Read Liam Hemsworth’s Latest Statement on His Split From Miley Cyrus

Liam Hemsworth is reportedly in Australia with his older brother, Chris, riding out the frenzy surrounding news that he and Miley Cyrus are splitting after less than a year of marriage. (The couple first started dating nearly 10 years ago.)

While Cyrus has been actively posting on Instagram, Hemsworth has remained offline. Until now. Yesterday there were reports that he had spoken briefly to a Daily Mail reporter, saying, “You don’t understand what it’s like. I don’t want to talk about it, mate.” But in his latest Instagram post, the actor says he has not talked to any journalists and isn’t planning to any time soon.

“Hi all, Just a quick note to say that Miley and I have recently separated and I wish her nothing but health and happiness going forward,” he wrote, alongside a beautiful photo of a sunset. “This is a private matter and I have not made, nor will I be making, any comments to any journalists or media outlets. Any reported quotes attributed to me are false. Peace and Love.”

Hemsworth’s latest statement comes amid reports in People that Cyrus “really fought to make” their relationship work. A source also tells the magazine, “She wanted to go to therapy. She just wants to be in a healthy and focused place.”

The couple married last December not long after their Malibu home was destroyed by wildfires. “Miley took [the fire] a lot harder than Liam did, and he is the one who helped her get through it and realize everything would be OK,” a source told People. “She even said it all the time herself, that he was her ‘survival partner.’ She took their commitment to marriage seriously and was so excited about being married once she realized it’s what she wanted.”

We’ll keep you posted with any more updates as they come in.

Now You Can Listen to All 131 of the ‘Baby-Sitters Club’ Books on Audio

The Baby-Sitters Club is truly having a moment in 2019. Just last week Netflix announced that the streaming service is turning the classic series of novels into a new series starring Alicia Silverstone as Kristy Thompson’s mom, Elizabeth Thomas-Brewer. And now, starting today, Audible is releasing all 131 titles onto its platform for your nostalgic listening pleasure as the summer winds to a close.

Audible has even secured a big star to narrate the first five novels: Elle Fanning. “The fierce friendships and babysitting adventures of The Baby-Sitters Club have been so much fun to perform,” the actor said in a press release. “It has been such an exciting and new experience for me to bring this entrepreneurial squad to life as Audible books. People can now relive these coming-of-age stories in a whole new way or enjoy them for the very first time.”

A scene from the 1995 film version

©Columbia Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection

But really, did the books ever go away? We’d argue no. The first book by Ann M. Martin was published in 1986, and since then, more than one generation has learned a thing or two about entrepreneurship, friendship, family problems, and coming of age from Kristy Thomas, Mary Anne Spier, Claudia Kishi, Stacey McGill, Dawn Schafer, and all the other characters who are introduced in the fictional town of Stoneybrook, Connecticut. And then, of course, there was the great 1995 film starring Rachel Leigh Cook and Schuyler Fisk, among others.

“I’m thrilled to see that the readership for The Baby-sitters Club continues to grow after all these years,” Martin said in Audible’s press release. “And I’m grateful and honored to hear from fans—young and old—who have supported the series with such affection, love and nostalgia for all things BSC. I’m excited that Audible will bring the books to life in a new format for the next generation.”

Get your Baby-Sitters Club fix here—and you’ll be prepped and ready when the Netflix show finally premieres.

Glamour Women of the Year All Year: Beauty

This year has made one thing clear: women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field, they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award-winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. We’ve celebrated the women in sports, up now: 12 women who are making their mark in the world of beauty, where entrepreneurs, artists, influencers, and legislators are fighting to make the beauty industry—and our culture at large—a more inclusive, truly beautiful place.


Anne Marie Nelson-Bogle Climbed the Ladder at L’Oréal. Now She’s Calling the Shots.

Despite a new guard of women-led start-ups challenging the beauty industry, the corporate world of Big Business Beauty remains a fairly male-dominated environment. But there are glimmers of hope proving women can get ahead at the giants built on our spending power, and no one exemplifies that more Anne Marie Nelson-Bogle.

