It Sure Seems Like Kylie Jenner’s Lip Fillers Are Back

After spending months going Restylane-free, Kylie Jenner appears to have added lip filler appointments back to her calendar. On Tuesday afternoon, she shared a selfie on her Instagram Story and revealed in the caption that she had some sort of lip procedure the night before, courtesy of Pawnta Cosmetic Dermatology of Beverly Hills.

“Thanks @pawnta for coming through late last night with a lip touch up!” Jenner wrote. Though she didn’t explicitly say what that “touch up” entailed, it seems likely that the makeup mogul has gotten her formerly signature lip fillers once again. This comeback arrives about three months after the 21-year-old shared that she decided to have her filler removed. At the time, after a commenter wrote on Instagram that Jenner looked like “the old Kylie” in one post, Jenner admitted, “I got rid of all my filler.”

Kylie Jenner Confirms She's Using Lip Fillers Again 1

PHOTO: kyliejenner/Instagram Stories

Though she never explicitly explained why she decided to stop getting her lips filled for a few months, it may have had something to do with 8-month-old daughter Stormi Webster. In her September 2018 cover story for Vogue Australia, Jenner posed makeup-free and spoke about how becoming a mother had helped her accept her unfiltered self. “I feel like having a daughter, and thinking about beauty in the future, has definitely changed me, and I feel like it has made me love myself more and accept everything about me,” she told the magazine. “It’s just having a different outlook on life so I can pass that on to her. I want to be an example for her. What kind of example would I be if she said she didn’t like her ears, and then I didn’t like them either? I just want to teach her that. I’m trying to love myself more.”

Jenner has long been open about her insecurities about her lips. She revealed during a September 2017 episode of Life of Kylie that she first turned to lipstick and then to fillers after a boy she liked criticized the size of her lips. Earlier this year, the star promised she’d soon be sharing her entire experience with fillers with her fans, writing on Twitter that she was working on a vlog “about my whole lip filler journey.”

Related: It Sure Looks Like Kylie Jenner Skin Care Products Are on Their Way

Riverdale Season 3 Spoilers: Creator Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa Reveals What’s to Come

Last season, Riverdale ended with Archie Andrews wrongly accused of murdering Cassidy Brooke (remember him?) and faced with the harsh reality that he might end up in prison instead of high school. Meanwhile, Veronica basically emancipated herself from her father and came away with a new business endeavor in the process: Pop’s Chock’lit Shoppe. Bughead seemed to be in fine form—for once—but Betty’s sister, Polly, was a different story. The elder Cooper sibling joined a cult, and it looked like Alice is her next target. Cheryl became an honorary serpent and coupled up with Toni, while legally emancipating herself from her mother and taking control of Thistlehouse. Oh, and Hal Cooper went to jail, as one would expect if you’re the Black Hood.

Got it? Good, because Riverdale returns for season three today (Wednesday, October 10) with a whole bunch of loose ends to tie up and a brand new mystery to reveal. Damn, can’t these people get any rest?

Actually, that’s exactly how Riverdale creator Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa likes it. “Everyone is treating season three like it’s season one,” he tells Glamour.com. “We want this to be an edge-of-your-seat season, so we’re really excited. Unless you’re Archie, of course, who probably wouldn’t mind a little less drama.

“We’ll definitely know Archie’s fate by the end of the episode,” Aguirre-Sacasa promises. “One thing we’re doing a little bit different this year is jumping in time—three months to be exact—so when we meet [up with] Archie he’s mid-trial.” While Aguirre-Sacasa won’t reveal Archie’s odds of being set free, he will tell us plenty of other information, including some exciting news for Choni and Bughead fans. But with the news that Jughead’s mom and sister are coming on board (played by Gina Gershon and newcomer Trinity Likins), what does that mean for F.P. and Alice hopefuls? To our surprise, Aguirre-Sacasa is spilling the tea. Spoilers ahead!

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PHOTO: Katie Yu/The CW

Fans have dissected the teaser trailer where the core four are at the lake, riding in the jalopy, etc. Is that all a dream sequence or, if it’s real, does that mean that Archie is exonerated?

Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa: Those scenes really happen, and we wanted to capture this idea of stealing one last moment of youth and innocence and, honestly, summer vacation. It’s like trying to get that last day of summer vacation to be the best day of summer vacation, and that’s what went into that episode. Those scenes really happened. I wasn’t there personally, but [I heard] the water was cold. It was a really hot day the scene was filmed, so even though the water was cold, I think everyone was really down for it.

Varchie fans will get some wish fulfillment in those scenes, but going forward, which pairing will have the happier season three? Varchie or Bughead?

