-generation butcher, and while his daughters didn’t take up the profession, all worked at the store. Nicoletti, 36, ran the counter and eventually graduated to making sausages because, “It was apparently the least dangerous thing to do, even though there’s like a million ways you can die doing it,” she tells Glamour. And at home it was meat, meat, meat. So it wasn’t until Nicoletti began working in New York City kitchens—first as a pastry chef—that her love affair with vegetables began.

Nicoletti, who now rarely eats meat at all, is known on Instagram for her technicolor sausages, which come in shades of fuchsia, lime green, orange, and more. Nicoletti’s blends combine vegetables, herbs, and other unexpected ingredients to make to make her signature off-beat sausage flavors like borscht, banh mi, and chicken parmesan. The idea for them first came to her while working in a butcher shop a decade ago. Nicoletti was discouraged by how many people—like her younger self—were only eating meat. She was desperate to get people to diversify their diet, and decided to try a trojan-horse approach. “Part of the process of hiding these vegetables in the sausage was not saying, ‘Here’s a chicken sausage with mushrooms and spinach,'” she says. “Instead I’d rename them as a meal in a casing so people would think, ‘What’s a matzoh ball soup sausage? That’s funny, I’d buy that.’ And then it just so happens that it’s 30% vegetables and you’re eating less meat.”

Her chicken tikka masala, pho, and other delicacies have since gone viral—though Nicoletti is adamant that the fleeting fame associated with Internet popularity was never her intention. “In this Instagram age, and especially being a woman in a super male-dominated industry, I think a lot of people want to look at what I’m doing and say that I’m only doing it for the ‘gram,” she says. “And I don’t give a shit, I really don’t. But the thing I always fall back on is that these are actually incredibly well-made and really fucking delicious. So come at me all you want, but actually try them.”

As her platform expanded, opportunities to move out from behind the meat counter came fast. After teaching a sausage making class to a VICE executive, higher-ups asked her to star on a Munchies show. Nicoletti became the host of The Hangover Show, for which she made dishes like cheeseburger fried rice, avocado toast pizza, and bacon egg and cheese wontons that would “cure your hangover.” After that ended, Nicoletti developed Open Fire with the brand, where she cooks with chefs across cultures.

Padma Lakshmi Turned a Mixed-Berry Pie Into a Call to Action

It was Fourth of July and Padma Lakshmi wasn’t feeling particularly patriotic. Lakshmi, 49, doesn’t bake often, but on the holiday she traditionally makes a dessert for her daughter, Krishna. So she decided to get creative. She whipped up a mixed-berry pie, and used the crust to spell out a simple, yet powerful message: “Close the Camps.” She captured a photo of her American flag-inspired confection and posted it on Instagram with the caption, “While we celebrate the Fourth, there are refugee families legally seeking asylum in this country being detained and forced to sleep on concrete floors with aluminum blankets and no medical care. This is a stain on our nation and we need to do something now. Contact your representatives tomorrow to demand they #CloseTheCamps.”

The Top Chef host’s pie went viral. Celebrities like Busy Philipps and Amy Schumer shared it on their own pages, and fans everywhere baked their own subversively star-spangled desserts in homage.

Lakshmi was born in Delhi and grew up between India and New York, before settling in California—a journey that has shaped her activism. “I was separated from my mother because she immigrated to this country and I stayed back with my grandparents, so this is something that’s very close to my heart,” Lakshmi tells Glamour. “In my case, it was done in the most gentle, loving, caring manner. I was left in the bosom of my extended family who took care of me. And I still suffered trauma because of that. Because in those developmental years, from age two to four, to not see either of your parents, it’s really, really damaging.”

With the renewed restrictions on immigration in the U.S. under the Trump administration, Lakshmi felt compelled to take a stand. She got involved with the ACLU, and then it occurred to her that the medium she was best suited to use to create change was food. At first, she considered another cookbook. But then Hulu reached out and Lakshmi signed a deal with their upcoming kitchen vertical to create a show all about the cuisine of immigrant communities. (It will also be Lakshmi’s first solo series.)

“The Hulu show came about because I’ve always felt strongly that the kind of food that is produced by immigrants is the most interesting and delicious. And after the election I started getting really incensed about what was happening with the Muslim ban and family separation,” she says. “[I’m using] food in a way to explain what this country really looks like. Who are Americans today, and who are the new Americans shaping [culture] today?”

These are questions that Lakshmi has tried to answer throughout her career. On any given day you can find her throwing a comedy show to benefit abortion access, protesting alongside McDonald’s workers calling for sexual harassment reform at the fast-food chain, or baking a pie that packs a punch.

How Great Jones Cofounders Sierra Tishgart and Maddy Moelis Cooked Up the Next Great Kitchenware Brand

With Great Jones, dinner at home is more accessible—and more fun. The brand launched with a Dutch oven, christened The Dutchess, which comes in such shades as broccoli and mustard. Soon after, it set up a service called Potline that users can text for recipe advice or food inspiration (text 1-814-BISCUIT), With each new well-crafted element, Great Jones cements its place in the home cook’s dream kitchen. To quote an iconic hostess and Real Housewives of New York star, Tishgart and Moelis have made it nice.

Now Great Jones has a real staff, an office kitchen, and ambitions much bigger than just looking good on Instagram. “We’re working on product development now,” Tishgart confirms. “From the beginning, we thought about the kitchen as a broader space than just the five pots and pans that we launched with, and we’re excited to tackle other parts of the kitchen where we feel like there’s a need for improvement.”

Moelis points out that their hotline has been an outsize success, indicating that Great Jones isn’t just in the business of retail but in fact has inspired a kind of tribe of home cooks. For Tishgart, who still draws on her editorial experience, the question is, “How can we both entertain and educate people?”

“Things move so fast now, and people can press a button and get whatever,” Tishgart says. “Cooking is a moment to slow down.”

A few months ago, Tishgart’s then fiancé gave her a 30-minute warning that he’d invited three people over for dinner. She googled a Bon Appétit recipe for clams, to which she added chickpeas. Then she piled “blobs of ricotta” on top of fresh zucchini and pesto. ”I put those things on the table with a big baguette. We sat outside, and it was wonderful.”

Tishgart can’t hand-deliver baked clams or warm bread to her customers. But if Great Jones can make that feeling of nourishing friends and loved ones over a simple meal seem just a little bit more achievable, well, that should earn her five stars.

Mattie Kahn is the senior culture editor at Glamour. Follow her @mattiekahn.

This year has made one thing clear: Women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field—they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award–winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. So far, Glamour has celebrated women in sports, beauty, and style. Up now: 12 women who have made the food world more equitable, more ambitious, and so much more delicious. From an MIT-trained flavor scientist to a chef who’s created a new canon in Southern cuisine, these women have expanded our minds and our palates. Mmm. Dig in.