For over 16 years, Nelson-Bogle has climbed corporate ladder at L’Oréal, working on various brands under the company’s umbrella. She began as a group manager for L’Oréal Paris Skin Care’s Canadian market in 2004, making stops along the way in the marketing departments for La Roche-Posay, Maybelline New York, and L’Oréal Paris Cosmetics. Now, as the Deputy General Manager for L’Oréal’s entire U.S. portfolio, she’s the decision-maker behind all the major campaigns and spokeswomen you see on TV. She knows what women want when it comes to beauty, and she’s pushing back against the industry’s status-quo.

“Women are defined by so much more than just their age or backgrounds, and we want this to come across in everything we do,” Nelson-Bogle tells Glamour. The core of every L’Oréal Paris campaign is the brand’s slogan “Because you’re worth it,” which the exec says has gone beyond a tagline to become a promise to empower women. It’s a mission that’s incredibly personal to Nelson-Bogle, and to her, that means showcasing women of all walks of life, particularly when it comes to aging and skin tone. “I know when you recognize and realize your worth, it’s a powerful thing,” she says. “I hope to help instill this sense of worth in others.”

One of the ways she leads the charge in this is through L’Oréal Paris’ Women of Worth philanthropy, which awards one winner $25,000 to her own charitable initiatives each year. Over the past 13 years, more than 130 women have been honored. Nelson-Bogle says it’s one of the most rewarding parts of her job. “One honoree who stands out is Jaha Dukureh, who was recognized as a Woman of Worth in 2015,” she says. “Jaha was recognized for her cause, Safe Hands for Girls, which does life-saving work to protect young girls against female genital mutilation in Gambia, Africa. I’m incredibly humbled and proud of my role in a company that uses our global platform to elevate their inspiring stories and missions.”

Of course, philanthropy is only part of her role—another big part is casting the spokeswomen who represent the brand and what it stands for. In an industry where youth is not only the ideal but the standard, it’s still considered a risk to show a women over 40 as aspirational. But it’s a risk Nelson-Bogle is happy to take.

The Golden Age of Influencers Might Be Ending, But Jackie Aina Is Just Getting Started

If that’s not proof enough of clout she’s earned herself, there’s this: at a recent editor-only event for Pat McGrath, one of the industry’s most influential makeup artists, Aina was the sole influencer to appear, looking right at home as she caught up with McGrath one-on-one.

There are few individuals that brands both deeply adore and are afraid to be called out by—a review from Aina carries enough weight to make or break a launch, and she says she often consults with brands for free. It’s a task she’s more than willing to undertake, knowing that there’s often a disconnect between what companies discuss at the table and what consumers of color need. “These things that happen probably could’ve been avoided if you had somebody from that community at the table actually saying, ‘This isn’t a good idea.’”

Not only is Aina calling on brands to do better, she also weaves necessary discussions of cultural appropriation and representation into her videos. Her viral “colorblind” makeup tutorial is evidence that viewers watch—and appreciate—content that directly addresses these issues. Aina recalls how early on in her career, a subscriber approached her and told her she had previously hesitated to wear red lipstick because she was too dark. Through her channel, Aina showed her she could feel beautiful. “It’s always the ‘thank you for teaching me that dark skin isn’t punishment and isn’t ugly’ moments that tell me I’m doing something worthy,” she says.

There’s been plenty of chatter about 2019 being the end of influencers, but Aina isn’t worried one bit. She thinks people are turning to accounts that make them feel seen now more than ever. “You can go online and find someone who looks like you, thinks the same way you do, had the same struggle, but got out of that,” she says. “There are so many great things about that. People really want to know you holistically; especially what else you stand for.”

For Aina, the message has always been clear—and it’s always been bigger than her. “What is this going to do for my community?” says Aina. “If I don’t say anything, will it harm my community?” With that in mind, she keeps speaking up.

Bella Cacciatore is the beauty associate at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram @bellacacciatore_.


This year has made one thing clear: Women are showing up, stepping up, and taking what they deserve. From politics to pop culture, women aren’t just leveling the playing field—they’re owning it. As we ramp up to our annual Women of the Year summit, we will be highlighting women across industries who do the work every day. Whether it’s the CEO of a multinational retail corporation, a James Beard Award–winning chef, or the World Cup champions, here are the women you need to know right now. We’ve celebrated the women in sports, up now: 12 women who are making their mark in the world of beauty, where entrepreneurs, artists, influencers, and legislators are fighting to make the beauty industry—and our culture at large—a more inclusive, truly beautiful place.