RAS: I think right now Bughead [is going] to have the happier season three. I will say though to Varchie fans that Veronica and Archie are proving to be very much…they’re trying to hang on to each other through the troubles in a really visceral way. Even though they could be heading towards rocks, they’re really clinging to each other because they feel so deeply for each other.

Right. And Veronica has now severed ties with her father, owns Pop’s, and went through a major transition since we last saw her.

RAS: Veronica is not to be trifled with, and Hiram is the architect behind her unhappiness and Archie’s troubles. She’s not down with rolling over and just letting him steamroll over her happiness.

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PHOTO: Katie Yu/The CW

Over the summer, Lochlyn Munro (Hal Cooper) told me he’ll be back this season. When can viewers expect to see Hal again?

RAS: Not in the first few episodes, but sooner than you might expect.

Should we expect him to be behind bars all season?

RAS: When we reconnect with him, he’s definitely behind bars, behind glass, behind barbed wire. He’s in maximum security, that’s for sure.

And what about Chic? His fate was left open-ended toward the end of season two.

RAS: That is buried a bit, I would say. But we haven’t seen the body. Even when you’ve seen the body, I say never say never.

Chapter Thirty-Four: Judgment Night

PHOTO: THE CW

That’s why I have a theory that Cheryl’s uncle Claudius is really her father. I think he’s been impersonating his brother, and it was the uncle who we saw die at the end of season one.

RAS: [Laughs] That’s a theory that has been floated by a few people. It’s definitely something that’s within the realm of possibility on our show, that’s for sure.

Let’s talk about F.P. and Alice. We know from last season that Polly was trying to help Alice by drawing her into this cult, so how will that impact—if at all—Alice’s potential relationship with F.P.?

RAS: In a weird way, the farm could open the door for Falice because the farm says to be alive in the moment. Do whatever you think, burn the past, there is no future, there’s only now. So in a weird way, the farm could be seen as giving permission to Alice to pursue F.P. The bigger threat to them will be the fact that Alice is married to Hal and F.P. is married to Gladys.

Speaking of, what’s the state of the marriage between F.P. and Gladys?

RAS: They’re strained and estranged from each other. [Laughs]

Gina Gershon doesn’t appear as Gladys until December 12, which means there are two months of episodes from now until then. What will Falice’s relationship status be by then? One would assume they’d be in a relationship just to make things more complicated when Gladys enters the picture.

RAS: Yeah, I think if this wasn’t Riverdale and it was just Falice exploring their relationship, they would be in pretty deep by the time Gladys gets there. We do see them quite together and quite intimate, but Falice is also dealing with their part in a crime that happened 25 years earlier, which is sort of rearing its ugly head this season as well. So Falice doesn’t exist on a blissed-out island apart from the day-to-day trials and tribulations of Riverdale. They’re very much caught up in the season mystery as well.

Let’s move on to Cheryl and Toni. They were together by the end of the season, and Cheryl has emancipated herself from her mother and has Thistlehouse all to herself. So will Choni be moving in together?

RAS: We’re really enjoying them being the reigning queens of Riverdale High, which we’re going to play them as. They’re still in the honeymoon phase. They are kind of getting in and out of trouble with the Serpents, without the Serpents. They too will be drawn into the season-long mysteries, and, yes, there will be a discussion about Choni living together.

From Barber to Actress and Musician: Meet ‘All American’ star Bre-Z

On the surface, All American might seem like a male-heavy drama about football. Not so fast: While the CW series does feature two male leads (Daniel Ezra as high school player Spencer James; Taye Diggs as the coach who recruits him), that would be only half the story. Where All American really excels is the depiction of James’ home life—and the complicated, fascinating women who affect it.

One of those women who serves as James’ moral compass is his cousin and best friend Tamia “Coop” Cooper, played by Empire star Bre-Z. “She constantly pushes him not be afraid to leave his comfort zone,” Bre-Z tells Glamour. “I love that my character is not one-dimensional. I love the positivity within her regardless of what she feels like she has to do because of the environment that she’s been brought up in. And she’s funny as hell.” Most important, “I just love that for women on TV right now, we’re displaying the power that we always knew we had. That’s so exciting.”

And much like All American, there’s more to the 31-year-old Philadelphia native than what’s on the surface. From her former career as a barber to the story behind her name, Bre-Z wants to share her story. Read on.

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PHOTO: Sami Drasin

What’s your birth name and the story behind Bre-Z?