Ashley Armitage Is Redefining Beauty Ideals One Photo at a Time

Fueled even more by her refusal to have the female-gaze go ignored, Armitage set her sights on photography. Finally, she had the creative control she lacked for so long. She began shooting her friends and sister at the pool, in their bathrooms, and hanging out at home together; her focus primarily being on the sisterhood they had with one another and capturing a realistic portrait of what it was like to be a 19-year-old girl.

Eventually, she found a medium to amplify her work past the small community in her hometown: Instagram.

“When I first started photography, it was super personal,” she says. “It was literally me taking photos of my friends, and I wouldn’t post them to the internet. I didn’t know, really, what was happening or that it was even important work at the time, because it was literally just a personal project. I made an Instagram in 2014 and started posting my work. I had only a couple hundred followers at first. Then it started. The audience began growing, surprisingly to me at the time, because I had no idea people cared.”

In 2015, she posted a photo of her friend at the beach. They were wearing underwear with a period stain on it and their pubic hair was showing. The rest, as they say, was history. “It started exploding on the internet,” Armitage recalls. “It started out positive because it was just my inner circle of friends. Like, ‘Yeah, that’s awesome. That’s real! Who the heck has the money to throw out their underwear every time they get a blood stain?’ Then this huge wave of internet trolls and negativity started coming in. It was all super, super terrible. One comment literally said, ‘Shave your slob box.’ Another said, ‘No man is ever going to want you.'”

Once again, a fire was lit inside Armitage. “All these comments really told me that a woman’s body only has to do with how she fits into a male gaze,” she says. “It was mainly men talking about how they felt and whether or not the photo was sexy to a man.” Armitage can’t say she was too surprised. To be fair, she and her friends lived in their “own little paradise” in Seattle—where neither she nor her friends shaved. In the media, the only images being shown at the time were one-dimensional portrayals of beauty and magazines were still running coverlines like “How to Get the Perfect Beach Bod.”

“It reminded me how backwards the world actually is,” she says, and it made her remember why she’d started capturing those kinds of images in the first place. “I went into photography thinking, I want to bring in a new voice. I want to show different body types, different genders, different skin tones, and things that society would say are imperfect like fat rolls, pimples, or stretch marks.” Her next goal, then, became increasingly clear: “I thought, ‘I’m going to have to continue doing this work, because we have to normalize this, apparently.'”

Celebrity Hairstylist Lacy Redway Wants the Industry to Step Up

To witness Lacy Redway at work is to witness undeniable talent. Her hands effortlessly sculpt pearl-studded updos, modern Victory rolls, billowy curls, and cascading box braids. You’ve seen her influence in the pages of magazines and on the red carpet, where she works with A-listers like Tessa Thompson, Lucy Boynton, and Lupita Nyong’o. She can do, it seems, anything. And it is important to remember the scope of her abilities because in 2019, in an industry where inclusivity and diversity have become buzzwords, the same can’t be said for other artists of her caliber.

To call the 32-year-old, New Jersey-based (but often bicoastal) Redway “the stylist everyone wants” is accurate. But it doesn’t quite capture the full extent of her power. High-fashion hair—a scene she now navigates with command—has traditionally been a boys’ club of big names, with men still keying many of the major shows at New York Fashion Week. “It’s still hard for women to be given those opportunities, and that’s something I take very seriously in my kind of activism—if you will—within this industry,” she says, citing Odile Gilbert as one of the few female stylists to pave the way. “When I started out, it was only her at that level.”

Now, things are gradually changing, but Redway is well aware that progress can only occur when respected figures are willing to step forward and push back. “I’ve decided that speaking out and speaking up is an unpopular voice because it makes people uncomfortable,” she acknowledges. “But I think it’s time for us to get uncomfortable and have a real conversation about what’s happening and why women are not getting the same opportunities that men are getting in this industry. I know personally that I can do anything to anybody’s hair.”

Lucy Boynton

Tessa Thompson

Lupita Nyong’o

Emmy Rossum

To arrive at that level, she got her on-set start assisting for a hair package company. And long before that, she had already begun putting her gifts into practice. “I was always the girl who did hair in school,” she recalls. “It was just something that I naturally knew how to do.” When her family emigrated from Jamaica, she made extra money working in salons throughout high school and college. At the time, she thought about becoming a publicist, not yet realizing that styling hair could give her access to the fashion world.