Bre-Z: My birth name is Calesha [Murray]. It was so funny because I think when I was in fifth grade, my mom got a call home from my teachers and they said, “Your daughter can’t keep writing Bre-Z on her papers.” I thought that was my name. Everybody always called me Bre-Z, so I didn’t know. My mom sat me down and [explained it to me]. Now when people want to call me Calesha, I’m like, “No, it’s Bre-Z! You can’t take it from me again!” [Laughs.] Bre-Z is cooler anyway!

Glamour: So how did everyone start calling you Bre-Z?

Bre-Z: My grandmother on my mom’s side actually gave me that name. I was in the delivery room, crying at the top of my lungs, but they couldn’t figure out why because nothing was really wrong. [It turns out] I was cold. Once they wrapped me up and swaddled me and shut the windows, that was the end of it. My grandmother said, “Oh. She was cold!”

Glamour: What brought you to Hollywood?

Bre-Z: I grew up in Philadelphia and was raised in Wilmington, Delaware. I kind of just knew there was something just special about myself, coming from a place where people rarely make it out. I’ve seen friends and things like that…so many people pass on before we even got to the point where we wanted to pursue a career. Ever since I was in sixth grade, I knew what I wanted to do. Once I had that talk with my mom, I was into music, and she helped and filled out college applications, and I actually did everything I said I was going to do.

I started off as a barber, cutting hair for men since I was 10 years old. I was working in the shop, and that was my bread and butter throughout high school and growing up. I finally got to a place where I wanted to focus on my music, so I pulled back from cutting hair a little bit, and eventually I landed up in Atlanta because my mom had a job transfer. I was like 19, and I was there working and making so much money. It was great—but a few years after that, I got tired of it and felt like I hit a plateau in my life. I was just kind of cruising altitude.

Glamour: And then what happened?

Bre-Z: Me and a friend decided, “Fuck it. We’re just going to move to L.A.” So, we moved out here. I was maybe 24. I’m still a mama’s girl, and we’re very family oriented. I got here, and six or seven months later I was asked to audition for Empire. I’ve been here ever since.

Glamour: Did you have any acting or music training? Or are you self-taught?

Bre-Z: I self-taught, even as a barber. I felt like I never had the money to afford the training or all the necessary things…. I didn’t have it. I was forced to teach myself everything, even when it came to making graphics. I had to teach myself that and how to edit videos, and I’d take my own photos. I was always very artsy and in love with the art, but I couldn’t afford it. So I had to teach myself.

Glamour: Were there any actors you looked to for inspiration along the way?

Bre-Z: I was always such a fan of strong, powerful women like Angela Bassett, Queen Latifah. Now you got Kerry Washington, Taraji P. Henson. I was always a fan of that. But I don’t think I looked any further than just being a fan. Acting wasn’t anything I was pursuing. That came from God himself. You work so hard to do one thing, and then you’re like, “What? Now I’m a makeup artist?” That’s what it was. I was so in love with being a barber and the satisfaction I got from making people feel good and look good. Then you just drop me on a TV screen…so it really took for me to have a sit-down from Terrence Howard discussing the same thing you and I are, and he was like, “Best thing you can do is just be yourself. You’re very passionate, you’re very sympathetic.” So every time I got a role, he would just tell me to put myself in their shoes. As simple as it sounds, it was the greatest advice he could have given me.

Glamour: Do you feel most yourself when you’re acting or creating music?

Bre-Z: In my music. The music and being in the studio is one of my most vulnerable places. On TV people perceive me to be a particular type of person. People get so invested in these [characters] they don’t actually know who I am. But my music is a chance for me to say, “This is me.”

Glamour: Will you get to sing on All American?

Bre-Z: I think it’s only right. So I’m excited. I think so.

Glamour: Finally, what do you hope other young women take away from seeing you in this role or hearing your story?

Bre-Z: I want women to understand that they can do it. I’m not afraid to tell [my] story. I don’t come from a bad place, but I do come from a place of uncertainty. We don’t know what the plan is going to be for our lives. Your faith, along with your drive, is only going to take you where you allow it to. I really hope women are inspired and not afraid to dream or do it. I think we fear the thought the most. Because when you think about it, nothing actually ever happens because you didn’t do anything.

From Barber to Actress and Musician: Meet All American’s Bre-Z

On the surface, All American might seem like a male-heavy drama about football. Not so fast: While the CW series does feature two male leads (Daniel Ezra as high school player Spencer James; Taye Diggs as the coach who recruits him), that would be only half the story. Where All American really excels is the depiction of James’ home life—and the complicated, fascinating women who affect it.

One of those women who serves as James’ moral compass is his cousin/best friend Tamia “Coop” Cooper, played by Empire star Bre-Z. “She constantly pushes him not be afraid to leave his comfort zone,” Bre-Z tells Glamour. “I love that my character is not one dimensional. I love the positivity within her regardless of what she feels like she has to do because of the environment that she’s been brought up in. And she’s funny as hell.” Most important, “I just love that for women on TV right now, we’re displaying the power that we always knew we had. That’s so exciting.”

And much like All American, there’s more to the Philadelphia native, 31, than what’s on the surface. From her former career as a barber to the story behind her name, Bre-Z wants to share her story. Read on.

daniel-ezra-bre-z-all-american-season-1-2018.jpg

PHOTO: Sami Drasin

What’s your birth name and the story behind Bre-Z?

Bre-Z: My birth name is Calesha [Murray]. It was so funny because I think when I was in fifth grade, my mom got a call home from my teachers and they said, “Your daughter can’t keep writing Bre-Z on her papers.” I thought that was my name. Everybody always called me Bre-Z, so I didn’t know. My mom sat me down and [explained it to me]. Now when people want to call me Calesha, I’m like, “No, it’s Bre-Z! You can’t take it from me again!” [Laughs] Bre-Z is cooler anyway!

So how did everyone start calling you Bre-Z?

Bre-Z: My grandmother on my mom’s side actually gave me that name. I was in the delivery room, crying at the top of my lungs, but they couldn’t figure out why because nothing was really wrong. [It turns out] I was cold. Once they wrapped me up and swaddled me and shut the windows, that was the end of it. My grandmother said, “Oh. She was cold!”

What brought you to Hollywood?

Bre-Z: I grew up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was raised in Wilmington, Delaware. I kind of just knew there was something just special about myself, coming from a place where people rarely make it out. I’ve seen friends and things like that…so many people pass on before we even got to the point where we wanted to pursue a career. Ever since I was in sixth grade, I knew what I wanted to do. Once I had that talk with my mom, I was into music, and she helped and filled out college applications, and I actually did everything I said I was going to do.

I started off as a barber, cutting hair for men since I was 10 years old. I was working in the shop, and that was my bread and butter throughout high school and growing up. I finally got to a place where I wanted to focus on my music, so I pulled back from cutting hair a little bit and eventually I landed up in Atlanta because my mom had a job transfer. I was like 19, and I was there working and making so much money. It was great—but a few years after that, I got tired of it and felt like I hit a plateau in my life. I was just kind of cruising altitude.

And then what happened?

Bre-Z: Me and a friend decided, “Fuck it. We’re just going to move to L.A.” So, we moved out here. I was maybe 24. I’m still a mama’s girl, and we’re very family oriented. I got here, and six or seven months later I was asked to audition for Empire. I’ve been here ever since.

Did you have any acting or music training? Or are you self-taught?

Bre-Z: I self-taught, even as a barber. I felt like I never had the money to afford the training or all the necessary things…I didn’t have it. I was forced to teach myself everything, even when it came to making graphics. I had to teach myself that and how to edit videos, and I’d take my own photos. I was always very artsy and in love with the art, but I couldn’t afford it. So I had to teach myself.

Were there any actors you looked to for inspiration along the way?

Bre-Z: I was always such a fan of strong, powerful women like Angela Bassett, Queen Latifah. Now you got Kerry Washington, Taraji P. Henson. I was always a fan of that. But I don’t think I looked any further than just being a fan. Acting wasn’t anything I was pursuing. That came from God himself. You work so hard to do one thing, and then you’re like, “What? Now I’m a makeup artist?” That’s what it was. I was so in love with being a barber and the satisfaction I got from making people feel good and look good. Then you just drop me on a TV screen…so it really took for me to have a sit-down from Terrence Howard discussing the same thing you and I are, and he was like, “Best thing you can do is just be yourself. You’re very passionate, you’re very sympathetic.” So every time I got a role, he would just tell me to put myself in their shoes. As simple as it sounds, it was the greatest advice he could have given me.

Do you feel most yourself when you’re acting or creating music?

Bre-Z: In my music. The music and being in the studio is one of my most vulnerable places. On TV people perceive me to be a particular type of person. People get so invested in these [characters] they don’t actually know who I am. But my music is a chance for me to say, “This is me.”

Will you get to sing on All American?

Bre-Z: I think it’s only right. So I’m excited. I think so.

Finally, what do you hope other young women take away from seeing you in this role or hearing your story?