Once she began assisting on shoots, she realized she had found her calling. “That was my ‘Aha!’ moment,” she says. “I just loved being a part of that process. I knew I wanted more for myself.” From there, she hired a makeup artist and a photographer for her first shoot, recruiting her cousin as the model. In a pre-Instagram era, she already understood how the internet could help her make a name for herself. She simultaneously created platforms on MySpace, Model Mayhem (a site primarily for beauty creatives just starting out), and Black Hair Media (which she credits for her discovery of lace fronts). Soon, women were traveling from all over the world asking her to do their extensions.

Her career would only continue skyrocketing from this point. Redway made the decision to get her beauty school license and learn proper techniques, while also assisting backstage (and clocking three hours of sleep a night). She learned from the editorial greats, doing stints for legendary stylists like Guido Palau, Eugene Souleiman, and the aforementioned Gilbert. “What afforded me the opportunity to assist so many people was because I knew how to specialize in things that a lot of the assistants at the time didn’t know how to do, like braids and textured hair,” she says. “The first time I did a show with Guido, I didn’t realize my braiding skill was different from anyone else. I grew a crowd around me while I was braiding on one of the shows. That’s when I realized I had something. That was a success for me.”

Kourtney Kardashian on Cosmetics, Capitol Hill, and What’s Next for Poosh

The majority of the stories also included the plea to Congress by Scott Faber, the senior vice president of government affairs at EWG. “Under current law, cosmetics companies can put just about anything in cosmetics and personal care products. There are few if any restrictions on the kinds of ingredients that can be added to personal care products or the amount of those chemicals,” he told the room. “What the Feinstein-Collins bill will do, is it will give FDA the power to review the most controversial ingredients or chemicals in personal care products, and ultimately make a determination if those ingredients are safe or safe at certain levels or not safe.”

That was 16 months ago. The bill has still yet to pass.

What makes the situation feel especially urgent: a number of major beauty conglomerates are actually in support of more regulation. L’Oréal Paris, Procter & Gamble (parent company of Olay and Herbal Essences), Unilever (parent company of Dove and TRESemmé), Revlon, Johnson & Johnson, and Estée Lauder all backed the measures, despite a strict set of personal policies they enforce to ensure their products are safe. Where things get potentially dicey are with smaller, off-label brands and—horrifyingly—”kiddie makeup,” which has raised concern time and time again after reports continue to surface about trace amounts of asbestos lurking in makeup marketed to young girls.

“I don’t know if cosmetics regulation has been swept under the rug because the word ‘cosmetics’ makes you think of girls putting on makeup—but it’s so much more than that,” says Kardashian. “It’s all personal care products, from things you use on newborn babies to deodorant, toothpaste, and face wash. They’re things every single human uses at least once, if not multiple times a day. By calling it ‘cosmetics,’ it’s not taken as such a serious issue.”

It is a serious issue, though, and Kardashian is getting tired of waiting.

“I would love to get the cosmetics reform laws passed so I can move on to a different topic,” she says. “I’m really, really passionate about schools and what they’re feeding kids. To me, there are certain things that shouldn’t even be at kids’ schools. So many of us are living our busy lives and doing the best we can, and so many people don’t have the information to know certain things are healthy or unhealthy for our kids. It especially goes together with school and learning, in my opinion, because you’re feeding your brain.”

But that’s not to say she’s tabling the cosmetics issue. In early April of this year, Kardashian launched Poosh, a lifestyle site where she and an editorial team chronicle everything from skin care advice (“Body Care Hacks for Great Skin“) to food (“Kourt’s Matcha Latte Recipe“) to motherhood (“The Safe Sunscreens Kourt uses for Her Kids“). The goal of the site, she says, is to talk about health and wellness in a non-preachy, non-granola way, while also weaving in that iconic Kardashian sex appeal.