Bre-Z: I want women to understand that they can do it. I’m not afraid to tell [my] story. I don’t come from a bad place, but I do come from a place of uncertainty. We don’t know what the plan is going to be for our lives. Your faith, along with your drive, is only going to take you where you allow it to. I really hope women are inspired and not afraid to dream or do it. I think we fear the thought the most. Because when you think about it, nothing actually ever happens because you didn’t do anything.

Women in Congress Have Never Hit What Researchers Call “The Tipping Point.” How Would Government Change If They Did?

The end of 2013 government shutdown started with pizza, wine, and 20-ish frustrated female senators. It was Aaron Sorkin–esque, except zero men were present.

By the first week of October, the partisan battle had dragged Washington to a halt. Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D–N.H.) invited the women to her office to discuss a plan to reopen the government that Senator Susan Collins (R–Maine) had put forth. “There were a lot of people—ahem, men—who would have liked to be the bullies on the playground and just cross their arms and see who had to back down first,” Senator Patty Murray (D–Wash.) recalls. “We didn’t want to wait to see who backed down.” She’s heard that women politicians are more polite and more patient than men, but that wasn’t their motivation: “What we were was impatient.” To finish it. To get back to business.

When the shutdown ended at last, the late Senator John McCain (R–Ariz.) tipped his hat to his female colleagues: “Leadership, I must fully admit, was provided primarily from women in the Senate.”

The Senate comprises 100 members. At the time of the 2013 fracas, its female faction was made up of 16 Democrats and four Republicans. Today the Senate boasts 23 women (only 52 have ever served). It’s a paltry improvement, but leaps and bounds better than the fraction of women in power in other strata of influence: Just six governors are women. Only 24 Fortune 500 companies are women-led—that’s less than 5 percent.

Sen. Shaheen wants to see the Senate look like America, with an equal gender split. (Hers is a moderate stance; when asked at what point there will be enough women on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg pronounced, “When there are nine.”) But even a modest increase in women could make a difference in how the legislative branch operates and votes and affects all our lives.

The midterm elections will see more women than ever on the ballot. What we don’t know is how many of those candidates will win. If current female incumbents hold their seats, a woman-versus-woman race in Arizona will inch the number of women in the Senate up to 24. Some pollsters think it’s possible that Democratic Representative Jacky Rosen could win in Nevada or Republican Representative Marsha Blackburn could come out ahead in Tennessee, which would push the number to 25 or 26 and create a coalition with far more influence than women have had so far.

With a result like that, we’d be closer than ever to getting the answer to a question that has tantalized and divided political scientists for decades: What would happen to our gridlocked, super-partisan politics if women surpassed the tipping point?

The idea of the tipping point dates back to 1977, when Rosabeth Moss Kanter, then a professor at Yale University and Harvard Law School, theorized the idea of critical mass as it applies to women in positions of power. Kanter observed that women had to make up at least 30 percent of a team to contribute at their full potential. Under that threshold, women were often dismissed as token representatives of their gender—not equal participants, let alone persuasive decision makers. Ever since then, experts have debated the ideal proportion: Is it 35 percent? Would 25 be sufficient? Whatever the number, women in federal government haven’t reached it. “The point is to be included—not seen as an outsider,” says Kanter, now chair and director of Harvard University’s Advanced Leadership Initiative.

Make no mistake, it does help to have one woman, or a handful, in “the room where it happens.” That was visible in April, when Senator Tammy Duckworth (D–Ill.) gave birth to her daughter, Maile. Less than two weeks later she was back in the Senate, Maile in tow, for a vote. But Maile’s presence there—let alone her warm welcome— would have once been inconceivable. Babies have been banned from the floor as far back as all the people who serve in the Senate can remember. When Sen. Duckworth learned she was pregnant, she asked Senator Amy Klobuchar (D–Minn.) to lead a bipartisan effort to strike down the rule. For months Sen. Klobuchar met with colleagues to convince them to support a reversal. Some on the Hill were worried about whether—the horror!—Sen. Duckworth would have to breastfeed. But Sen. Klobuchar made her case, and the rule was overturned with unanimous consent. “I think it would do us good…to see a pacifier next to the antique inkwells on our desks,” said Senator Dick Durbin (D–Ill.) at the time.

PHOTO: CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES

Senator Tammy Duckworth, back at work with her newborn.

It’s a nice sentiment, but it overlooks the fact that the United States remains the lone industrialized nation in the world that doesn’t guarantee paid parental leave. Kanter believes that more elected women would lead to changes in policies like paid leave or access to health care. But Georgetown University professor Michele Swers, Ph.D., is more skeptical. While she acknowledges that women have unique experiences to draw on that can make men view certain political issues with a fresh perspective, she cautions that women are not immune to the extreme partisanship that has infected Washington, despite the notion that women are reputed to be better at collaboration and risk assessment than men. “At the national level, there’s just less room for collaboration than there used to be,” Swers says.

Even so, women in the Senate have tried to make the most of their low numbers. It was former Senator Barbara Mikulski (D–Md.) who set out to boost women’s collective power with routine bipartisan dinners. Credit where credit is due, notes Sen. Murray: “Because we took the time separate from legislative action to know where people come from…then when those impasses are reached, it’s much more likely that someone will reach out and ask, ‘How can we solve this?’ ”

There’s evidence, too, that women in office use their voice to different effect than men. In a 2010 University of Minnesota study, researchers found that women in the House of Representatives give more floor speeches. (How else to be heard in public?) And female politicians tend to emphasize issues that matter more to women and families (never mind that most families include men too): A deep dive into 2018 congressional transcripts found that female representatives spent more than twice as much time on health care in their speeches as male legislators did. Those efforts could have a greater impact, in part, because of the “Jill Robinson effect.” Two political scientists coined the term in 2011, positing that because bias makes it harder for women to get elected, those who do persevere are more adept lawmakers. (The phenomenon is named after baseball icon Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play Major League Baseball.) To wit: The research found that congresswomen claim up to 9 percent more in flexible dollars for their districts than congressmen do. Want to better fund education or health care in your area? Elect women.

While business doesn’t do much better than government when it comes to female representation— women make up just 21 percent of corporate board seats in the S&P 1500—active steps have been taken to boost their ranks. California recently passed bills that would require publicly traded companies in that state to have at least one woman on their board by 2020, and more women, depending on a company’s size, by 2022. Europe has had such requirements for a decade. In 2006, for example, Norway established a quota for women on boards. France now has one too; the aim for female representation is 40 percent. The laws were passed in the name of fairness, but they’re also good for business. A 2016 report from global nonprofit Catalyst found that companies with three or more women on their board of directors, no matter the size, outperformed the competition across three crucial metrics: return on equity, return on sales, and return on invested capital. In other words, money, money, money. And research from Miriam Schwartz-Ziv, Ph.D., assistant professor at Michigan State University, has found that members of gender-balanced boards are twice as active (meaning, likely to take initiative) as non-gender- balanced boards.

That math underscores principles that William P. Lauder, executive chairman of the Estée Lauder Companies, says have been baked into the DNA of his family’s business since its inception. In April the company added two more women, Jennifer Hyman, cofounder and CEO of Rent the Runway, and Jennifer Tejada, CEO of PagerDuty, to the board, which means eight of its 17 directors are now women. (For perspective, just three Fortune 500 companies have an equal number of male and female board members.) Lauder chafes at the excuse that there are too few qualified women candidates in the pipeline. Lauder, a member of the 30 Percent Coalition, an initiative to create more diverse corporate boards, maintains women are a “value add” for companies’ boards. Before beginning this latest search, he remembers he was explicit with his current board members: “I said, ‘Here’s what we need—we need expertise in cyber and we need expertise in social and digital.’ On top of that, I said, ‘We need more women directors.’ Those were the criteria: female, with these qualifications.”

Hyman notes that women are responsible for 85 percent of purchases in the U.S., so it just makes sense to empower them in business—who better to know the consumer? She joined Estée Lauder because she trusted her opinion would be valued. “It wasn’t that they hit a number,” she says. “It was that they embraced the diversity of the people who were there across every metric. They say it out loud.”

When Ayanna Pressley became the first black woman ever to serve on the Boston City Council in 2009, she did not feel, from the media and the public at least, the kind of embrace that Hyman describes. What she remembers was the sense that people outside the council believed her success was owed to the idea that voters had wanted to elect a “first.” That narrative, she says, “took away from what I had accomplished.” (After she defeated a 10-term incumbent for the Democratic nomination in September, Pressley is now expected to be elected to Congress in November.) Pressley hoped that chatter would die down in 2013, when Michelle Wu was elected to serve on the council. But both women insist it wasn’t until two more women, Anissa Essaibi George and Andrea Joy Campbell, joined in 2015 (and pushed the 13-person council over the 30 percent mark) that their gender started to matter less.

PHOTO: KEITH BEDFORD/THE BOSTON GLOBE VIA GETTY IMAGES

Ayanna Pressley (second from right), Michelle Wu (second from left), and the women of the Boston City Council.