“I just wanted to have a space where I could open up a conversation—where instead of being judgmental or being like ‘this is the way and that’s it,’ the site offers things to learn about,” she says. “I’ve learned so much from starting Poosh, even on topics that I may have wanted to know about but didn’t have the time to research. We’re finding out so much and are able to share that.” Perhaps unsurprising to fans who watch KUWTK, the relationship articles, many of which are written by clinical therapists, are some her favorites to read. “I find them really fascinating,” she says.

Katie Sturino Was Told No One Would Buy ‘Chub-Rub’ Products. Joke’s on Them.

Katie Sturino sees you staring. But, to be fair, she gets it. It’s still uncomfortable to have a conversation about chub-rub, let alone see a woman prop her leg up, pop the cap off her anti-chafe stick, and slather it on her inner thighs in the middle of the street without shame. And that’s exactly why she does it. Everywhere—on the sidewalks of New York City, in a European airport, in front of Coco Chanel’s old Parisian apartment—whenever and wherever she needs it.

As the founder of Megababe, a modern personal care brand that caters to traditionally “embarrassing” issues like chafing and boob sweat, Sturino is on a mission to make these concerns as normal as talking about a haircut. “I got the idea for Megababe because after years and years of using a men’s product to stop thigh chafe, I was like, is this the best I can do? A product that’s meant for men’s ball areas?” she says. “There was nothing just for women that wasn’t embarrassing or cheesy, and I thought there needed to be a normal, cool product for us.”

Partly to get the buzz out for her brand’s first product, Thigh Rescue, and partly because, well, she needs to use it anyway, Sturino began filming her now-famous “throwing a leg up” videos for Instagram. “No one knows what I’m doing,” she says, laughing. “Everyone thinks that I’m having a weird, inappropriate moment. I’ve had people unfollow me because they’re like, ‘I don’t want to see that.’ To which I respond, ‘See what? I’m just throwing a leg up.'”

When Sturino first came up with the idea for the brand, she had just as many confused conversations. Friends and family told her a cool, millennial-friendly line aimed at thigh-chafe was too “niche.” Others, mostly men, straight up didn’t believe it was an issue. “So many men have been like, ‘I don’t know what that is. I don’t think women get that,'” she says.

But when she launched Thigh Rescue in the summer of 2017, the numbers spoke for themselves. Within a week, she sold out of her entire inventory. “We made 5,000 units of Thigh Rescue to start with,” she says. “I don’t know if that sounds like a big or a small number to you, but 5,000 of anything is a lot when you’re starting with nothing. So when we sold out in the first week, we were out of stock the rest of the summer. That was awful—but it was also really cool. It confirmed, whoa, this is needed.”

Now You Can Listen to All 131 The Baby-Sitters Club Books on Audio

The Baby-Sitters Club is truly having a moment in 2019. Just last week, Netflix announced that the streaming service is turning the classic series of novels into a new series starring Alicia Silverstone as Kristy Thompson’s mom, Elizabeth Thomas-Brewer. And now, starting today, Audible is releasing all 131 titles onto its platform for your nostalgic listening pleasure as the summer winds to a close.

Audible has even secured a big star to narrate the first five novels: Elle Fanning. “The fierce friendships and babysitting adventures of The Baby-Sitters Club have been so much fun to perform,” the actor said in a press release. “It has been such an exciting and new experience for me to bring this entrepreneurial squad to life as Audible books. People can now relive these coming of age stories in a whole new way or enjoy them for the very first time.”

A scene from the 1995 film version.

©Columbia Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection

But really, did the books ever go away? We’d argue no. The first book by Ann M. Martin was published in 1986 and since then more than one generation has learned a thing or two about entrepreneurship, friendship, family problems, and coming of age from Kristy Thomas, Mary Anne Spier, Claudia Kishi, Stacey McGill, Dawn Schafer, and all the other characters who are introduced in the fictional town of Stoneybrook, Connecticut. And then, of course, there was the great 1995 film starring Rachel Leigh Cook and Schuyler Fisk, among others.

“I’m thrilled to see that the readership for The Baby-sitters Club continues to grow after all these years,” Martin said in Audible’s press release. “And I’m grateful and honored to hear from fans – young and old – who have supported the series with such affection, love and nostalgia for all things BSC. I’m excited that Audible will bring the books to life in a new format for the next generation.”

Get your Baby-Sitters Club fix here—and you’ll be prepped and ready when the Netflix show finally premieres.