“There had been a lot of pressure on us to represent this whole spectrum [of womanhood],” Wu says. “Would we line up together? Would we take opposite sides? There was so much examination, solely about our relationship with each other because we are women.” The addition of Essaibi George and Campbell made clear that they serve their own constituencies, not just those who happen to have the same chromosomes. That’s a freedom women in federal government, and Democratic women in particular, lack. When Senator Heidi Heitkamp (D–N.D.) declined to vote for stricter gun restrictions in the wake of the Newtown, Connecticut, shooting, she said in an interview with Time that the backlash from women nationwide surprised her: “A female friend in the Senate said to me, ‘You know, it’s because they feel you represent all women, not just the women of North Dakota.’ ”

Earlier in 2018, as yet another government shutdown over how and whether to protect the Dreamers loomed, Sen. Collins introduced a compromise bill that would have given the young undocumented immigrants legal status over time and fund border security. Her effort came closer than other prospective fixes, but failed in a 54–45 vote. An overwhelming number of female senators voted for her amendment, 18 in all. (Four opposed, and one wasn’t present.) Sen. Shaheen points out that with six more likeminded women, the bill would have passed. Nine or 10 more, and women would have had a critical mass—and votes to spare.

Perhaps the headline would have read: “Women Save the Dreamers.” But a better result? If people had looked at the numbers and seen that more than 60 senators with different points of view found a path forward. That, explains Ellen Pao, the activist who cofounded the nonprofit Project Include after losing a gender discrimination suit against the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers in 2015, is the real purpose of a critical mass. The more women in power, the less gender has to be discussed. “People need to focus on full representation for all people,” Pao says. “Not just on gender, but on race, sexual orientation, age, and socioeconomic background. We have to keep that goal in mind and realize that 30 percent is nothing, or at least it’s not enough. A threshold is not a destination.”

Mattie Kahn is a senior editor at Glamour.
Lede photo by OLIVER CONTRERAS-POOL/GETTY IMAGES

Taylor Swift Literally Lit the 2018 American Music Awards Stage on Fire

Taylor Swift may have done something bad—but watching her do it felt so good. The singer, who just wrapped the U.S. leg of her Reputation tour, opened the 2018 American Music Awards with a very fiery performance of her song “I Did Something Bad.”

In a long-sleeved, sparkly bodysuit and thigh-high black boots, and accompanied by a troupe of dancers, the singer lit up the AMAs stage—but she had some help. Her performance was enhanced with stunning pyrotechnics as she belted out the track’s dance-y chorus.

The entire performance was punctuated by the appearance of a giant cobra rising out of the set behind her, a nod to the snake motif that has characterized the entire Reputation era. This performance marks Swift’s first time performing at an awards show since the release of her latest album. Her last awards show performance was over two years ago, at the Grammys in 2016. Meanwhile, she hasn’t hit the stage for a song at the American Music Awards since 2014.

Taylor Swift AMAs 1

PHOTO: Kevin Winter/Getty Images

But this isn’t the only time Swift snagged the spotlight this week. She made headlines for posting an unprecedented political statement to Instagram on Sunday, in which she endorsed Democrats Phil Bredesen for Senate and Jim Cooper for House of Representatives in the upcoming midterm elections in the state of Tennessee. She ended her statement by encouraging her fans to educate themselves about the upcoming election and make their own voices heard by voting. “Please, please educate yourself on the candidates running in your state and vote based on who most closely represents your values. For a lot of us, we may never find a candidate or party with whom we agree 100% on every issue, but we have to vote anyway.”

One day later, her comments appear to have had a significant impact on voter registration. But the post also prompted several harsh responses from several conservatives, including President Donald Trump, who declared that he now likes her music “25% less.”

We, on the other hand, would watch this performance over and over and over again if we could. Below, see a GIF recap courtesy of GIPHY.

RELATED: Fans Have a Theory Linking Donald Trump and Taylor Swift’s AMAs Performance

Cardi B’s 2018 AMAs Gown Needs to Be Admired From Every Angle

While the rest of us have busy prepping for fall by filling our closets with long sleeves and muted colors, Cardi B is leaning into the florals—hard. On Tuesday, the rapper attended the 2018 American Music Awards wearing a jaw-dropping technicolor gown, complete with a matching headpiece, that made us want to hold on to the blooming prints for a little longer.

Cardi’s Dolce & Gabbana ballgown-style dress featured a fitted, spaghetti-strapped bodice and poufy, structured skirt with a dramatic slit. It was printed with a brightly-colored floral pattern, with a handful of poppy-esque embellishments to create a 3-D effect. (Even her heels had flowers on them!)

It’s a look that needs to be admired from every single angle. So behold, from the front…

Cardi B AMAs 1

PHOTO: John Shearer/Getty Images

And from the side…

Cardi B AMAs 3

PHOTO: John Shearer/Getty Images

And finally, the back…

2018 American Music Awards - Arrivals

PHOTO: John Shearer

Cardi accessorized with a fascinator made from the same floral-print material as her gown. She styled her dark hair in an elegant bun at the nape of her neck.

Cardi B AMAs 2

PHOTO: Steve Granitz/Getty Images

The “Taki Taki” singer also sported bright red lipstick, coordinating scarlet eyeshadow, and crystal-encrusted red nails.

Cardi B is up for eight awards at the 2018 AMAs, including Video of the Year and New Artist of the Year, tying with Drake for the most nominations at this year’s show. She’s set to take the stage to perform her hit single “I Like It” with collaborators Bad Bunny and J Balvin.

Related: Cardi B Living Her Best Life at Fashion Week

The Best Looks From the 2018 American Music Awards Red Carpet

There are many, many reasons not to sleep on the 2018 American Music Awards. Taylor Swift is performing. Tracee Ellis Ross is hosting once again—and when she did so in 2017, she wore 10 (10!) different outfits throughout the night. Selena Gomez showed up on the red carpet as a blonde last year. Point is, this award show is known for its surprises. And it always brings together a bunch of your favorites (Taylor Swift, Kelsea Ballerini, among others) for a pretty major red carpet. Within the first hour of the 2018 show, we already had looks from designers like Pyer Moss, Cushnie, and Balmain. So as you wait to see how many wardrobe changes Ellis Ross has in store for us this year, check out the absolute best looks from the 2018 American Music Awards red carpet.

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Dove Is Officially PETA-Certified Cruelty Free

When news broke last month that California had motioned to ban all cosmetic animal testing by 2020, it felt like the first good thing to happen in months. Not only was it a bright spot within a dark news cycle, but thanks to the size of California’s economy, it seemed like the bill would effect real change in the beauty industry. Now animal lovers have another reason to celebrate: Unilever, the parent company of a handful of major drugstore brands, just announced it’s ramping up its efforts to bring an end to animal testing.

In a press release from the company, representatives wrote that Unilever is supporting a global ban on animal testing for cosmetics and collaborating with the Humane Society International (HSI) to make it happen. For an idea of how significant this news is, Unilever owns 57 beauty and personal care brands alone. Those include drugstore mainstays Dove, Simple, Love Beauty & Planet, Suave, and Clear, to name just a few. And in no accident, the release notes that Unilever’s news coincides with Dove officially gaining PETA accreditation as a cruelty-free brand.

What does this mean for your body wash? Likely, not much outside of PETA’s cruelty-free logo showing up on Dove’s labels in January 2019. According to Dove director Amy Stepanian, the brand didn’t previously test on animals and has been using alternative methods for 30 years. What the new initiative does enforce, however, is the prohibition of animal testing by governments on the brand’s behalf. (In layman’s terms: A country can’t go behind Unilever’s back and test their products on animals before they hit shelves.)

That’s NBD for Europe, admittedly: Ever progressive, the EU banned animal testing back in 2013, says David Blanchard, Unilever’s chief research and development officer. But by adding Unilever’s official cosign, Blanchard says the brand hopes it’ll put further pressure on the beauty industry and markets that require animal-testing (like China) to adopt more ethical safety testing.

The press release also mentions that through supporting the HSI, Unilever will join its #BeCrueltyFree initiative, which is leading animal testing legislative reform in multiple countries around the globe. Within Unilever, Love Beauty & Planet and Simple are in the midst of applying for PETA accreditation, Stepanian says.

It’s a small step, but one that means we’re closer to getting more global regulation around the way our makeup and skin care is tested. And on the heels of California’s animal-testing ban being signed into law on September 6, that’s looking sooner than ever.

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Best Thigh-High Boots: Black, Suede and Over-The-Knee

Tall boots, particularly thigh-high styles, are very in. Which could have something to with pants being very out. Just two weeks ago Prada and Gucci sent models down the runway in only their underwear, while celebrities like Ariana Grande have pioneered the no-bottoms movement, opting for oversized sweatshirts worn with only thigh-high boots.

If you’re someone who generally prefers to clothe your bottom half, however, no fear: Pairing thigh-high boots with skinny jeans, tights, leggings, and dresses or skirts of all lengths easily make fall outfits feel a little cooler.

A basic black thigh-high boot will never not deliver but, this season, there are some exciting options out there worth looking into. From crisp white styles to bold colors (red, anyone?) and prints like plaid, see below to shop our picks, many which are on sale right now. Ariana would approve.